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TOPIC: Overnight diet

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April 8, 2013 10:39 AM
Ok, second try since some people seem to think this was an ad and the previous thread disappeared in cyberspace. There were no previous threads about it I just watched it this morning on ABC news and want to ask for knowledgeable people's opinion about it, not just cute comments. Do not tell me oh just another fad diet, without reading about it.

The diet appears to be based on results from a combination of clinical trials and the physicians recommending it are the obesity research directors in the academic hospitals affiliated with Harvard, Boston University and Cornell-Weil medical schools.

These are the links from 2 articles written about it in the Daily Mail newspaper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2298515/Slim-sleep-It-sounds-good-true-But-revolutionary-diet-devised-leading-U-S-doctor-really-CAN-shift-pounds-overnight.html#ixzz2OZL9IwVR

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2302023/Overnight-Diet-Dr-Caroline-Apovian-Stay-fit-forever-24-minute-workout-Last-week-told-slim-sleep.html
April 8, 2013 10:45 AM
You got a lot of decent advice about it in your previous thread. No reason to post again. By the sounds of it you want to do it regardless of who comments on it.

Just because a diet is endorsed or recommended by doctors doesn't mean it's good or healthy.

This diet is nothing special as pointed out in your previous thread. Do it if you want to... but don't expect everyone to be on board.

When something sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Drinking your calories a day a week will not make you burn more fat.

This is ultimately a fad diet. Whether you will see it or not. It's the same as Dukan, South Beach, Slimfast, Shakeology, Body By Vi, Herbalife, Nutrisystem, etc. Any diet that claims you have to eliminate or reduce certain foods or types of food for weight loss is a fad diet. You have no need to cut out any food unless you have a medical reason to do so.

This will not result in long term weight loss.
Edited by thisismeraw On April 8, 2013 10:48 AM
April 8, 2013 10:48 AM
QUOTE:

Ok, second try since some people seem to think this was an ad and the previous thread disappeared in cyberspace. There were no previous threads about it I just watched it this morning on ABC news and want to ask for knowledgeable people's opinion about it, not just cute comments. Do not tell me oh just another fad diet, without reading about it.

The diet appears to be based on results from a combination of clinical trials and the physicians recommending it are the obesity research directors in the academic hospitals affiliated with Harvard, Boston University and Cornell-Weil medical schools.

These are the links from 2 articles written about it in the Daily Mail newspaper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2298515/Slim-sleep-It-sounds-good-true-But-revolutionary-diet-devised-leading-U-S-doctor-really-CAN-shift-pounds-overnight.html#ixzz2OZL9IwVR

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2302023/Overnight-Diet-Dr-Caroline-Apovian-Stay-fit-forever-24-minute-workout-Last-week-told-slim-sleep.html


It's a fad diet and can you please post the links to the clinical trials? Unless of course they were never published and you're taking the word from someone with a financial interest int he matter
April 8, 2013 10:50 AM
Looks like just another fad diet to me as well.
April 8, 2013 10:50 AM
The previous thread disappeared because someone thought it was an ad! I posted to get people's opinion since there are threads for almost every single diet in the forum. I think it is interesting because the Md's recommending it are directors of the obesity programs in the top medical schools and do the clinical research in their hospitals. It is more like the intermittent diet since the one day a week that it recommends fasting, it suggests smoothies to get the macros, and then it is more of a low carb/high protein diet. I am sure that others will come and search for the diet at some point so it would be good to have people's opinion about it.
April 8, 2013 10:51 AM
QUOTE:

The previous thread disappeared because someone thought it was an ad! I posted to get people's opinion since there are threads for almost every single diet in the forum. I think it is interesting because the Md's recommending it are directors of the obesity programs in the top medical schools and do the clinical research in their hospitals. It is more like the intermittent diet since the one day a week that it recommends fasting, it suggests smoothies to get the macros, and then it is more of a low carb/high protein diet. I am sure that others will come and search for the diet at some point so it would be good to have people's opinion about it.


You've gotten opinions about it.

Just because doctors recommend it or are part of obesity stuides doesn't mean it's a good idea. Doctor endorse all sorts of crazy and harmful things.

