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TOPIC: Is Oatmeal processed food???

 
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April 12, 2013 12:00 PM
I had this friend in high school who always ate those processed oats. His parents warned him against it and yet he continued. He said it gave him energy and was very filling. I never quite understood his obsession but years later I found out that he jumped off of a bridge and fell to his death. The thing is... he almost certainly had some unprocessed oats for breakfast that very day! Draw your own conclusions.
  41589374
April 12, 2013 12:01 PM
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If I could eliminate one word from MFP it would be "processed."


Could we make it two and add "organic" to the list? Please??


I wouldn't mind that. I mean, at least organic actually means something.... but then again most people who use the word don't actually know what it means. So, yeah.


i am just trying so hard to end my grocery store quest for "inorganic" bananas that I can actually eat... if you know what I mean... "Chemicals" could be next on a list of most misused words perhaps?


No inorganic bananas, but you can buy organic salt. And no I don't mean acetate.


It would be funny were it not so sad.


funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.
  20419576
April 12, 2013 12:01 PM
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If I could eliminate one word from MFP it would be "processed."


Could we make it two and add "organic" to the list? Please??


I wouldn't mind that. I mean, at least organic actually means something.... but then again most people who use the word don't actually know what it means. So, yeah.


I would like to eliminate the word clean. Thanks.
  27685240
April 12, 2013 12:07 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."
  6438378
April 12, 2013 12:10 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.
  20419576
April 12, 2013 12:11 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.


Dear god.
  6438378
April 12, 2013 12:13 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.


Dear god.


agreed.
  20419576
April 12, 2013 12:18 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.


As I have said before, cut carrots ARE processed. Thus Jonnythan's position on elimination of "processed" as it is misused...
  24441130
April 12, 2013 12:22 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.


As I have said before, cut carrots ARE processed. Thus Jonnythan's position on elimination of "processed" as it is misused...


haha the problem is people like you view the world in black and white where there are actually shades of grey.

a carrot that has been cut is far less processed than a pop tart. there is a gradient. and the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.
  20419576
April 12, 2013 12:25 PM
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haha the problem is people like you view the world in black and white where there are actually shades of grey.

a carrot that has been cut is far less processed than a pop tart. there is a gradient. and the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


Anything that starts out with "the problem is people like you" . . .

Anyway. I've noticed this being a source of friction many times in the forum. It may be helpful to specify that you're referring to "heavily processed foods" or something to denote the gradient you acknowledge.

I think everyone here agrees that a pop tart is more heavily processed than a baby carrot.

I further think everyone would agree that the sugars and carbs in a pop tart are so simple that it provides a very quick feeling of satisfaction which is closely followed by low blood sugar. That this dip can cause someone a sensation of hunger that induces them to eat more.

Y'all knuckleheads AGREE, STAHP IT!
Edited by BurtHuttz On April 12, 2013 12:26 PM
April 12, 2013 12:27 PM
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the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


I respectfully disagree - read the third world countries regarding their "unprocessed" water.
  24441130
April 12, 2013 12:28 PM
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the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


You've made this statement before. It's as much BS now as it was then.

Are your flax seeds more nutritionally beneficial before you grind them? How about oats right off the stalk? Wheat? Do you consume your wheat raw and unprocessed and never eat bread? And what about dairy? Do you refuse to eat cheese and instead drink only raw whole milk because it's better?
  6438378
April 12, 2013 12:28 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

haha the problem is people like you view the world in black and white where there are actually shades of grey.

a carrot that has been cut is far less processed than a pop tart. there is a gradient. and the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


Anything that starts out with "the problem is people like you" . . .

Anyway. I've noticed this being a source of friction many times in the forum. It may be helpful to specify that you're referring to "heavily processed foods" or something to denote the gradient you acknowledge.

I think everyone here agrees that a pop tart is more heavily processed than a baby carrot.

I further think everyone would agree that the sugars and carbs in a pop tart are so simple that it provides a very quick feeling of satisfaction which is closely followed by low blood sugar. That this dip can cause someone a sensation of hunger that induces them to eat more.

