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TOPIC: LIFTING WEIGHTS, EATING RIGHT, BUT STILL GAINED WEIGHT

 
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January 11, 2013 6:44 AM
My wife and I are getting back into the swing of things here on MFP. My job keeps me very busy so its hard to keep everything tracked and put as much time in as i would like. My wife has been much better about tracking her food and staying active.

We have been lifting weights in the gym close to us, 1 push day, 1 pull day, and 1 leg day each week. we are both lifting as heavy as we can, roughtly 3 sets of 6 for everything.

We are still gaining weight. Could this be due to the style of workout we are doing? should we change things up to lighter wieghts and more reps?
January 11, 2013 6:50 AM
Heavy lifting can stall weight loss, due to water retention. When I lift heavy while on a cut, I will be lucky to lose 2 pounds every 4 to 6 weeks. BUT.......heavy lifting is great for body composition changes. Meaning trading bodyfat for lean body mass and hopefully a little muscle as well.
So you should be measuring to judge progress instead of just using the scale. In fact, forget the scale while heavy lifting. If you want to see weight loss, you could always take a break from lifting for a couple weeks.
One last thing. You mentioned that is hard to keep everything tracked. Unless you are one of those people who are experienced enough to KNOW how much to eat, track everything. Even when it is a pain in the ass, make time. You have to be consistent and learn your body. It is very easy to go over on calories without even realizing it when you don't track.
  28886255
January 11, 2013 6:53 AM
QUOTE:

My wife and I are getting back into the swing of things here on MFP. My job keeps me very busy so its hard to keep everything tracked and put as much time in as i would like. My wife has been much better about tracking her food and staying active.

We have been lifting weights in the gym close to us, 1 push day, 1 pull day, and 1 leg day each week. we are both lifting as heavy as we can, roughtly 3 sets of 6 for everything.

We are still gaining weight. Could this be due to the style of workout we are doing? should we change things up to lighter wieghts and more reps?


Eating "right" is great, but if you want to lose weight you have to eat less.
January 11, 2013 6:56 AM
How much have you gained over what period?
  18358448
January 11, 2013 6:56 AM
Weight loss is a function of having a calorie deficit. Not being able to see your food diary it is sort of difficult to comment, but the common problems are:

1) Eating too many calories because you are not measuring carefully. This is very common. Getting into the habit of using a kitchen scale and measuring spoons and cups for everything is vital.

2) Water weight. If you are just starting an intense workout program your muscles will retain water to help them recover. This will eventually pass, but can cause weight gain.

3) Only using the scale to measure progress. The ultimate goal is to lose fat. The scale does not show that. It only shows weight. Realize the only person who knows your weight is you, unless you past it on your forehead. What people see is how your body shape changes. So measure yourself (chest, waist, hips at the very least).
  3004823
January 11, 2013 6:59 AM
I don't tend to try to lose weight when trying to gain muscle. I'm gaining now, just a couple pounds here and there but the tape measure is making me happy.

Ignore the scale if the clothes are looser and the tape measure shows improvement.

What does the mirror say? It's the most honest thing in my house, besides the camera taking a full-body shot.

[Edited for typographical error]
Edited by BeachGingerOnTheRocks On January 11, 2013 7:00 AM
January 11, 2013 7:02 AM
If you use a scale while lifting, use one that tells you your body fat %

Muscle can make your weight misleading, but body fat % doesn't lie. Additionally, start tracking with measuring tape!
  13870109
January 11, 2013 7:04 AM
QUOTE:

If you use a scale while lifting, use one that tells you your body fat %

Muscle can make your weight misleading, but body fat % doesn't lie. Additionally, start tracking with measuring tape!


Unfortunately the body fat scales do lie - they are incredibly inaccurate.
  18358448
January 11, 2013 7:08 AM
Are you using a scale to measure your food? I wanted to check your diary and see what your daily goal is/what you're burning but it's closed. Are you sure you're eating enough food for the amount you're lifting/working out? It takes time
  25692978
January 11, 2013 7:09 AM
supposed to be gaining weight.

take y'all's measurements!
  5133274
January 11, 2013 7:23 AM
I "THOUGHT" I was having the same issue, but it went down quickly after about a week. Your body is "shocked" right now, so dont get discouraged, it will come off! Keep doing what you're doing....TRUST!! Nutrition is highly important though!
January 11, 2013 10:32 AM
Thank you all for the insight. I really do appreciate it.

I talking some of my Marines today about this subject as well. the general thought is that i might be losing fat, but not faster than my body is building muscle(probably true for my wife as well seeing as i push her as hard as i push myself). So this is why we continue to gain the weight.

I will look in to bringing some cardio into the mix and moving my rep range from the 5-6 side of things to the 12-15.

once again, thanks.
January 11, 2013 10:50 AM
QUOTE:


I will look in to bringing some cardio into the mix and moving my rep range from the 5-6 side of things to the 12-15.

once again, thanks.


