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TOPIC: Can i eat anything as long as I stay under calorie goal?!?!

 
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February 1, 2013 5:03 PM
QUOTE:

Eating whatever you want as long as you stay under your "calorie goal" everyday is fine. But there is so much data out there that points to fast food as something that is detrimental to ones health. You could have a Big Mac once a week, sure.... but the "meat" that they use is not raised humanely, meaning the animal is subjected to terrible living conditions, which affects the animals immune system, causing the farm to pump the animal full of antibiotics and growth hormones to get it to the correct weight. These chemicals are being linked to long term health problems in humans. The more of those things you eat, the less healthy you really are. You may feel fine, but your cells are changing, they are mutating, they are causing you to either gain weight, or plaque in your arteries, or causing you cancer later on, giving you little health problems that you start to take prescriptions for, passing these little health problems onto your children.

Basically, the more processed your food is, the worse it will be for you in the long run. Learn how to cook foods at home, try to avoid fried foods and bake them instead, eat more veggies and fruits, especially veggies (but avoid corn, it hasn't gotten such good reviews lately).

Personally, I try. And sometimes I fail. I don't know the last time I ate fast food, the whole idea kind of freaks me out and luckily I found someone (my fiance) who feels the same. I enjoy donuts, and cake, and pizza, but I'm constantly trying to find substitutes for those things, either in whole wheat forms or making it at home so I know exactly what I'm putting in my body.

The nicer you are to your body and the environment that helps fuel your body, the better we will all be. I honestly believe that.smile
It's hard for me to believe all of that especially since I know that I've personally eating fast food consistently for over 40 years and haven't had the issues you stated above. You'd have to come up with some solid peer reviewed clinical study that supports it, or else it really just opinion.

A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness industry for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  9285851
February 1, 2013 10:18 PM
QUOTE:

My spelling sucks, sorry. I take courses in food, not learning to spell.


Fair enough - and dietitian is sometimes spelled this way - but the professional organizations have standardized on the other spelling. I was trying to be helpful. (Although attention to detail (like spelling) is very important in the medical field.)

QUOTE:
Yes it is being taught. Nice presumption though, thinking I would state that I am studying nutrition and not post anything I was taught. That makes no logical sense.


You must have misread. I did not make any presumptions. I asked you a question - which is kind of the opposite of making a presumption.

QUOTE:
Knowing what is in our food is part of nutrition. It will be my job to tell people what is good for their body and what is not. I'm sure it is your job to decide my curriculum though. :]


As a member of the public - I do have an interest in medical para-professionals being taught facts - as do you. Ethically, it will be your job to tell people what science (through peer-reviewed studies) says is good for their body - not your opinions or preferences.

I'm not trying to sell you on margarine - I don't eat it either (personal preference). And the trans-fat issue was, as I understand, a real issue backed by science - one which, also as I understand has been mostly addressed by reformulating the products at this point. But teachers trying to scare people off it with nonsense like "It's one molecule different from plastic" is, at best, silly. Which was my whole point about the margarine. (It's like saying, "Don't drink Goldschläger because gold is only a few protons different than lead".)

And honestly, I would not have bothered with any of this if it had not seemed like you were trying to set yourself up as an authority on these topics ("I am studying to become a Registered Dietician now, so I am not giving advice with no background").

Ultimately, since you desire to be a Registered Dietitian, whatever food opinions you have (anti-GMO, anti-artificial sweeteners, dangerous unnamed food additives, unhealthy unnamed food processing, etc) - you should track down some peer reviewed research and make sure that you are passing on facts and not unsupported opinions (or at least hedge your commentary like the doctor in your quote did with "may").

And IMO, you should really expect this level of ethical and professional behavior from your teachers too. I think it kind of sucks that you are being taught opinions.

As a student - you are not yet bound by the code of ethics that RD's adhere to (in the US) - but here's a link (pdf):
http://www.eatright.org/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=7994

But anyway... I wish you the best in your studies!
February 1, 2013 10:34 PM
This has been very interesting reading.
Edited by zumbaforever On February 1, 2013 10:38 PM
  36396399
February 1, 2013 11:23 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

My spelling sucks, sorry. I take courses in food, not learning to spell.


Fair enough - and dietitian is sometimes spelled this way - but the professional organizations have standardized on the other spelling. I was trying to be helpful. (Although attention to detail (like spelling) is very important in the medical field.)

QUOTE:
Yes it is being taught. Nice presumption though, thinking I would state that I am studying nutrition and not post anything I was taught. That makes no logical sense.


