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TOPIC: Pregnancy weight gain.......some are gaining too much

 
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February 16, 2013 7:20 AM
QUOTE:

You also might want to avoid taking about your pregnant wife nagging you when you go on to say she had a pregnancy filled with complications and medical procedures like cervical curettage. More than anything that makes you look foolish and betrays that you really have no empathy.
Hmmm, I guess women look at sarcasm a lot harsher than men do. I'm fully aware of why my wife was speaking the way she was and how disappointed she was about having to stay in bed 20 out of 24 hours a day. She apologized to me later about being so *****y through the whole thing and I told her that no apology was necessary and really did wish that I could have burdened some of the issues she was going through. And if we had to do it all over again for another child and she's game, then so am I.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  9285851
February 16, 2013 8:32 AM
Seriously - the mods need to ban this guy or close his thread. He doesn't have the balls to quote and answer my post but private messages me instead. What a piece of work.

Honestly, I would have thought nothing about what you said but your post is full of assumptions.

One, that everyone posting on MFP is American. Thankfully a lot of us are not American and are not as obese/overweight.. Secondly, you go by BMI. I have been incredibly skinny in young adulthood before having children and still had a BMI that was considered in the "Overweight" category. As a trainer, you must know that one cannot solely use BMI as a means for indicating one's health.. you can have a BMI of 28 and be completely muscular at the same time.

I agree with some of what you say cause some women make it a free for all but your one situation fits all is kinda offensive. Everyone's body and pregnancy is different. Starting a thread directed at pregnant women and individual weight gain is not that helpful - either give your advice to people who ask for it or will pay for it.
Edited by dixiewhiskey On February 16, 2013 9:01 AM
  19593344
February 16, 2013 9:07 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

You also might want to avoid taking about your pregnant wife nagging you when you go on to say she had a pregnancy filled with complications and medical procedures like cervical curettage. More than anything that makes you look foolish and betrays that you really have no empathy.
Hmmm, I guess women look at sarcasm a lot harsher than men do. I'm fully aware of why my wife was speaking the way she was and how disappointed she was about having to stay in bed 20 out of 24 hours a day. She apologized to me later about being so *****y through the whole thing and I told her that no apology was necessary and really did wish that I could have burdened some of the issues she was going through. And if we had to do it all over again for another child and she's game, then so am I.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition



How very big of you, OP.
February 16, 2013 9:14 AM
I haven't read through all the pages, but I'm sure someone has to have brought up the fact that difficult or complicated pregnancies, no matter how well a woman eats, can affect her weight gain. If you have complications and simply can't be as active, or are even on bedrest, or suffering from other issues, no matter how well you may eat, you are going to gain more weight than probably desired. It is just entirely too presumptuous for someone to look at any pregnant woman and just make a blanket statement and say they are eating too much or gaining too much. Unless you are their doctor, or close enough to them to be intimately privy to the exact details of their pregnancy and life in general, you have no clue and no right to make any guess, presumption, or statement about what you even think is probably going on with them. So, in the matters of other people's pregnancies...the best policy, keep your mouth shut.
  17580581
February 16, 2013 9:20 AM
As long as your doctor says that your pregnancy is healthy, why should it matter how much weight a woman gains? It's not like we treat overweight people poorly....

Oh ... I see.
February 16, 2013 9:30 AM
I don't understand why everyone is so riled about someone making a post on this topic. Society has a vested interest in babies being born healthy, and in their mothers being healthy. Many here seem to be taking this really personally. Maybe it's not necessarily OP's business when it comes to individual pregnant women, sure, but really half the forum posts people start here are about things that aren't their business, like what other people are doing at the gym, etc.

