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TOPIC: Burning more Calories than taking in

 
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January 28, 2013 10:18 AM
Hi all,

So I am hoping someone can shed some light on my situation and tell me if this is good or bad, . I've lost 17 lbs so far (281 to 263lbs 5'11 Male). Im currently burning more calories than I'm taking in. Not trying to starve myself but am just not hungry due to my body getting used to its current diet. Im allocated 1910 cals a day and am taking in on average from 1000 - 1400 cals a day but with exercise I net around from 500-900 cals a day. Do I absolutely need to eat the 1910 that the app requires? In the beginning the weight came off super fast but now seems to have slowed down. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance!.
January 28, 2013 10:25 AM
Peanut butter is around 100 calories a tbsp. For every 100 calories under your goal your total ends up being, eat a tbsp of peanut butter. Problem solved.
Edited by justsomerandomgirl On January 28, 2013 10:25 AM
January 28, 2013 10:31 AM
Thanks so much. But is it bad that I wasn't eating the required calories a day? And if so why is that. Im a newbie to this healthy lifestyle.
January 28, 2013 10:34 AM
Creating too big of a deficit will slow or stall your weight loss.. you maybe able to get away with it for awhile.. but eventually you will have a nice plateau on your hands.. add a portion of whatever your main item is to each meal and you should be able to make up the calories
January 28, 2013 10:36 AM
yes it is bad. If you really average 500-900 net calories per day, your body is going to start shutting down non-essential processes to conserve energy. What this means is you are going to feel like crap and your metabolism is going to slow.

If you want to do this long term, then net your 1910 calorie allowance. You will feel better and you will lose weight quicker in the long run. Not to mention, you will quit/minimize losing lean muscle mass (which I guarantee that you are losing a LOT right now), so you will look better once you lose the fat.
  11058666
January 28, 2013 10:42 AM
QUOTE:

yes it is bad. If you really average 500-900 net calories per day, your body is going to start shutting down non-essential processes to conserve energy. What this means is you are going to feel like crap and your metabolism is going to slow.

If you want to do this long term, then net your 1910 calorie allowance. You will feel better and you will lose weight quicker in the long run. Not to mention, you will quit/minimize losing lean muscle mass (which I guarantee that you are losing a LOT right now), so you will look better once you lose the fat.


Thanks for the input! I usually don't feel hungry and if I did snack on something even if it was healthy it felt like cheating. I drink a ton of water when I would be hungry after dinner and or lunch and would feel full but I will start to add more to my caloric intake. Thanks again.
January 28, 2013 10:46 AM
The reason you don't feel hungry is because your metabolism has already slowed itself down. Definitely up the calories...you may be to do it a couple hundred calories per week until you hit the 1,900. It is not uncommon to gain a few pounds in this process as it takes some time for your metabolism to kick back in...once it does, you will start losing again.
January 28, 2013 10:50 AM
Leptin, your satiety hormone, can get really messed up after chronic calorie restriction. Thus, one day you will feel full on such low calories but the next day you'll be starving. Also, the mantra "burn more than you take in" gets distorted a lot. It isn't stating you must burn more calories in exercise than what you eat. Rather, it's supply your body with less energy than your TDEE.
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