It is a fad diet.
April 8, 2013 11:02 AM
oops. messed this one up. heehee. look below
Edited by gunnaloseit100 On April 8, 2013 11:04 AM
  41403380
April 8, 2013 11:02 AM
It sounds perfectly healthy to me. I can't think of anything that would inherently make a high protein diet that includes strength training and one day of smoothies only unhealthy. There are many diets based on high protein and meal timing that are healthy.

I thought the articles were interesting.
Edited by bcattoes On April 8, 2013 11:02 AM
April 8, 2013 11:02 AM
it sounds interesting. I wouldn't give the knee jerk reaction to call it a fad diet even tho that is how it is packaged. in a way it is just liquid fasting one day a week. fasting is not a new concept and is not unhealthy. many religions and cultures will incorporate fasting into their lives for other reasons. mental clarity, spiritual enlightenment. it is not asking you to cut food out for long periods of time. I say give it a try. add some yoga. you might be happy with the results and not all of them will be measured on the scale
  41403380
April 8, 2013 11:03 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Ok, second try since some people seem to think this was an ad and the previous thread disappeared in cyberspace. There were no previous threads about it I just watched it this morning on ABC news and want to ask for knowledgeable people's opinion about it, not just cute comments. Do not tell me oh just another fad diet, without reading about it.

The diet appears to be based on results from a combination of clinical trials and the physicians recommending it are the obesity research directors in the academic hospitals affiliated with Harvard, Boston University and Cornell-Weil medical schools.

These are the links from 2 articles written about it in the Daily Mail newspaper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2298515/Slim-sleep-It-sounds-good-true-But-revolutionary-diet-devised-leading-U-S-doctor-really-CAN-shift-pounds-overnight.html#ixzz2OZL9IwVR

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2302023/Overnight-Diet-Dr-Caroline-Apovian-Stay-fit-forever-24-minute-workout-Last-week-told-slim-sleep.html


It's a fad diet and can you please post the links to the clinical trials? Unless of course they were never published and you're taking the word from someone with a financial interest int he matter


What makes it a "fad diet"? And if it is a fad, does that mean it's unhealthy?
April 8, 2013 11:10 AM
QUOTE:


It's a fad diet and can you please post the links to the clinical trials? Unless of course they were never published and you're taking the word from someone with a financial interest int he matter


The book is not out yet so I have not read the details but appears to be based on the principles of-amount of lean muscle in your body is also one of the key influences on your metabolic rate; maintain muscle when you diet; HGH levels, high protein; low carb; get macronutrients and do not starve on fast day. I really do not understand this immediate jump to attack by people here. Some people like food ideas for their meal plan.
April 8, 2013 11:14 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Ok, second try since some people seem to think this was an ad and the previous thread disappeared in cyberspace. There were no previous threads about it I just watched it this morning on ABC news and want to ask for knowledgeable people's opinion about it, not just cute comments. Do not tell me oh just another fad diet, without reading about it.

The diet appears to be based on results from a combination of clinical trials and the physicians recommending it are the obesity research directors in the academic hospitals affiliated with Harvard, Boston University and Cornell-Weil medical schools.

These are the links from 2 articles written about it in the Daily Mail newspaper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2298515/Slim-sleep-It-sounds-good-true-But-revolutionary-diet-devised-leading-U-S-doctor-really-CAN-shift-pounds-overnight.html#ixzz2OZL9IwVR

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2302023/Overnight-Diet-Dr-Caroline-Apovian-Stay-fit-forever-24-minute-workout-Last-week-told-slim-sleep.html


It's a fad diet and can you please post the links to the clinical trials? Unless of course they were never published and you're taking the word from someone with a financial interest int he matter


What makes it a "fad diet"? And if it is a fad, does that mean it's unhealthy?


http://www.overnightdiet.org/
April 8, 2013 11:15 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:


It's a fad diet and can you please post the links to the clinical trials? Unless of course they were never published and you're taking the word from someone with a financial interest int he matter


The book is not out yet so I have not read the details but appears to be based on the principles of-amount of lean muscle in your body is also one of the key influences on your metabolic rate; maintain muscle when you diet; HGH levels, high protein; low carb; get macronutrients and do not starve on fast day. I really do not understand this immediate jump to attack by people here. Some people like food ideas for their meal plan.