Personally I always looked at pregnancy as a time to be extra careful to eat only the most healthy food because I wanted to give my kids the best, healthiest start in life. I didn't touch fast food or added sugar for the whole 9 months. I was able to be back working out 2 days after coming home from the hospital and ran a half marathon 2 months later. It's certainly not for everyone but it's the way I prefer to do it.
February 16, 2013 9:42 AM
QUOTE:

I don't understand why everyone is so riled about someone making a post on this topic. Society has a vested interest in babies being born healthy, and in their mothers being healthy. Many here seem to be taking this really personally. Maybe it's not necessarily OP's business when it comes to individual pregnant women, sure, but really half the forum posts people start here are about things that aren't their business, like what other people are doing at the gym, etc.

Personally I always looked at pregnancy as a time to be extra careful to eat only the most healthy food because I wanted to give my kids the best, healthiest start in life. I didn't touch fast food or added sugar for the whole 9 months. I was able to be back working out 2 days after coming home from the hospital and ran a half marathon 2 months later. It's certainly not for everyone but it's the way I prefer to do it.


Because it didn't occur to him that the women in his doctor's office he was judging had difficult pregnancies/medical issues that cause them to gain more weight than ideal or that they were overweight to begin with? Maybe some saw it as a continuation of society pressure to live up to some arbitrary standard?

Not gaining too much weight isn't the sole factor for a healthy pregnancy. Should women be diligent in taking care of themselves? Yes. Should we judge how "good" of a job they did carrying their children by their weight? No.

It's lovely you chose to handle your pregnancies the way you did. I had severe morning sickness the entire duration of my pregnancy. I gained 13 pounds - most of that came from Arby's turkey sandwiches and ginger ale because that was literally the ONLY things that didn't make me vomit uncontrollably. My baby was a healthy weight. I had the shortest labor you can imagine and was back to normal entirely within a week.

LOTS of things factor into a pregnancy besides food consumption that contribute to weight gain. Lots of things besides weight factor into health.
Edited by itsfuntobenormal On February 16, 2013 9:48 AM
February 16, 2013 9:50 AM
No one has even brought up emergency c-sections which drastically affect when a Mom can start working out.. this is why this kind of "advice" should be given by a doctor, not a personal trainer, not other mommies from the internet. What you do in your pregnancy is completely different from the next. Not everyone can be perfect like ninerbuff (who isn't a female btw) and RiannonC who probably didn't have any serious complications in her pregnancy. Guaranteed if I printed some of these posts and took them to OB-GYNs across my country, they would highly recommend not to follow any of the BS posted here.
  19593344
February 16, 2013 9:56 AM
While it would be nice to get back and run a marathon 2 months after having a baby, not all moms are like that. I have seen women on MFP being given the advice to try and lose weight regardless of their doctor's orders. Some women really are very uneducated on how they should be eating. I am sure the OP is very knowledgeable, but honestly, I face so much pressure every single day being pregnant that I don't really care to hear what he has to say. I am lucky enough that I have kept my weight down and been able to have a healthy pregnancy. But I still get jokes from people along the lines of "Oh you really are eating again?" or "You know eating for two is wrong." and these people don't have the slightest clue of how much I really eat. They see my size and think what they want. It seems like everyone and their mother wants to tell me how to eat, exercise and how often to do these things. Those women may have had gestational diabetes, could have been on bed rest the entire time. No one really knows.

And as supportive as men think they are, they have no freaking clue. If I had a dollar for every time my fiance said "How hard can it really be?" I could retire tomorrow. Pregnancy isn't a walk in the park, and for some women, they don't receive the support they need. Maybe a little less judgement would be appreciated.

At the other end of the spectrum, being obese and pregnant can cause serious complications during pregnancy and at birth. I don't think it is ever appropriate to use pregnancy as an excuse to eat like crap 24/7.
Edited by MikkimeowCHANGEDjk On February 16, 2013 9:58 AM
February 16, 2013 9:59 AM
QUOTE:

I don't understand why everyone is so riled about someone making a post on this topic. Society has a vested interest in babies being born healthy, and in their mothers being healthy. Many here seem to be taking this really personally. Maybe it's not necessarily OP's business when it comes to individual pregnant women, sure, but really half the forum posts people start here are about things that aren't their business, like what other people are doing at the gym, etc.

