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TOPIC: Don't eat proteins and carbs in the same meal?

 
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March 22, 2013 12:42 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:



Well then you would put it in success stories and tell us what worked for you.

That's not what you did.

You posted a question in the Food and Nutrition forum. And people have attempted to correct your misconceptions.


I said "IF I was successful I would post it to the success stories"


no, you tried to make it sound like this was a magic diet that was oh-so-successfull because you lost .2 lbs overnight.

i smell a troll.
  3420658
March 22, 2013 12:42 PM
QUOTE:

if you eat a normal dinner, then follow it with a fruit cup.... the fruit will start to rot in your stomach before it gets digested


This is kind of amazing.
  6438378
March 22, 2013 12:43 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

if you eat a normal dinner, then follow it with a fruit cup.... the fruit will start to rot in your stomach before it gets digested


This is kind of amazing.


apparently stomachs don't produce hydrochloric acid to break down food...
  20419576
March 22, 2013 12:43 PM
Isn't milk a source of protein?
March 22, 2013 12:43 PM
Where do people come up with this stuff? And why, oh why, do they feel the need to work this hard at something that is really pretty simple?
  17803963
March 22, 2013 12:43 PM
My sister did that diet once many years ago, or at least it sounds like the diet she did. She lost weight. Then she went off the diet and gained it back. So, I'd say there is nothing wrong with it if it helps you stay on track and you feel like it's something you can do forever. You could certainly get proper nutrition on it. But if you don't think you can stick with it forever, you might want to find something else.

One question: Wouldn't cereal with regular milk be a no-no since milk contains protein and cereal is mostly carbs? You might want to consider almond milk since it has very little protein.
March 22, 2013 12:45 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

What the hell is a "neutral food"? Doesn't everything have some level of one of the three major macros: carbs, protein, and/or fat?


Swiss Cheese?


You win.
March 22, 2013 12:45 PM
QUOTE:

1) I am replying because I want to help.

2) This diet is 100% nonsense. Calorie and nutrient intake does matter. How you combine them on a per meal basis does not.

3) I am telling you that it is nonsense because you are placing a restriction on your eating habits and this restriction is not doing anything to help you achieve your goal. If I told you you HAD to wear red shoes and sit on a bag of potatoes every time you eat, and you also have to eat at a caloric deficit, you would lose weight. But you would lose weight because of the caloric deficit, not because of the red shoes or the bag of potatoes.

It is for this reason that I believe it is important to write this post.

Best of luck to you.



^^^BEST advice right THERE^^^
March 22, 2013 12:46 PM
Many years ago I read a book called "Fit for Life" that proposed that you do not combine
proteins and starches in the same meal. The theory was put forth that animal based protein
takes one form of stomach acid to digest, while starches take another. combining the two at a single meal
is what led to feeling tired after eating. It also proposed that I not eat any fruit with any meal, but keep them separate as well. It made sense and I tried it. The book had plenty of starch neutral foods that I could eat at the same time as I ate animal based protein or starches. I lost weight, but I had also upped my exercise and dropped the size of my portions.

Looking at the myriad of diet fads that I have tried, it seems the key that is common to them all is this.
"East less, exercise more."
If you are feeling satisfied eating this way, and you are seeing results, then by all means continue to eat this way.
  39809575
March 22, 2013 12:46 PM
QUOTE:

My sister did that diet once many years ago, or at least it sounds like the diet she did. She lost weight. Then she went off the diet and gained it back. So, I'd say there is nothing wrong with it if it helps you stay on track and you feel like it's something you can do forever. You could certainly get proper nutrition on it. But if you don't think you can stick with it forever, you might want to find something else.

One question: Wouldn't cereal with regular milk be a no-no since milk contains protein and cereal is mostly carbs? You might want to consider almond milk since it has very little protein.


no, apparently it's a "neutral" food, whatever that is.
  3420658
March 22, 2013 12:46 PM
Thanks, I am learning a lot from you guys.
March 22, 2013 12:48 PM
QUOTE:

if you eat a normal dinner, then follow it with a fruit cup.... the fruit will start to rot in your stomach before it gets digested




Image not displayed

ETA to fix quotes
Edited by magerum On March 22, 2013 12:49 PM
  7584267
March 22, 2013 12:48 PM
Not sure if trolling or genuinely hard-headed. If the former, stellar job. GO psuedo-science. The forums would be a ghost town without you. Seriously WTF is a "neutral" food?
Edited by daybehavior On March 22, 2013 12:49 PM
  2766681
March 22, 2013 12:49 PM
QUOTE:
And most of all, I KNOW my body and if I eat over 1800 calories a day... I gain weight. I have had my thyroid checked, it is fine. Not every body is the same regardless of what others think. I have a very slow metabolism but I am trying to boost it by doing strength training not just cardio, which I do also.


OP, did you have testing done to determine BMR or RMR? If you are obese, doing cardio and strength training, it is very likely that your TDEE is much higher, so you could eat more and have success losing fat. Do you know your numbers? BMR, TDEE, BF%? Curious how you know for sure 1800 is your maintenance? Feel free to PM ke if you want.

Also, I recommend reading IPOARM: http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/654536-in-place-of-a-road-map-2-0-revised-7-2-12 . This may help you understand macros, BMR, TDEE and the such.
  15955374
March 22, 2013 12:50 PM
QUOTE:

Isn't milk a source of protein?