You must have misread. I did not make any presumptions. I asked you a question - which is kind of the opposite of making a presumption.

QUOTE:
Knowing what is in our food is part of nutrition. It will be my job to tell people what is good for their body and what is not. I'm sure it is your job to decide my curriculum though. :]


As a member of the public - I do have an interest in medical para-professionals being taught facts - as do you. Ethically, it will be your job to tell people what science (through peer-reviewed studies) says is good for their body - not your opinions or preferences.

I'm not trying to sell you on margarine - I don't eat it either (personal preference). And the trans-fat issue was, as I understand, a real issue backed by science - one which, also as I understand has been mostly addressed by reformulating the products at this point. But teachers trying to scare people off it with nonsense like "It's one molecule different from plastic" is, at best, silly. Which was my whole point about the margarine. (It's like saying, "Don't drink Goldschläger because gold is only a few protons different than lead".)

And honestly, I would not have bothered with any of this if it had not seemed like you were trying to set yourself up as an authority on these topics ("I am studying to become a Registered Dietician now, so I am not giving advice with no background").

Ultimately, since you desire to be a Registered Dietitian, whatever food opinions you have (anti-GMO, anti-artificial sweeteners, dangerous unnamed food additives, unhealthy unnamed food processing, etc) - you should track down some peer reviewed research and make sure that you are passing on facts and not unsupported opinions (or at least hedge your commentary like the doctor in your quote did with "may").

And IMO, you should really expect this level of ethical and professional behavior from your teachers too. I think it kind of sucks that you are being taught opinions.

As a student - you are not yet bound by the code of ethics that RD's adhere to (in the US) - but here's a link (pdf):
http://www.eatright.org/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=7994

But anyway... I wish you the best in your studies!


@JUDDDing, I love you like I love ninerbuff, so glad you actually came back to this thread as I was wondering if you would take the time to respond, and am thankful that you did. I totally agree with you, after reading his/her reply to you, I give you kudos for not mirroring this person's rudeness and snarky remarks. Way to keep it classy. flowerforyou
  7664754
February 1, 2013 11:30 PM
NO.
  35147246
February 1, 2013 11:49 PM
Can i eat anything as long as I stay under calorie goal?!?!

That depends on what your goal is.
Lose weight.... build muscle..... take in nutrients..... feed cravings..... or create new ones.....

All these personal opinions illustrate the variety of goals people of MFP have.

Interesting eh?
  1210291
February 1, 2013 11:51 PM
If you want to lose weight, then yes.

If you want to be healthy, then not on a regular basis.
February 2, 2013 12:00 AM
I think you'll find that the more you get into your journey, the less you will crave McDonalds and food that has little nutritional value...I'm only doing 1200 calories a day, and I eat all day...it is fruit and vegetables, but I also eat a lot of tuna and chicken. I do have blow outs, but I feel 'fat' when i have, I've found that eating small amounts often is easier...
good luck with your journey
  27357495
February 2, 2013 12:00 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Eating whatever you want as long as you stay under your "calorie goal" everyday is fine. But there is so much data out there that points to fast food as something that is detrimental to ones health. You could have a Big Mac once a week, sure.... but the "meat" that they use is not raised humanely, meaning the animal is subjected to terrible living conditions, which affects the animals immune system, causing the farm to pump the animal full of antibiotics and growth hormones to get it to the correct weight. These chemicals are being linked to long term health problems in humans. The more of those things you eat, the less healthy you really are. You may feel fine, but your cells are changing, they are mutating, they are causing you to either gain weight, or plaque in your arteries, or causing you cancer later on, giving you little health problems that you start to take prescriptions for, passing these little health problems onto your children.

Basically, the more processed your food is, the worse it will be for you in the long run. Learn how to cook foods at home, try to avoid fried foods and bake them instead, eat more veggies and fruits, especially veggies (but avoid corn, it hasn't gotten such good reviews lately).

Personally, I try. And sometimes I fail. I don't know the last time I ate fast food, the whole idea kind of freaks me out and luckily I found someone (my fiance) who feels the same. I enjoy donuts, and cake, and pizza, but I'm constantly trying to find substitutes for those things, either in whole wheat forms or making it at home so I know exactly what I'm putting in my body.

The nicer you are to your body and the environment that helps fuel your body, the better we will all be. I honestly believe that.smile


There is not a shred of data that supports this. Not a single study. Provide a link


The link is in my pants
  32721919
February 2, 2013 12:02 AM
^ lol!