Personally I always looked at pregnancy as a time to be extra careful to eat only the most healthy food because I wanted to give my kids the best, healthiest start in life. I didn't touch fast food or added sugar for the whole 9 months. I was able to be back working out 2 days after coming home from the hospital and ran a half marathon 2 months later. It's certainly not for everyone but it's the way I prefer to do it.


Because even though a woman can do that, eat like that, she can still gain more weight. It really isn't anyone else's business. Oh, and btw, I could do that with my first 2 as well. Bully for you. Doesn't mean anything though. Not all pregnancies are the same.

For example. I haven't really eaten any different for any of my pregnancies. I've never been one to crave sweets so that was never a worry, in fact, my cravings have always been things like salads and orange juice and the like, throw in tacos for good measure. Now, first pregnancy, gain of 18lbs, loss of 20 when she was born. Second, gain of 22lbs, lost it all when she was born. Third, difficult pregnancy with a lot of pain issues which actually resulted in emergency c-section, gain of 40lbs (which I could never figure out how I was gaining that much), lost none when he was born. Fourth, also complications (started as twins, uterine tear, lost one, bedrest and so on) gain of about 25 to 30, again no loss when born. I just ballooned up. It wasn't that I wasn't trying to take care of myself or eat healthy, but the particular pregnancies were just hard on my body. Age also has a lot to do with it. I was much younger with my first two as well.

When someone comes along and makes judgments about how much women gain during pregnancy when they really have no clue the variety of issues each and every woman could be facing, it's just rude. To make this original claim based off a room of pregnant women the OP knows nothing about...I mean...come on.
  17580581
February 16, 2013 10:05 AM
QUOTE:

While it would be nice to get back and run a marathon 2 months after having a baby, not all moms are like that. I have seen women on MFP being given the advice to try and lose weight regardless of their doctor's orders. Some women really are very uneducated on how they should be eating. I am sure the OP is very knowledgeable, but honestly, I face so much pressure every single day being pregnant that I don't really care to hear what he has to say. I am lucky enough that I have kept my weight down and been able to have a healthy pregnancy. But I still get jokes from people along the lines of "Oh you really are eating again?" or "You know eating for two is wrong." and these people don't have the slightest clue of how much I really eat. They see my size and think what they want. It seems like everyone and their mother wants to tell me how to eat, exercise and how often to do these things. Those women may have had gestational diabetes, could have been on bed rest the entire time. No one really knows.

And as supportive as men think they are, they have no freaking clue. If I had a dollar for every time my fiance said "How hard can it really be?" I could retire tomorrow. Pregnancy isn't a walk in the park, and for some women, they don't receive the support they need. Maybe a little less judgement would be appreciated.

At the other end of the spectrum, being obese and pregnant can cause serious complications during pregnancy and at birth. I don't think it is ever appropriate to use pregnancy as an excuse to eat like crap 24/7.


Agreed!
  19593344
February 16, 2013 10:06 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I don't understand why everyone is so riled about someone making a post on this topic. Society has a vested interest in babies being born healthy, and in their mothers being healthy. Many here seem to be taking this really personally. Maybe it's not necessarily OP's business when it comes to individual pregnant women, sure, but really half the forum posts people start here are about things that aren't their business, like what other people are doing at the gym, etc.

Personally I always looked at pregnancy as a time to be extra careful to eat only the most healthy food because I wanted to give my kids the best, healthiest start in life. I didn't touch fast food or added sugar for the whole 9 months. I was able to be back working out 2 days after coming home from the hospital and ran a half marathon 2 months later. It's certainly not for everyone but it's the way I prefer to do it.


Because even though a woman can do that, eat like that, she can still gain more weight. It really isn't anyone else's business. Oh, and btw, I could do that with my first 2 as well. Bully for you. Doesn't mean anything though. Not all pregnancies are the same.