I would recommend against this. Stick with what you are doing for at least 4 weeks. Take measurements, and put the scale away. Then in 4 weeks weigh yourself and take measurements.

http://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/2011/07/21/meet-staci-your-new-powerlifting-super-hero/

It is not about weight, it is about body fat. Building muscle is very difficult in a calorie deficit. It is much more likely that this is happening

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/200544-why-do-you-sometimes-gain-weight-when-starting-a-new-exercis

Changing your program up now, unless it is a calorie issue with eating too many calories, would be counter productive.
  3004823
January 11, 2013 10:54 AM
Yep follow the Number 1 rule of Zombieland: Cardio
  33780555
January 11, 2013 11:00 AM
QUOTE:

Thank you all for the insight. I really do appreciate it.

I talking some of my Marines today about this subject as well. the general thought is that i might be losing fat, but not faster than my body is building muscle(probably true for my wife as well seeing as i push her as hard as i push myself). So this is why we continue to gain the weight.

I will look in to bringing some cardio into the mix and moving my rep range from the 5-6 side of things to the 12-15.

once again, thanks.


Unfortunately, your Marines are ill informed like many others. It' is virtually impossible to gain muscle while cutting fat. Both require two different types of eating (surplus vs deficit). Also, going from 5-6 reps to 12-15 will only prevent you from getting stronger. In terms of fat loss, they are equivalent. Higher reps is more muscular endurance while low reps increase strength. I prefer a program that mixes so you can maximize strength gains and improve endurance.
January 11, 2013 11:02 AM
From your profile pic, I'd say losing weight is likely not the best goal for you. Gaining muscle and eating healthy are great goals, so congrats. Your wife's goals could be different depending on her situation. Dedicating a lot of time to cardio for it's own sake doesn't really make sense for you then. Some is good for everyone, and some people like runners do it to train for their sport, but adding it to lose weight when you don't need to lose weight would be a waste of time.

Many people who are in good shape get their cardio just with fun activities, team sports etc. and spend their time in the gym on weights. Then again, some not so in shape folks look down their noses at those cardio people at the gym when they themselves would obviously benifit from some cardio before they worried about the circumfrence of their pecs or whatever.
Edited by alanlmarshall On January 11, 2013 11:08 AM
January 11, 2013 11:08 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Thank you all for the insight. I really do appreciate it.

I talking some of my Marines today about this subject as well. the general thought is that i might be losing fat, but not faster than my body is building muscle(probably true for my wife as well seeing as i push her as hard as i push myself). So this is why we continue to gain the weight.

I will look in to bringing some cardio into the mix and moving my rep range from the 5-6 side of things to the 12-15.

once again, thanks.


Unfortunately, your Marines are ill informed like many others. It' is virtually impossible to gain muscle while cutting fat. Both require two different types of eating (surplus vs deficit). Also, going from 5-6 reps to 12-15 will only prevent you from getting stronger. In terms of fat loss, they are equivalent. Higher reps is more muscular endurance while low reps increase strength. I prefer a program that mixes so you can maximize strength gains and improve endurance.


^^this

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/818594-building-muscle-and-losing-fat-at-the-same-time
  18358448
January 11, 2013 1:35 PM
QUOTE:

My wife and I are getting back into the swing of things here on MFP. My job keeps me very busy so its hard to keep everything tracked and put as much time in as i would like. My wife has been much better about tracking her food and staying active.

We have been lifting weights in the gym close to us, 1 push day, 1 pull day, and 1 leg day each week. we are both lifting as heavy as we can, roughtly 3 sets of 6 for everything.

We are still gaining weight. Could this be due to the style of workout we are doing? should we change things up to lighter wieghts and more reps?


Muscle weighs more the fat... So when you lift weights you are gaining weight in muscle (a great thing) but the scales do not reflect the muscle you too have added. I would not stop your training just continue to watch your portions at meals and the amount of Saturated fat in the meals... Last point: Lean muscle lowers your body fat (again great thing) a lower body fat means a healthier heart... Good luck on your training and achieving your goals.
  30871107
January 11, 2013 2:02 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

My wife and I are getting back into the swing of things here on MFP. My job keeps me very busy so its hard to keep everything tracked and put as much time in as i would like. My wife has been much better about tracking her food and staying active.

We have been lifting weights in the gym close to us, 1 push day, 1 pull day, and 1 leg day each week. we are both lifting as heavy as we can, roughtly 3 sets of 6 for everything.

We are still gaining weight. Could this be due to the style of workout we are doing? should we change things up to lighter wieghts and more reps?


Muscle weighs more the fat... So when you lift weights you are gaining weight in muscle (a great thing) but the scales do not reflect the muscle you too have added. I would not stop your training just continue to watch your portions at meals and the amount of Saturated fat in the meals... Last point: Lean muscle lowers your body fat (again great thing) a lower body fat means a healthier heart... Good luck on your training and achieving your goals.


Please see link above that explains that you generally do not gain muscle on a deficit.
  18358448

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