I don't see a problem with occasional McFood, EXCEPT that in my experience it sets me off on whole trends - days, weeks - of eating crap. Moderation is easier when you use foods that make getting to macros easier. (In theory. Personally I've been having a hard time no matter what lately.)
Edited by upgetupgetup On February 2, 2013 12:14 AM
February 2, 2013 12:03 AM
omg....I just answered her simple question, and have read some of the crap that you lot have posted...it isn't a competition on who has the best quals...it was a simple question, get over yourselves
  27357495
February 2, 2013 12:09 AM
Personally I would not.

I could eat 2000 calories of fresh food and be absolutely stuffed to the brim and completely satisfied, not hungry at ALL, I suspect if I ate a big mac and 5 cookies I would be hungry an hour later and on my way to a binge of similar foods.

I have in the past lived off wine and chocolate for periods of time, but I can't say it did me any favours and didn't reward me with a rocking bod either.

If you like McDonalds and can't live without it, work it into your weekly plan perhaps once. Save the rest of the money that you usually spend on takeaway and then use that money to buy a new pair of shoes (or something) when you get to your goal weight. This way, you will see other benefits and can wear your success in more than one way.

Good luck!
  32266644
February 2, 2013 12:21 AM
QUOTE:

plus i don't think he's going to eat nothing but mcdonalds every day. i mean, there's got to be a taco bell around his house to mix that $hit up sometimes.

laugh
  16386313
February 2, 2013 4:38 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Eating whatever you want as long as you stay under your "calorie goal" everyday is fine. But there is so much data out there that points to fast food as something that is detrimental to ones health. You could have a Big Mac once a week, sure.... but the "meat" that they use is not raised humanely, meaning the animal is subjected to terrible living conditions, which affects the animals immune system, causing the farm to pump the animal full of antibiotics and growth hormones to get it to the correct weight. These chemicals are being linked to long term health problems in humans. The more of those things you eat, the less healthy you really are. You may feel fine, but your cells are changing, they are mutating, they are causing you to either gain weight, or plaque in your arteries, or causing you cancer later on, giving you little health problems that you start to take prescriptions for, passing these little health problems onto your children.

Basically, the more processed your food is, the worse it will be for you in the long run. Learn how to cook foods at home, try to avoid fried foods and bake them instead, eat more veggies and fruits, especially veggies (but avoid corn, it hasn't gotten such good reviews lately).

Personally, I try. And sometimes I fail. I don't know the last time I ate fast food, the whole idea kind of freaks me out and luckily I found someone (my fiance) who feels the same. I enjoy donuts, and cake, and pizza, but I'm constantly trying to find substitutes for those things, either in whole wheat forms or making it at home so I know exactly what I'm putting in my body.

The nicer you are to your body and the environment that helps fuel your body, the better we will all be. I honestly believe that.smile


There is not a shred of data that supports this. Not a single study. Provide a link


The link is in my pants


Could you pm me the link so I can check it out later?
February 2, 2013 5:25 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Technically yes, you can, but you're not going to be very healthy doing so.
Not true. I eat McDonald's at least once a week and KNOW I'm healthier than a lot of vegans, paleo, clean eaters etc. who are overweight.
Health isn't just about food. Health is encompassed by weight, essential nutrition, exercise, rest, genetics, environment, disease resistance and happiness. Delete any one of those and you can compromise your health.

A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness industry for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition


While I agree with your comment. I believe she is talking about you micro nutrient intake from those types of foods.
Maybe. But most people on here believe that eating any fast food is nothing but a detriment to weight loss.

A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness industry for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition



McDonalds goes straight to my boobs. And I don't need anymore of those! drinker

I wish this happened to me.
It just goes straight to my thighs.
  34787726
February 4, 2013 3:53 AM
It truly amazes me that anyone would suggest fast food is ok in a healthy eating context

I find it slightly depressing
February 4, 2013 3:56 AM
let's put it this way: you CAN eat whatever u want with your cals, but you might make it HARDER on yourself by doing so:

you will have less cals left for the rest of the day after a big cal item...this could leave you hungry, lead to a binge or to feelings of deprivation

many junk foods also trigger cravings in many people. me, for instance. so taking those in may also make it harder to stop eating them, meaning you go over cals eventually.

plus nutritionally, in terms of vitamins, minerals, cholesterol, etc...those foods are bad for us. we know this. our organs know this.

thin does not always mean healthy.
  25521246
February 4, 2013 4:24 AM
I haven't read all the other replies so sorry if I have repeated anything.

I am taking green tea on a morning and zinc on an evening and logging all my exercise and diets and I am losing weight!!!

