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TOPIC: Treadmill Incline - Figuring %s

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February 11, 2013 6:46 AM
Hi everyone! I just started a treadmill workout that uses incline ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 for much of the run. What percent is that when looking at calorie counters such as this:
http://www.shapesense.com/fitness-exercise/calculators/running-calorie-burn-calculator.aspx

I estimated 3% but I more or less pulled that out of nowhere.
Edited by nje444 On February 11, 2013 7:10 AM
February 11, 2013 6:49 AM
Don't be too keen to add incline on the treadmill .....It can really do a number on your knees, if you are not careful...I Know!
  17819046
February 11, 2013 7:07 AM
I don't eat exercise calories so it's a mute point for me but I'd just log it as an ordinary run and leave the incline as a bonus.
February 11, 2013 7:25 AM
Both excellent posts, but still would like some help with the calorie math
February 11, 2013 8:03 AM
I don't understand why one would use %. What's 100%? 360 degrees? 180 degrees? 90 degrees?

Degrees for incline make a lot more sense than %.
February 11, 2013 8:05 AM
I don't understand what the difference the percentage would make. Get a HRM that calculates your calorie burn and wear that when you run at an incline.
February 11, 2013 8:08 AM
heart rate monitor like jennieb wrote
February 11, 2013 8:09 AM
QUOTE:

Hi everyone! I just started a treadmill workout that uses incline ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 for much of the run. What percent is that when looking at calorie counters such as this:
http://www.shapesense.com/fitness-exercise/calculators/running-calorie-burn-calculator.aspx

I estimated 3% but I more or less pulled that out of nowhere.


Usually the 3.0 to 6.0 means 3% to 6%. When you're talking incline for a treadmill, it's usually listed in percentages.

A lot of treadmills will default to 1-1.5% incline to better simulate road-resistance. You can check yours with a level to see where it starts.
  1897001
February 11, 2013 8:15 AM
Ok so all of this said - What is the best heart rate monitor for active females
Ready
Set
Go!
explode
February 11, 2013 8:16 AM
By the way, if the workout really is listing degrees, then go here to convert:

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/slope-degrees-gradient-grade-d_1562.html

... but, running consistently at a 5-10% incline suuuuucks. :)
Edited by jasonheyd On February 11, 2013 8:17 AM
  1897001
February 11, 2013 8:18 AM
Running on a treadmill can suck in general :) We just got blasted with snow in the NE and I am training for a half so I cant get outside. I have come to face the fact that I will be staring at a wall for many miles over the next few weeks
February 11, 2013 8:20 AM
Normal use should be at .5%, that simulates being outside pretty accurately. Anything higher should only be used in context of a hill workout. As mentioned above it can be rough on your legs otherwise.

Better and more fun solution for a hill workout is to go find a good one outside and do repeats up and down. You'll feel that workout the next day!
February 11, 2013 8:22 AM
ha! I'm outside Boston, so I know what you mean. I actually do most of my running on a treadmill though... Easier on my knees. ;-)

For the HRM, check out Polar. I use the H7 (bluetooth) connected to my iPhone, but they have a lot of good options & some of them are pretty affordable.

Back to actually getting my lunch on my lunch break. Good luck with your half. :)
  1897001
February 11, 2013 8:24 AM
re: simulating the road on a treadmill, interesting read here:

http://www.hillrunner.com/jim2/id110.html

... now,really off to lunch.
  1897001
February 11, 2013 8:26 AM
QUOTE:

Running on a treadmill can suck in general :) We just got blasted with snow in the NE and I am training for a half so I cant get outside. I have come to face the fact that I will be staring at a wall for many miles over the next few weeks


Oh jeeze. Good luck with the training! (I'm in NE too and we got slammed with probably 36" of snow here)! When I was training for my first half quite a few years ago there were many times I had to do my long runs -- 8-10 miles! -- on a treadmill. Throw on some good music and try hard to zone out.