For example. I haven't really eaten any different for any of my pregnancies. I've never been one to crave sweets so that was never a worry, in fact, my cravings have always been things like salads and orange juice and the like, throw in tacos for good measure. Now, first pregnancy, gain of 18lbs, loss of 20 when she was born. Second, gain of 22lbs, lost it all when she was born. Third, difficult pregnancy with a lot of pain issues which actually resulted in emergency c-section, gain of 40lbs (which I could never figure out how I was gaining that much), lost none when he was born. Fourth, also complications (started as twins, uterine tear, lost one, bedrest and so on) gain of about 25 to 30, again no loss when born. I just ballooned up. It wasn't that I wasn't trying to take care of myself or eat healthy, but the particular pregnancies were just hard on my body. Age also has a lot to do with it. I was much younger with my first two as well.

When someone comes along and makes judgments about how much women gain during pregnancy when they really have no clue the variety of issues each and every woman could be facing, it's just rude. To make this original claim based off a room of pregnant women the OP knows nothing about...I mean...come on.


Also agreed.
  19593344
February 16, 2013 11:09 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I don't understand why everyone is so riled about someone making a post on this topic. Society has a vested interest in babies being born healthy, and in their mothers being healthy. Many here seem to be taking this really personally. Maybe it's not necessarily OP's business when it comes to individual pregnant women, sure, but really half the forum posts people start here are about things that aren't their business, like what other people are doing at the gym, etc.

Personally I always looked at pregnancy as a time to be extra careful to eat only the most healthy food because I wanted to give my kids the best, healthiest start in life. I didn't touch fast food or added sugar for the whole 9 months. I was able to be back working out 2 days after coming home from the hospital and ran a half marathon 2 months later. It's certainly not for everyone but it's the way I prefer to do it.


Because even though a woman can do that, eat like that, she can still gain more weight. It really isn't anyone else's business. Oh, and btw, I could do that with my first 2 as well. Bully for you. Doesn't mean anything though. Not all pregnancies are the same.

For example. I haven't really eaten any different for any of my pregnancies. I've never been one to crave sweets so that was never a worry, in fact, my cravings have always been things like salads and orange juice and the like, throw in tacos for good measure. Now, first pregnancy, gain of 18lbs, loss of 20 when she was born. Second, gain of 22lbs, lost it all when she was born. Third, difficult pregnancy with a lot of pain issues which actually resulted in emergency c-section, gain of 40lbs (which I could never figure out how I was gaining that much), lost none when he was born. Fourth, also complications (started as twins, uterine tear, lost one, bedrest and so on) gain of about 25 to 30, again no loss when born. I just ballooned up. It wasn't that I wasn't trying to take care of myself or eat healthy, but the particular pregnancies were just hard on my body. Age also has a lot to do with it. I was much younger with my first two as well.

When someone comes along and makes judgments about how much women gain during pregnancy when they really have no clue the variety of issues each and every woman could be facing, it's just rude. To make this original claim based off a room of pregnant women the OP knows nothing about...I mean...come on.


I disagree that an extra fast recovery from delivery means nothing. I mean yes, recovery times can vary and there are plenty of other factors, but if you maintain a healthier lifestyle you are more likely to have a better recovery. Of course there are exceptions and special cases. All we can do is our best.

I agree that OP knew nothing about the women in that room but it didn't sound like he was judging them individually as much as he wanted to express concern about the growing trend of overweight moms to be in our country. Pregnancy weight gain has certainly risen over the years and it's not as good for the moms or the babies. Maybe he did mean it in a judgy way and I interpreted it wrong. But that's not how it came across to me. As I said I agree that it's no one's business on an individual level but it is a societal trend to be concerned about. And people have been saying things like "everyone knows you're not supposed to have a free for all with your diet while pregnant" but some people really don't know. I've met plenty.
February 16, 2013 11:56 AM
I'm surprised this thread is still going!
February 16, 2013 1:13 PM
QUOTE:

Seriously - the mods need to ban this guy or close his thread. He doesn't have the balls to quote and answer my post but private messages me instead. What a piece of work.
The question I PM'd you with was personal info on you. Not for a public forum to read. I was respecting your privacy. Not that it seems you really care about it now.