And fat.. and carbs...
  6438378
March 22, 2013 12:50 PM
I've actually heard to do the opposite. Since protein takes longer to digest, mixing it with your carbs also slows the digestion of carbs and prevents spikes in blood sugar & helps keep you full longer.

I'm not a dietician so I do not know how accurate that is.
  15088334
March 22, 2013 12:51 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Isn't milk a source of protein?


And fat.. and carbs...


Primarily fat...
  7584267
March 22, 2013 12:51 PM
QUOTE:

If I am successful with this way of eating and it helps me to lose the weight, I will post a success story. I am not considering this to be a diet, I am considering it to be a change of the way I eat. If anyone looked at the chart that I posted the link for then you would know that the carbs not to mix with protein are the starches and sugars.


I asked earlier, but it probably got lost in the rest of the comments. :)

Do you have citations for your claim that one should not mix protein and carbs, and that doing so causes digestion and absorption to take longer when one does?

I'd really like to see the science behind this. I think linking peer reviewed data would do a lot to clarify what others are saying, and what you are saying with regards to this diet. :)
March 22, 2013 12:54 PM
QUOTE:

Image not displayed


laugh
  10825235
March 22, 2013 12:56 PM
OP - every story has two sides, and a quick google found a few reasons to ensure that eating carbs and protein together makes a lot of sense - well once you understand a bit about insulin and weight loss - actually a lot more sense than the separation diet

http://www.theloveconsultants.com/index.php/blog/article/lose_weight_by_combining_protein_and_carbs_at_every_meal/Christine%20Bybee

"As with most successful couples it’s all about the chemistry. Here’s why a protein/carb combo is a match made in heaven: Your blood sugar is stable when insulin and glucagon (two hormones courtesy of your pancreas) are balanced. Think of “insulin” and “glucagon” as the yin and yang of stable blood sugar. Your pancreas churns out both of these hormones in response to the kinds of foods you eat.

So, eating carbs causes the production of insulin. Eating protein causes the production of glucagon. Simply put, insulin enables your body to store glucose for energy later; whereas glucagon helps your body tap into those stores when necessary.

In addition, pairing protein with carbs helps the glucose from the carbs move more slowly through the bloodstream. Think about it: If your car is the only car on the highway, you’ll zip by. If you have to compete with traffic, you’ll move more slowly toward your destination.

The same goes for glucose working its way through your blood stream. Eating protein along with carbs fills the blood stream with traffic that slows down the glucose. And the slower glucose moves through the bloodstream, the better. If it moves through too quickly, your blood sugar levels will dip and you’ll be tormented by sugar cravings and find yourself in a slump."

http://healthyfood-ridho.blogspot.co.nz/2011/12/fact-or-fiction-dont-eat-protein-and.html

In the end of the day each of us here make our own choices on what believe works for us - but - that does not mean every one else is magically going to agree with you - as you just saw - and rightly so - the combined "we" feel a strong responsibility to all the newer and less MFP savvy folks to make sure that one persons "snake oil" does not become gospel...

Just think of it - the Hay Diet" has apparently been around since 1930 - if it was so groundbreaking why on earth are there still obese people around - wow - if it was as easy as " food separation" governments would save billions of dollars - just make a law that restaurants can't serve cooked meat and potatoes in the same meal .....

Good luck on your quest for the healthy you - do what works for you :-)
  6365234
March 22, 2013 1:00 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

My sister did that diet once many years ago, or at least it sounds like the diet she did. She lost weight. Then she went off the diet and gained it back. So, I'd say there is nothing wrong with it if it helps you stay on track and you feel like it's something you can do forever. You could certainly get proper nutrition on it. But if you don't think you can stick with it forever, you might want to find something else.

One question: Wouldn't cereal with regular milk be a no-no since milk contains protein and cereal is mostly carbs? You might want to consider almond milk since it has very little protein.


no, apparently it's a "neutral" food, whatever that is.


Interesting thing - according to the chart OP linked to it is not actually a "neutral" - bit confused - but it might just be because I am blonde......
http://www.colonhealthinfo.com/diet/separation_diet.htm
  6365234
March 22, 2013 1:00 PM
The thing I don't like about these kinds of things is that even if you say "If it works for you, then do it," well do you want to keep doing that the rest of your life if it works for you? Weight loss and health is a lifelong battle. People are saying that you do not need to go through these pain in the butt diets to lose weight. You will eventually get burnt out and I believe that this causes a lot of people to give up. Just watch what you eat and exercise. If this didn't work for you before you may just need to give it time and tweak a few things. Goodluck with your journey =)
  8600848
March 22, 2013 1:01 PM
Who the eff told you this QUACKERY?
March 22, 2013 1:01 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

What the hell is a "neutral food"? Doesn't everything have some level of one of the three major macros: carbs, protein, and/or fat?


Swiss Cheese?


You win.


Nice sword
March 22, 2013 1:07 PM
QUOTE:

if you eat a normal dinner, then follow it with a fruit cup.... the fruit will start to rot in your stomach before it gets digested


I eat fruit with almost every meal. In fact, nearly every meal I eat is a combo of lean protein, some veggie, some carbohydrate, and fruit, although occasionally one of those pieces will drop out of the mix. The only time I have digestion issues, in general, is when I eat and then lay down... acid reflux.

But, certainly, if your digestive system just doesn't do well mixing foods up, then I would certainly avoid it.
Edited by darlilama On March 22, 2013 1:07 PM
  9727825

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