Y'all knuckleheads AGREE, STAHP IT!


But, but.... it's fun (kinda)!
  24441130
April 12, 2013 12:39 PM
I do love the steel cut or rolled oatmeal. The texture is really nice - has some actual chew to it rather than being like wallpaper paste. Kind of like preferring al dente pasta to the overcooked noodles most restaurants serve. I wonder how many people eat the instant stuff because they don't realize steel cut and rolled only take 10min in the microwave? And I suppose they've probably never tasted it to see there's a difference.
  41012893
April 12, 2013 1:09 PM
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the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


I respectfully disagree - read the third world countries regarding their "unprocessed" water.


sweet mother of god.
  20419576
April 12, 2013 1:19 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.


As I have said before, cut carrots ARE processed. Thus Jonnythan's position on elimination of "processed" as it is misused...


haha the problem is people like you view the world in black and white where there are actually shades of grey.

a carrot that has been cut is far less processed than a pop tart. there is a gradient. and the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


Yes, but no one says they are making food choices and switches based on choosing less processed versions or alternatives. No one says, I switched to raw baby carrots instead of candied carrots at my favorite restaurant. They just say they are "eliminating processed foods" or "eating clean" or "eating ____% clean". Which are all BS misleading terms.

Personally I don't think I have eaten so much as 0.00001 completely unprocessed foods in my life, because I tend to cook stuff and am not a zombie noshing on the still living. And I haven't routinely eaten dirty food since I was a small toddler who would put most anything in its mouth.
  8965296
April 12, 2013 1:20 PM
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the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


I respectfully disagree - read the third world countries regarding their "unprocessed" water.


sweet mother of god.


Okay, look, I know what you mean. That still doesn't change the fact that the abbreviated phrases result in misused words (e.g., ALL foods are made of chemicals.)

I think you and Jonnythan both seem like decent fellows, and I think you both have good intentions. I am not out to pick on you. It is a frustrating situation because people blindly buy into the whole "chemicals, processed, organic" things with no discernment whatsoever. Natural =/= good, for example, in the case of hemlock, but we get beaten over the head with "natural is better" all the time. I am just tired of a bunch of trumped up hype.
  24441130
April 12, 2013 1:21 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.


I grew up in the 60's and 70's. Everyone ate processed food, and a lot of if. Much fewer were overweight than now.
April 12, 2013 1:22 PM
the flavored ones I would stay away from... high in sugar.

The regular plain oats.. they are good but watch portions. too much of it will do more damage than good.
April 12, 2013 1:22 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.


As I have said before, cut carrots ARE processed. Thus Jonnythan's position on elimination of "processed" as it is misused...


haha the problem is people like you view the world in black and white where there are actually shades of grey.

a carrot that has been cut is far less processed than a pop tart. there is a gradient. and the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


Yes, but no one says they are making food choices and switches based on choosing less processed versions or alternatives. No one says, I switched to raw baby carrots instead of candied carrots at my favorite restaurant. They just say they are "eliminating processed foods" or "eating clean" or "eating ____% clean". Which are all BS misleading terms.

Personally I don't think I have eaten so much as 0.00001 completely unprocessed foods in my life, because I tend to cook stuff and am not a zombie noshing on the still living. And I haven't routinely eaten dirty food since I was a small toddler who would put most anything in its mouth.


clean does not mean uncooked. raw means uncooked.

and cutting out processed foods means pre-packaged, manufactured foods. making a salad is still eating unprocessed clean food. and if you'd like to argue it isn't then go ahead, but you're just being absurd and argumentative for argument's sake if you do.
  20419576
April 12, 2013 1:26 PM
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clean does not mean uncooked. raw means uncooked.

and cutting out processed foods means pre-packaged, manufactured foods. making a salad is still eating unprocessed clean food. and if you'd like to argue it isn't then go ahead, but you're just being absurd and argumentative for argument's sake if you do.


Coach Reddy, all he means is that claiming to eat 'clean' or 'unprocessed' foods is a bit of misnomer. And it is. The word 'clean' is not being used in its appropriate context, and any action taken to prepare food for consumption, in any way, means that it has been 'processed'.