QUOTE:
Honestly, I would have thought nothing about what you said but your post is full of assumptions.
Which I admitted to on the first couple of posts.

QUOTE:
One, that everyone posting on MFP is American. Thankfully a lot of us are not American and are not as obese/overweight.. Secondly, you go by BMI. I have been incredibly skinny in young adulthood before having children and still had a BMI that was considered in the "Overweight" category. As a trainer, you must know that one cannot solely use BMI as a means for indicating one's health.. you can have a BMI of 28 and be completely muscular at the same time.

I agree with some of what you say cause some women make it a free for all but your one situation fits all is kinda offensive. Everyone's body and pregnancy is different. Starting a thread directed at pregnant women and individual weight gain is not that helpful - either give your advice to people who ask for it or will pay for it.
The information I've stated isn't MINE. I took it from links that provide information on pregnancy.
As for BMI, I don't like to use it. I feel it's an inaccurate way of body measurement. However if you did read from the beginning, my statement about it was relating to how DOCTORS' recommendation for BMI for females wanting to conceive.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  9285851
February 16, 2013 1:16 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

You also might want to avoid taking about your pregnant wife nagging you when you go on to say she had a pregnancy filled with complications and medical procedures like cervical curettage. More than anything that makes you look foolish and betrays that you really have no empathy.
Hmmm, I guess women look at sarcasm a lot harsher than men do. I'm fully aware of why my wife was speaking the way she was and how disappointed she was about having to stay in bed 20 out of 24 hours a day. She apologized to me later about being so *****y through the whole thing and I told her that no apology was necessary and really did wish that I could have burdened some of the issues she was going through. And if we had to do it all over again for another child and she's game, then so am I.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition



How very big of you, OP.
Did I mention my MIL stayed with us for 3 of those months?laugh

Actually I really love my inlaws and would rather hang out with family than friends.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  9285851
February 16, 2013 1:26 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I've always been curious to know why it's okay to fat bash obese women, expect them to be size 2s, yet if their spouses are obese slobs, nobody gives them a second look or even comments about THEIR obesity?

Because fat men are funny? Somehow more protective? Little "Santa Clauses" in disguise?

obese women = gross, horrible, icky, eww, avert the eyes!

obese men = charming, funny, lovable, fun to be with!

Thoughts?
I'm sure many obese men would chime in if they saw this. I can't think of any obese men who are happy with their weight. They may be funny and joke around to deflect how they feel and are then associated with being fun happy charming.
And obese men get as many "ewwwws" and "grosses" as females do. Possible that you don't hear it as much.
I will say though that if an obese male was rich, it would be much easier for him to draw women, than an obese woman trying to draw men.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition




Hold up. Now women can't be overweight especially when carrying an unborn child, nag too much AND are gold diggers. Anything else you would like to add?

You want some qualifications?
Bachelor of psychology, honour in arts major feminist studies
Seven years working with a woman's health centre in domestic violence prevention
Three years in child protection

And as for child protection goes, there is so much more to be concerned about during pregnancy than a woman's weight. Do my job for a while and see babies drug withdrawing or babies with no place to go because mum is in jail. There is a woman currently 26 weeks pregnant and weighs 32kg (approx 75 pound). Give me an overweight, loving mum any day!

The only time ever in my role can I judge weight is when a child is obese. The protocol is you ask the story and then put in ways to help. See that, I ask and then help. Not judge and then get on my high horse and rant online. Fact of the matter is you saw those women at the doctors. Maybe they were concerned about their weight and wanted to discuss it or maybe they had health issues. They were there to see a medical professional not some judgemental trainer in the waiting room. You may work as a trainer attached to a hospital but that doesn't make you a doctor. I work in the same building as a police station and I am not an expert in law enforcement.

I just saw that you wrote this on another thread:
I forget sometimes how lucky I am that I can put my hands on other females bodies and not have them retract in fear. This is all for spotting, massage and stretching of course.