Need food ideas for your meal plan? Eat foods you like while maintaining a caloric deficit
April 8, 2013 11:19 AM
Oh no!. The author has solid credentials and I think that she is in the NASA panel that recommends the astronauts' diet for long term missions and being a PI in the CORE are a plus.
http://www.cardiometabolichealth.org/2009/bios/ApovianCaroline.aspor

But of course where everybody will focus is that she is a medical advisor in the Dr. Oz show. That will immediately make her a nobody. Because all of us, the anonymous forum posters are more knowledgeable on everything about diet, weight loss, nutrition, etc.
Edited by Alta2000 On April 8, 2013 11:22 AM
April 8, 2013 11:20 AM
I am generally against any diet that uses the word "jump start" or requires "satisfying smoothies." I have seen enough people around me try and fail with these diets. I would not recommend this.
  35387163
April 8, 2013 11:21 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Ok, second try since some people seem to think this was an ad and the previous thread disappeared in cyberspace. There were no previous threads about it I just watched it this morning on ABC news and want to ask for knowledgeable people's opinion about it, not just cute comments. Do not tell me oh just another fad diet, without reading about it.

The diet appears to be based on results from a combination of clinical trials and the physicians recommending it are the obesity research directors in the academic hospitals affiliated with Harvard, Boston University and Cornell-Weil medical schools.

These are the links from 2 articles written about it in the Daily Mail newspaper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2298515/Slim-sleep-It-sounds-good-true-But-revolutionary-diet-devised-leading-U-S-doctor-really-CAN-shift-pounds-overnight.html#ixzz2OZL9IwVR

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2302023/Overnight-Diet-Dr-Caroline-Apovian-Stay-fit-forever-24-minute-workout-Last-week-told-slim-sleep.html


It's a fad diet and can you please post the links to the clinical trials? Unless of course they were never published and you're taking the word from someone with a financial interest int he matter


What makes it a "fad diet"? And if it is a fad, does that mean it's unhealthy?


http://www.overnightdiet.org/


Wow! Okay, that sensationalism would qualify as "fad diet" in my book. But that does not mean it's unhealthy or won't work. Other diets that work make similar claims. In fact, just about every diet that has a name or specific rules makes similar claims.
April 8, 2013 11:27 AM
QUOTE:

I am generally against any diet that uses the word "jump start" or requires "satisfying smoothies." I have seen enough people around me try and fail with these diets. I would not recommend this.


This is what made me classify it as a fad diet as well.

Losing a bunch of weight due to smoothies and then having to "slowly introduce regular food" back into your diet is complete nonsense.

Eat at a deficit. It's harder and slower. It takes will power.

But once you learn how to do it you're set for life.
April 8, 2013 11:33 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Ok, second try since some people seem to think this was an ad and the previous thread disappeared in cyberspace. There were no previous threads about it I just watched it this morning on ABC news and want to ask for knowledgeable people's opinion about it, not just cute comments. Do not tell me oh just another fad diet, without reading about it.

The diet appears to be based on results from a combination of clinical trials and the physicians recommending it are the obesity research directors in the academic hospitals affiliated with Harvard, Boston University and Cornell-Weil medical schools.

These are the links from 2 articles written about it in the Daily Mail newspaper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2298515/Slim-sleep-It-sounds-good-true-But-revolutionary-diet-devised-leading-U-S-doctor-really-CAN-shift-pounds-overnight.html#ixzz2OZL9IwVR

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2302023/Overnight-Diet-Dr-Caroline-Apovian-Stay-fit-forever-24-minute-workout-Last-week-told-slim-sleep.html


It's a fad diet and can you please post the links to the clinical trials? Unless of course they were never published and you're taking the word from someone with a financial interest int he matter


What makes it a "fad diet"? And if it is a fad, does that mean it's unhealthy?


http://www.overnightdiet.org/


Wow! Okay, that sensationalism would qualify as "fad diet" in my book. But that does not mean it's unhealthy or won't work. Other diets that work make similar claims. In fact, just about every diet that has a name or specific rules makes similar claims.


