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TOPIC: How to target back fat?

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March 6, 2013 8:09 AM
Just......IN
Edited by ShellyBell999 On March 6, 2013 8:17 AM
March 6, 2013 8:11 AM
QUOTE:

Do whatever cbcbrass98 did! Image not displayed

Hell yea!


Awe... thanks!!blushing
March 6, 2013 8:13 AM
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QUOTE:

QUOTE:

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love No back fat there! Probably no front fat either! flowerforyou


I hope there is some front fat (BOOBS)


ROFL! You guys are cracking me up.
March 6, 2013 8:20 AM
Sometimes you just have to let people go......


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March 6, 2013 8:21 AM
IT ROLLED!!

day = made
  4784575
March 6, 2013 8:28 AM
Bump
March 6, 2013 8:30 AM
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  12837362
March 6, 2013 8:32 AM
My only contribution to this.......It would be so much better if this thread was about fatback. Ahhhh....I miss the south.

Fatback is a cut of meat from a domestic pig. It consists of the layer of adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat) under the skin of the back, with or without the skin (pork rind). Fatback is "hard fat", distinct from the visceral fat that occurs in the abdominal cavity and is called "soft fat" and leaf lard.

Like other types of pig fat, fatback may be rendered to make a high quality lard, and is one source of salt pork. Finely diced or coarsely ground fatback is an important ingredient in sausage making and in some meat dishes.

Fatback is an important element of traditional charcuterie. In several European cultures it is used to make specialty bacon. Containing no skeletal muscle, this bacon is a delicacy.

At one time fatback was Italy's basic cooking fat, especially in regions where olive trees are sparse or absent, but health concerns have reduced its popularity. However, it provides a rich, authentic flavour for the classic battuto – sautéed vegetables, herbs and flavourings – that forms the basis of many traditional dishes. Nowadays, pancetta is often used instead.
Edited by PhotogNerd On March 6, 2013 8:35 AM
March 6, 2013 8:35 AM
QUOTE:

My only contribution to this.......It would so much better if this thread was about fatback. Ahhhh....I miss the south.

Fatback is a cut of meat from a domestic pig. It consists of the layer of adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat) under the skin of the back, with or without the skin (pork rind). Fatback is "hard fat", distinct from the visceral fat that occurs in the abdominal cavity and is called "soft fat" and leaf lard.

Like other types of pig fat, fatback may be rendered to make a high quality lard, and is one source of salt pork. Finely diced or coarsely ground fatback is an important ingredient in sausage making and in some meat dishes.

Fatback is an important element of traditional charcuterie. In several European cultures it is used to make specialty bacon. Containing no skeletal muscle, this bacon is a delicacy.

At one time fatback was Italy's basic cooking fat, especially in regions where olive trees are sparse or absent, but health concerns have reduced its popularity. However, it provides a rich, authentic flavour for the classic battuto – sautéed vegetables, herbs and flavourings – that forms the basis of many traditional dishes. Nowadays, pancetta is often used instead.


All I got from this was 'bacon, **** yeah!'
  15135880
March 6, 2013 8:36 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

My only contribution to this.......It would so much better if this thread was about fatback. Ahhhh....I miss the south.

Fatback is a cut of meat from a domestic pig. It consists of the layer of adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat) under the skin of the back, with or without the skin (pork rind). Fatback is "hard fat", distinct from the visceral fat that occurs in the abdominal cavity and is called "soft fat" and leaf lard.

Like other types of pig fat, fatback may be rendered to make a high quality lard, and is one source of salt pork. Finely diced or coarsely ground fatback is an important ingredient in sausage making and in some meat dishes.

Fatback is an important element of traditional charcuterie. In several European cultures it is used to make specialty bacon. Containing no skeletal muscle, this bacon is a delicacy.

At one time fatback was Italy's basic cooking fat, especially in regions where olive trees are sparse or absent, but health concerns have reduced its popularity. However, it provides a rich, authentic flavour for the classic battuto – sautéed vegetables, herbs and flavourings – that forms the basis of many traditional dishes. Nowadays, pancetta is often used instead.


All I got from this was 'bacon, **** yeah!'


hmmm....bacon.....eating some right now!
March 6, 2013 8:37 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

My only contribution to this.......It would so much better if this thread was about fatback. Ahhhh....I miss the south.

Fatback is a cut of meat from a domestic pig. It consists of the layer of adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat) under the skin of the back, with or without the skin (pork rind). Fatback is "hard fat", distinct from the visceral fat that occurs in the abdominal cavity and is called "soft fat" and leaf lard.

Like other types of pig fat, fatback may be rendered to make a high quality lard, and is one source of salt pork. Finely diced or coarsely ground fatback is an important ingredient in sausage making and in some meat dishes.

Fatback is an important element of traditional charcuterie. In several European cultures it is used to make specialty bacon. Containing no skeletal muscle, this bacon is a delicacy.

At one time fatback was Italy's basic cooking fat, especially in regions where olive trees are sparse or absent, but health concerns have reduced its popularity. However, it provides a rich, authentic flavour for the classic battuto – sautéed vegetables, herbs and flavourings – that forms the basis of many traditional dishes. Nowadays, pancetta is often used instead.


All I got from this was 'bacon, **** yeah!'



Essentially that was my point.....I was trying to live up to the nerd part of my username and look smartical.
March 6, 2013 8:42 AM
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QUOTE:

In to learn more about how to deal with this problem area. I'm still waiting for someone to give some good advice that actually makes sense and not just some "appropriate calorie deficit and strength training" nonsense.

Pfft...as if that's the answer to this kind of problem.

flowerforyou


Obvious answer is get a unicorn. Riding unicorns targets back fat. Geesh.


Off to walmart to get a unicorn!laugh
  994999
March 6, 2013 8:52 AM
How did this thread ever roll and keep going?

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  5288645
March 6, 2013 8:55 AM
did i hear bacon?
  12484167
March 6, 2013 8:56 AM
QUOTE:

did i hear bacon?


*looks around* In for the bacon!!!
March 6, 2013 9:07 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

did i hear bacon?


*looks around* In for the bacon!!!


Image not displayed
March 6, 2013 9:16 AM
Dear Posters,

I have locked this topic, having already removed a great number of posts that were reported by the community and were violations of our community guidelines. The original poster has received a significant amount of feedback, and I appreciate those folks who took the time and made the effort to provide constructive advice in response to the OP.

Several of you have heard directly from me, but I ask that everyone please keep in mind when posting in our forums:
QUOTE:

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Message Boards » Fitness and Exercise

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