You need some serious help in how to respect women.
Edited by elizak87 On February 16, 2013 1:53 PM
  28834057
February 16, 2013 1:55 PM
QUOTE:

Hold up. Now women can't be overweight especially when carrying an unborn child, nag too much AND are gold diggers. Anything else you would like to add?
So I can't generalize, but it's fine if you do?

QUOTE:
You want some qualifications?
Bachelor of psychology, honour in arts major feminist studies
Seven years working with a woman's health centre in domestic violence prevention
Three years in child protection
I gonna take a stab at the dark here and say that males are the main perps you're against here. Makes sense now.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  9285851
February 16, 2013 2:05 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Hold up. Now women can't be overweight especially when carrying an unborn child, nag too much AND are gold diggers. Anything else you would like to add?
So I can't generalize, but it's fine if you do?

QUOTE:
You want some qualifications?
Bachelor of psychology, honour in arts major feminist studies
Seven years working with a woman's health centre in domestic violence prevention
Three years in child protection
I gonna take a stab at the dark here and say that males are the main perps you're against here. Makes sense now.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition




When did I generalise?
I work with female perps too but yes the majority are male perps. I get my referrals from police reports, aka facts. So what exactly makes sense you now? That I perhaps am a strong woman who won't put up with sexism and stands up for women as a feminist? Or are you about to label me as a 'man basher'? Since this thread started I have discussed it with my (male) partner who also sees you as being judgemental and harsh towards pregnant women.
  28834057
February 16, 2013 2:17 PM
Regardless of pregnancy, you are still picking on fat people. Not cool. And if I read this correctly, you wife was "disappointed" that she was on bed rest. DISAPPOINTED! I suspect she was a little more than disappointed. Holy crap....have you ever been confined to a bed?
February 16, 2013 2:45 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Hold up. Now women can't be overweight especially when carrying an unborn child, nag too much AND are gold diggers. Anything else you would like to add?
So I can't generalize, but it's fine if you do?

QUOTE:
You want some qualifications?
Bachelor of psychology, honour in arts major feminist studies
Seven years working with a woman's health centre in domestic violence prevention
Three years in child protection
I gonna take a stab at the dark here and say that males are the main perps you're against here. Makes sense now.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition




When did I generalise?
I work with female perps too but yes the majority are male perps. I get my referrals from police reports, aka facts. So what exactly makes sense you now? That I perhaps am a strong woman who won't put up with sexism and stands up for women as a feminist? Or are you about to label me as a 'man basher'? Since this thread started I have discussed it with my (male) partner who also sees you as being judgemental and harsh towards pregnant women.
I'm always up for a decent debate. You sound more like you want to put on some gloves and hit the ring a few rounds though.
As for generalization, I started the thread with the women I observed (you preceive judged) while I was waiting. I've NEVER said all post mothers are too overweight. I made a statement about my DW nagging me, NOT that all wives nag. And lastly I made a statement about a rich obese guy and females who'll go for the money. NOT that all women are gold diggers.

It may be time for me to back out of this thread now because discussion ISN'T about how pass on more information on having safer and better pregnancies (which was the intent), but a bash fest by some who just want to vent anger.

Sincerely wish everyone luck on their journeys to whatever weight loss goal or fitness goal you're striving for.

A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
Edited by ninerbuff On February 16, 2013 2:45 PM
  9285851
February 16, 2013 2:47 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I don't understand why everyone is so riled about someone making a post on this topic. Society has a vested interest in babies being born healthy, and in their mothers being healthy. Many here seem to be taking this really personally. Maybe it's not necessarily OP's business when it comes to individual pregnant women, sure, but really half the forum posts people start here are about things that aren't their business, like what other people are doing at the gym, etc.

Personally I always looked at pregnancy as a time to be extra careful to eat only the most healthy food because I wanted to give my kids the best, healthiest start in life. I didn't touch fast food or added sugar for the whole 9 months. I was able to be back working out 2 days after coming home from the hospital and ran a half marathon 2 months later. It's certainly not for everyone but it's the way I prefer to do it.