Fad diets all work and not are all unhealthy, every diet just finds a new and "exciting" way to create a deficit
April 8, 2013 11:37 AM
If it's promising a quick fix or a jump start or boost anything, it's a fad diet.
  3289437
April 8, 2013 11:46 AM
"Claims you can lose 9lb EVERY WEEK by having one 'non-food' day"

I am sure The National Enquier would love this bunch of BS.
  41299147
April 8, 2013 11:48 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Ok, second try since some people seem to think this was an ad and the previous thread disappeared in cyberspace. There were no previous threads about it I just watched it this morning on ABC news and want to ask for knowledgeable people's opinion about it, not just cute comments. Do not tell me oh just another fad diet, without reading about it.

The diet appears to be based on results from a combination of clinical trials and the physicians recommending it are the obesity research directors in the academic hospitals affiliated with Harvard, Boston University and Cornell-Weil medical schools.

These are the links from 2 articles written about it in the Daily Mail newspaper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2298515/Slim-sleep-It-sounds-good-true-But-revolutionary-diet-devised-leading-U-S-doctor-really-CAN-shift-pounds-overnight.html#ixzz2OZL9IwVR

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2302023/Overnight-Diet-Dr-Caroline-Apovian-Stay-fit-forever-24-minute-workout-Last-week-told-slim-sleep.html


It's a fad diet and can you please post the links to the clinical trials? Unless of course they were never published and you're taking the word from someone with a financial interest int he matter


What makes it a "fad diet"? And if it is a fad, does that mean it's unhealthy?


http://www.overnightdiet.org/


Wow! Okay, that sensationalism would qualify as "fad diet" in my book. But that does not mean it's unhealthy or won't work. Other diets that work make similar claims. In fact, just about every diet that has a name or specific rules makes similar claims.


Fad diets all work and not are all unhealthy, every diet just finds a new and "exciting" way to create a deficit


Yeah, that was pretty much my point. Except I don't see why it's a bad thing. If that exciting new way works for someone, I say have at it.
April 8, 2013 11:50 AM
After all the gimmicks, tricks, and "jump starts," you end up at the same spot, so why not just eat at a deficit from the beginning? I guess it's unbelievable that a simple deficit works, hence the magic miracle diet techniques.
  32758085
April 8, 2013 5:30 PM
QUOTE:

After all the gimmicks, tricks, and "jump starts," you end up at the same spot, so why not just eat at a deficit from the beginning? I guess it's unbelievable that a simple deficit works, hence the magic miracle diet techniques.


Some people like a structured diet. Just as some people buy a fixer upper house while others want a house turn key ready, or even fully furnished. You know there are thousands of people who are great cooks but need the weekly email from Martha Stewart or similar websites, with the structured daily meal ideas for the full week. Each person works differently.
April 8, 2013 5:59 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

After all the gimmicks, tricks, and "jump starts," you end up at the same spot, so why not just eat at a deficit from the beginning? I guess it's unbelievable that a simple deficit works, hence the magic miracle diet techniques.


Some people like a structured diet. Just as some people buy a fixer upper house while others want a house turn key ready, or even fully furnished. You know there are thousands of people who are great cooks but need the weekly email from Martha Stewart or similar websites, with the structured daily meal ideas for the full week. Each person works differently.


Some people are skilled and can save money by buying fix up houses. Some people like to buy cookbooks to increase skill in the kitchen (even though you can everything for free on the internet). Some people like to waste money on voodoo books and shakes to get the exact same result as the "boring" (but free, proven knowledge) option of weighing food, counting calories/macros, and exercising. Some people like the sensation and thrill of anything but a sustainable, disciplined approach.
  32758085
April 8, 2013 7:37 PM
I can see why people might think it's a "fad diet" because of the title, but actually, I got my hands on an early copy of the book from my friend who is a blogger, and from what I've read, it seems pretty legit. It's not really meant to be a short term diet, but rather, it's a pretty simple permanent change in your lifestyle--for one day every week, you eat only smoothies, and the other days a week, you eat a regular, high-protein diet. Supposedly the way it works is you drop weight "overnight" on the day you eat only smoothies, but the key is you have to make sure you still consume a lot of protein to conserve your muscle mass. The other important aspect is making sure you get enough sleep. The book has a ton of pretty interesting recipes and smoothie ideas, and the author is a very renowned Dr. who is Director of the Weight Management Program at Boston Medical Center. I think it all sounds pretty good but I'm still trying to work up the motivation to start dieting!
Edited by deerenaldo1980 On April 8, 2013 7:37 PM

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