Oh, and for a HRM, I got a simple Timex one: Timex Zone Trainer Digital Heart Rate Monitor - Mid Size. It's completely no frills.
February 11, 2013 8:31 AM
QUOTE:

Ok so all of this said - What is the best heart rate monitor for active females
Ready
Set
Go!
explode



polar FT4... i did a lot of research before purchasing and this was best rated (and affordable) for women.
February 11, 2013 8:43 AM
Incline is much harder than running flats... I tend to burn twice as much on a hill than on a flat... I have a gps/calorie tracker though which gives me the precise numbers.
  31059850
February 11, 2013 8:48 AM
Excellent! Thank you so much for the tip Kimberly - it got good reviews on Amazon and its a good price. Some HRMS are out of control with costs.
February 11, 2013 9:36 AM
Back to the original question - 3.0 to 6.0 percent - is feet of rise (vertical) per 100 feet of run (horizontal). + 3.0 percent is climbing 3 feet for every 100 feet you move forward. The incline is useful if you can't jog/run fast, yet want to increase the heart rate by "walking up-hill." Incline also works the quadraceps (front of thighs).
February 11, 2013 9:53 AM
I did find that when training for my first half, that the treadmill inclines do not mimic the inclines noted on geographical course maps. My first half was in San Francisco, so I did a decent amount of hill training for it. And I checked that course map practically weekly to get the inclines and the percentages from the geographical mapping they had available. So I always ran my hill training on the treadmill at inclines set higher than the highest percentage on the course.

Well, the very first hill I ran up was almost steeper than anything the treadmill had been while training, and I'd had that thing up to 9 and 10 at times. I still managed to run the entire course, but I was so very grateful for the downhills the were my reward for making it up those hills.

So I'm not sure if the percentage that a treadmill uses is the same as the actual definition of percentage for a real hill slope.

Oh, and I use a Polar FT4 and love it.
Edited by wolfchild59 On February 11, 2013 9:54 AM
February 11, 2013 1:32 PM
QUOTE:

I did find that when training for my first half, that the treadmill inclines do not mimic the inclines noted on geographical course maps. My first half was in San Francisco, so I did a decent amount of hill training for it. And I checked that course map practically weekly to get the inclines and the percentages from the geographical mapping they had available. So I always ran my hill training on the treadmill at inclines set higher than the highest percentage on the course.

Well, the very first hill I ran up was almost steeper than anything the treadmill had been while training, and I'd had that thing up to 9 and 10 at times. I still managed to run the entire course, but I was so very grateful for the downhills the were my reward for making it up those hills.

So I'm not sure if the percentage that a treadmill uses is the same as the actual definition of percentage for a real hill slope.

Oh, and I use a Polar FT4 and love it.
February 11, 2013 1:32 PM
Just ordered in on Amazon! Thanks for the tip!
April 20, 2013 6:21 PM
QUOTE:

Incline is much harder than running flats... I tend to burn twice as much on a hill than on a flat... I have a gps/calorie tracker though which gives me the precise numbers.


I have reached the same conclusion based on my HRM which I wear during both incline runs and flat surface runs.

Aside from the calorie issue, I think different inclines are important during training as most race courses are not entirely flat.

Using only treadmills cannot properly train you because treadmills can only replicate running on flat or upward surfaces. Running downhill is also very important as it puts strain on different muscle groups.
  26529664
April 21, 2013 4:20 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Incline is much harder than running flats... I tend to burn twice as much on a hill than on a flat... I have a gps/calorie tracker though which gives me the precise numbers.


I have reached the same conclusion based on my HRM which I wear during both incline runs and flat surface runs.

Aside from the calorie issue, I think different inclines are important during training as most race courses are not entirely flat.

Using only treadmills cannot properly train you because treadmills can only replicate running on flat or upward surfaces. Running downhill is also very important as it puts strain on different muscle groups.



I totally agree... plus it doesn't replicate wind and rain which makes it even more difficult to run in during comps. My miles are my usually faster on a treadmill.
  31059850
April 21, 2013 6:01 AM
QUOTE:

Using only treadmills cannot properly train you because treadmills can only replicate running on flat or upward surfaces. Running downhill is also very important as it puts strain on different muscle groups.


Some treadmills do have decline settings as well, although most don't, I agree.

Treadmill, road, track, and trail are all different, but (for general exercise -- as opposed to race training) I look at it as any one of 'em will be better than none, and you can make up some of the shortfalls with appropriate non-run training.

Some of the effort re: flat vs. incline vs. decline has to do with pace as well. If I'm trying to maintain a particular heart rate zone when running outside, I just slow down a bit when I'm climbing a hill.

Maybe one of these days I'll hit the lottery and buy a top of the line race training treadmill to spare my candy-a__ some of the New England weather. ;-)
  1897001

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