Because even though a woman can do that, eat like that, she can still gain more weight. It really isn't anyone else's business. Oh, and btw, I could do that with my first 2 as well. Bully for you. Doesn't mean anything though. Not all pregnancies are the same.

For example. I haven't really eaten any different for any of my pregnancies. I've never been one to crave sweets so that was never a worry, in fact, my cravings have always been things like salads and orange juice and the like, throw in tacos for good measure. Now, first pregnancy, gain of 18lbs, loss of 20 when she was born. Second, gain of 22lbs, lost it all when she was born. Third, difficult pregnancy with a lot of pain issues which actually resulted in emergency c-section, gain of 40lbs (which I could never figure out how I was gaining that much), lost none when he was born. Fourth, also complications (started as twins, uterine tear, lost one, bedrest and so on) gain of about 25 to 30, again no loss when born. I just ballooned up. It wasn't that I wasn't trying to take care of myself or eat healthy, but the particular pregnancies were just hard on my body. Age also has a lot to do with it. I was much younger with my first two as well.

When someone comes along and makes judgments about how much women gain during pregnancy when they really have no clue the variety of issues each and every woman could be facing, it's just rude. To make this original claim based off a room of pregnant women the OP knows nothing about...I mean...come on.


I disagree that an extra fast recovery from delivery means nothing. I mean yes, recovery times can vary and there are plenty of other factors, but if you maintain a healthier lifestyle you are more likely to have a better recovery. Of course there are exceptions and special cases. All we can do is our best.

I agree that OP knew nothing about the women in that room but it didn't sound like he was judging them individually as much as he wanted to express concern about the growing trend of overweight moms to be in our country. Pregnancy weight gain has certainly risen over the years and it's not as good for the moms or the babies. Maybe he did mean it in a judgy way and I interpreted it wrong. But that's not how it came across to me. As I said I agree that it's no one's business on an individual level but it is a societal trend to be concerned about. And people have been saying things like "everyone knows you're not supposed to have a free for all with your diet while pregnant" but some people really don't know. I've met plenty.


So why, if this all was intended to bring awareness on a societal level, are we just talking about pregnant women? It's not your question to answer because you did not create the thread but think about it. I guess one would look really callous if they picked on children but more than anything, that's where America's obesity problem starts. In the home, as kids. OP might as well have started there.
  19593344
February 16, 2013 3:17 PM
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I don't understand why everyone is so riled about someone making a post on this topic. Society has a vested interest in babies being born healthy, and in their mothers being healthy. Many here seem to be taking this really personally. Maybe it's not necessarily OP's business when it comes to individual pregnant women, sure, but really half the forum posts people start here are about things that aren't their business, like what other people are doing at the gym, etc.

Personally I always looked at pregnancy as a time to be extra careful to eat only the most healthy food because I wanted to give my kids the best, healthiest start in life. I didn't touch fast food or added sugar for the whole 9 months. I was able to be back working out 2 days after coming home from the hospital and ran a half marathon 2 months later. It's certainly not for everyone but it's the way I prefer to do it.


Because even though a woman can do that, eat like that, she can still gain more weight. It really isn't anyone else's business. Oh, and btw, I could do that with my first 2 as well. Bully for you. Doesn't mean anything though. Not all pregnancies are the same.

For example. I haven't really eaten any different for any of my pregnancies. I've never been one to crave sweets so that was never a worry, in fact, my cravings have always been things like salads and orange juice and the like, throw in tacos for good measure. Now, first pregnancy, gain of 18lbs, loss of 20 when she was born. Second, gain of 22lbs, lost it all when she was born. Third, difficult pregnancy with a lot of pain issues which actually resulted in emergency c-section, gain of 40lbs (which I could never figure out how I was gaining that much), lost none when he was born. Fourth, also complications (started as twins, uterine tear, lost one, bedrest and so on) gain of about 25 to 30, again no loss when born. I just ballooned up. It wasn't that I wasn't trying to take care of myself or eat healthy, but the particular pregnancies were just hard on my body. Age also has a lot to do with it. I was much younger with my first two as well.