No need to get up in arms about symantics(sp?).
Edited by UsedToBeHusky On April 12, 2013 1:27 PM
  7030416
April 12, 2013 1:29 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

clean does not mean uncooked. raw means uncooked.

and cutting out processed foods means pre-packaged, manufactured foods. making a salad is still eating unprocessed clean food. and if you'd like to argue it isn't then go ahead, but you're just being absurd and argumentative for argument's sake if you do.


Coach Reddy, all he means is that claiming to eat 'clean' or 'unprocessed' foods is a bit of misnomer. And it is. The word 'clean' is not being used in its appropriate context, and any action taken to prepare food for consumption, in any way, means that it has been 'processed'.

No need to get up in arms about symantics(sp?).


^lots of this. And I don't mean to be argumentative. Like I said, just sooo frustrated and tired of the hype and junk "science."
  24441130
April 12, 2013 1:31 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

clean does not mean uncooked. raw means uncooked.

and cutting out processed foods means pre-packaged, manufactured foods. making a salad is still eating unprocessed clean food. and if you'd like to argue it isn't then go ahead, but you're just being absurd and argumentative for argument's sake if you do.


Coach Reddy, all he means is that claiming to eat 'clean' or 'unprocessed' foods is a bit of misnomer. And it is. The word 'clean' is not being used in its appropriate context, and any action taken to prepare food for consumption, in any way, means that it has been 'processed'.

No need to get up in arms about symantics(sp?).


what word would you like me to use for my salad if not unprocessed? since the IIFYM crowd seems to get the last word on what is and isn't acceptable terminology, tell me what to say so as not to ruffle your delicate sensibilities...
Edited by CoachReddy On April 12, 2013 1:31 PM
  20419576
April 12, 2013 1:32 PM
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funny because from where I stand, the sadder thing is how many obese people there are in this country because they DON'T eat whole foods. And how many sick people there are in this country because they DO eat pesticide-laden foods.

just me though.


No one is obese "because they don't eat whole foods."


when you don't eat whole foods, you're eating processed foods. when you eat processed foods, unless you track your intake, it's extremely easy to overeat because your stomach doesn't relay that it's full until you've stuffed an insane amount of calories in your face, and if you're doing that, you will become obese.

it's much easier to become fat eating processed foods than whole foods unless you track your intake

the vast majority of people do not track their intake.

is it a direct causal relationship? no. is it a huge, huge factor? yes.


As I have said before, cut carrots ARE processed. Thus Jonnythan's position on elimination of "processed" as it is misused...


haha the problem is people like you view the world in black and white where there are actually shades of grey.

a carrot that has been cut is far less processed than a pop tart. there is a gradient. and the less processed, the more nutritionally beneficial.


Yes, but no one says they are making food choices and switches based on choosing less processed versions or alternatives. No one says, I switched to raw baby carrots instead of candied carrots at my favorite restaurant. They just say they are "eliminating processed foods" or "eating clean" or "eating ____% clean". Which are all BS misleading terms.

Personally I don't think I have eaten so much as 0.00001 completely unprocessed foods in my life, because I tend to cook stuff and am not a zombie noshing on the still living. And I haven't routinely eaten dirty food since I was a small toddler who would put most anything in its mouth.


clean does not mean uncooked. raw means uncooked.

and cutting out processed foods means pre-packaged, manufactured foods. making a salad is still eating unprocessed clean food. and if you'd like to argue it isn't then go ahead, but you're just being absurd and argumentative for argument's sake if you do.


You said the less processed the better.
  6438378
April 12, 2013 1:32 PM
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Quaker Oats with chocolate protein powder mmmm!!


yesss! i get the big canister of plain quick oats and mix in choc protein powder, sometimes pb2 with it. delsih!

but yes like others have posted, unless you live in amish country or eating right off the land, most foods are processed to an extent. as far as the oatmeal though, i think it tastes better if you use plain oats and add in real fruit instead
  18865958

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