I am still eating chocolate and crisps - just trying to reduce as I think I am addicted.....

Good luck x x
February 4, 2013 4:35 AM
Without reading other's responses I must say that I have struggled with this myself. I started myfitnesspal religiously in August and lost 30 pounds but after that I was at a stand still. I was eating the suggested amount of calories but the scale wasnt budging. I was all too confused on what I was doing wrong. I made an appt with my doctor and he told me that it isnt how many calories your eating it is what you are eating that is making you not lose anymore weight. I thought that just because I stayed under my calorie goal I could eat pizza and potato chips when ever I wanted as long as I log it in my diary. Well that is definately not the story. I honestly believe that it works for a while until your body id used to how many calories you are eating, then you need to step up your game and take a serious look at things. More fruits and veggies, less carbs, more protein. It is more than just calories...

Hope this helps!
February 4, 2013 4:54 AM
QUOTE:

It truly amazes me that anyone would suggest fast food is ok in a healthy eating context

I find it slightly depressing


Man, your mental state must be on a knife-edge, you wanna take a chill pill and chow down on a pizza occasionally.

Of course 'fast food' is OK ... Not all the time but there is no need to turn into some grass fed organic macrobiotic freak in order to be healthy.

Add a bit of perspective and balance and most indulgences can be factored in.

"Fast food" is great ... It's food, it's fast and it's ridiculously tasty. Enjoy and forget the rulebook once in a while, It's not all about having a pristine nutritional plan.

But depress away if thou must ;)
  17124298
February 4, 2013 5:43 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

It truly amazes me that anyone would suggest fast food is ok in a healthy eating context

I find it slightly depressing


Man, your mental state must be on a knife-edge, you wanna take a chill pill and chow down on a pizza occasionally.

Of course 'fast food' is OK ... Not all the time but there is no need to turn into some grass fed organic macrobiotic freak in order to be healthy.

Add a bit of perspective and balance and most indulgences can be factored in.

"Fast food" is great ... It's food, it's fast and it's ridiculously tasty. Enjoy and forget the rulebook once in a while, It's not all about having a pristine nutritional plan.

But depress away if thou must ;)


It truly amazes me that anyone would suggest fast food is ok in a healthy eating context

I find it slightly depressing
February 4, 2013 5:53 AM
I say its all good in moderation. Iv not had a mcdonalds for about 6 months. I might have a tiny slither of pizza when the kids/other half have one but I wont eat a whole one or eat a huge burger every day. If we go on a day out at the weekend I might go to the burger van and get a cheese burger. Im good the rest of the time (lots of cous cous, meats, veg, soups) so once in a while is ok. If you daily diet is mcds for breakfast, pizza for lunch and fried chicken for dinner then thats bad obviously. Like I said, once in a while is fine.
February 4, 2013 6:23 AM
I had fish & chips on Saturday - it's high in oil and calories but it's natural food with only the batter flour and the oil being processed in any way, and everyone surely needs a treat at least once a week. Anyway, I'd done a 1000 calorie cardio burn in the gym earlier to pay for it! McDonalds etc? Crap - apart from the fries and the tiny amount of salad it's all highly processed and not good for anyone even in small doses. How about a home-made burger with good steak mince and a good bun from a local baker with plenty of salad?
Edited by ElectricPics On February 4, 2013 6:29 AM
  33334981
February 4, 2013 6:35 AM
QUOTE:

Thanks for the replies guys! I absolutely love fast food so I know how hard it will be to just say no every time i smell McDonalds whenever I drive by. But I have been smarter lately and can attest to the fact that a single packet of cinnamon swirl quaker instant oatmeal in the morning kept me fulll for like 4 hours while a sausage egg and cheese mcmuffin with hash bown lasted aout a half hour lollaugh . I'm definitely growing more keen to making better meal choices. Btw I'm a little new even though my account is old so feel free to add me for support! I can definitely use it! Abs by summer '13!!!!


Short answer to your question: Yes.

Don't cut out anything that you couldn't give up forever. This is a lifestyle change, not a diet.

I started out like you and was a junk food fiend, and now more often than not I can't justify the amount of calories that are in one measly meal. I don't eat 'clean' by any means, but I eat a lot less takeaways.

In time as you learn more about food, you will probably be quite willing to give up a tiny cheeseburger over the heaving mound of fresh, home made food you could eat in place of it for the same calories.
  2276902
February 4, 2013 6:39 AM
Yep, eat whatever you like apart from the YELLOW SNOX, never eat the yellow snow

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