When someone comes along and makes judgments about how much women gain during pregnancy when they really have no clue the variety of issues each and every woman could be facing, it's just rude. To make this original claim based off a room of pregnant women the OP knows nothing about...I mean...come on.


I disagree that an extra fast recovery from delivery means nothing. I mean yes, recovery times can vary and there are plenty of other factors, but if you maintain a healthier lifestyle you are more likely to have a better recovery. Of course there are exceptions and special cases. All we can do is our best.

I agree that OP knew nothing about the women in that room but it didn't sound like he was judging them individually as much as he wanted to express concern about the growing trend of overweight moms to be in our country. Pregnancy weight gain has certainly risen over the years and it's not as good for the moms or the babies. Maybe he did mean it in a judgy way and I interpreted it wrong. But that's not how it came across to me. As I said I agree that it's no one's business on an individual level but it is a societal trend to be concerned about. And people have been saying things like "everyone knows you're not supposed to have a free for all with your diet while pregnant" but some people really don't know. I've met plenty.


So why, if this all was intended to bring awareness on a societal level, are we just talking about pregnant women? It's not your question to answer because you did not create the thread but think about it. I guess one would look really callous if they picked on children but more than anything, that's where America's obesity problem starts. In the home, as kids. OP might as well have started there.


I agree with you both that the problem starts as children and that one would never want to approach the problem by "picking on" anyone especially children.

In my opinion the way the child is nourished even before they are born could possibly have some effect on their well being when they are born. But more than that, children learn from the example of their parents. And in the majority of cases, the primary caregiver is the mother. So yes, it's important for mom to take care of herself. I have no idea in what spirit OP meant the original topic since as you said, I did not create it, but I wish the topic of weight gain and nutrition while pregnant could be discussed without people getting defensive or angry because I do believe it is an important one. Most of us know that it's so much easier to maintain weight than to lose it once it is gained, and since pregnancy is one of the most common times to gain excess weight, it makes sense to try to determine how our society can help expectant moms take better care of themselves.
February 16, 2013 3:57 PM
Yes, I read the entire thread. OP, you should just accept that there are somethings which you, as a male, should never EVER comment on, especially not online. The weight gain of the pregnant female is one of those things. Good heavens, I'm glad I'm not your wife!

Just for your information, I was (and am) solidly in the morbidly obese category. That'd be why I'm here. I was 222 pounds exactly the day I found out I was pregnant, and I was only about a month gone, so it's a fairly accurate pre-preg weight. I lost TWENTY POUNDS in the first trimester because I was so horribly sick. I lived on ensure, sprite, and mcdonalds french fries because barring the occasional random craving, that was literally ALL that would stay down. I lost so much so fast that my doctor actually asked me if I was trying to kill my baby, and it took the whole damn pregnancy to get it back. I walked into triage exactly four pounds over my pre-pregnancy weight. Because I had such a terrible time, my 21" long son weighed 6 pounds 11 ounces and was all skin and bones. He frightened me, he was so skinny, and he was a week and a half past due. He was four months old before he started to fill out.

Due to difficulties with the milk supply, I was on Domperidone for a few weeks to boost my supply. Nobody warned me about the weight gain. Everything I had lost at that point, I gained, and then some. I got up to 240. I'm down to 225 as of today. And I shudder to think what snarky thing would cross your mind if you saw me at the doctor's office, OP.

Just face it, there is no way you can say what you've said here and not sound judgmental... because like it or not you ARE judging us. Don't be shocked when we won't sit down and take it like good little girls.
  36862181
February 17, 2013 7:54 AM
I don't know how they do it. My pregnancies crowded my stomach so much that I could barely eat during the last two months and started losing weight. I gained maybe 28 pounds each pregnancy.

I wish my stomach had stayed crowded!

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