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TOPIC: Is my scale accurate?

 
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February 21, 2010 7:31 AM
I have a digital bathroom scale that I have had for a few years and I have been using it to track my weight loss. I recently got a new job at my gym and I decided to try the scale there. It is one of those scales that you use at the doctors office. When I weighed it said that I was about 13 pounds lighter than what my scale read. Does anyone know if digital bathroom scales or the doctor-type scales are more accurate? I just need to know for my BMI and calorie needs.
February 21, 2010 7:39 AM
I use to have a digital scale and I personally dont think they are very accurate... I could never get it to match any ot the other scales I would get on ... I worked at the hospital and their scales showed a different number so I invested in a different scale.. although I wouldnt go by the doctors scale either cause they too are always off.. So If I were you go buy a new scale and just use that one from now on!!!
February 21, 2010 7:40 AM
I would assume the doctors office scale is more accurate. You should find a third scale and see if it gives you the same reading.
  419069
February 21, 2010 7:48 AM
scales always seem to give different numbers. I would see if yours needs a new battery and continue to use your scale, it knows your weight loss best and is more convenent.
  264315
February 21, 2010 12:27 PM
The gym scale may not be balanced... It is VERY easy for gym scales to get off track with all of the people hopping on and off all the time. The thing is, your weight is just a number at the end of the day.. so I would pick a scale and stick with it.

Mentally, thats a BIG difference in weight, but don't let it affect you either way, because then you'll be focusing too much on the numbers and less on what it MEANS to lose weight. (ie. better health, fitness, clothes fitting, etc.) And besides, even if the other scale IS accurate, you didn't lose that weight overnight which means your weight-loss has still be steady and accurate.

Pick a scale is my best advice. smile
Edited by mlove1307 On February 21, 2010 12:27 PM
  501291
February 21, 2010 12:31 PM
i agree with mlove, pick a scale and use that. the most accurate is the one you use the most consistancy. :)
February 21, 2010 1:04 PM
All scales vary, but 13 pounds is a pretty big difference. I would suggest weighing yourself somewhere else if you can to get an idea of which is more accurate- the scales at the gym need to be calibrated regularly, so if they were recently calibrated, they'd probably be more accurate. If they haven't been, then they may be off.
  232091
February 21, 2010 1:12 PM
I will tell you at our school we have a doctor's office like scale and it is broken and the weight shows about 15 pounds less than what is right. Do you have a child you could weigh on your scale at home? They weigh so much less it is a little more obvious to see if it's wrong, ya know? I would change the batteries in your scale or buy a new digital one and check. Usually if my scale is weird I weigh my 2 year old who is 34 pounds because I know he doesn't gain or lose weight often and so if it shows him right around there I figure it is still okay. Not scientific by any means, lol.
February 21, 2010 4:21 PM
Well, its not really that I care about the number, I would just like to know so could know my true calorie needs, bmi, and to set my goals accordingly. I did put a 5 pound weight on the scale at the gym and it said exactly 5 lbs. Who knows. I've been losing pretty well with my current calorie goal. I'll just stick with what it's currently set at and deal with it when it becomes a problem.
Edited by saram21 On February 21, 2010 4:23 PM
February 21, 2010 4:24 PM
Whenever I get weighed at the doctor's, I'm ALWAYS heavier than I "really" am. Usually it's cause I go in for appointments later in the day after a full day of eating! I'd suggesting finding a scale that gives a measurement, and then only weigh yourself on that one scale.
  652532
February 21, 2010 4:42 PM
QUOTE:

Well, its not really that I care about the number, I would just like to know so could know my true calorie needs, bmi, and to set my goals accordingly.


13 pounds hardly makes any difference when it comes to calorie needs. BMI is also not an accurate indicator of anything, really. So, don't stress over it! I agree with the others -- just pick one of the scales and use it.

I have 2 scales -- an old dial scale & a newer digital scale. On my digital scale, I weigh 214. On my old dial scale, I weigh 198. when I first got my digital scale, I weighed 270 on it and 254 on my dial scale. Doesn't matter which one is right -- I've lost the same amount of weight on both. smile Long term goals are just kind of a best guess anyway.
  270768
June 14, 2012 12:18 PM
I believe in weighing yourself on the same scale to track progress. Have you considered placing a two pound weight and 1 or 2 lb box of something.
June 14, 2012 12:22 PM
Here is a couple articles from this website that state otherwise:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/184126-most-accurate-body-weight-scales/


Digital Floor Scales

Digital floor scales are probably the most accurate type of scale on the market, typically registering accuracies within 1 percent of a pound. Many brands offer affordable and trendy styles to fit in any atmosphere and range in price from $30 to a little over $100. Also, depending on the scale model, some come equipped with large number displays, voice activation, and body fat percentage capabilities. Most digital floor scales hold a maximum weight of about 330 lbs. and offer the option to read in kilograms.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/184126-most-accurate-body-weight-scales/#ixzz1xnU6DugG


Digital Physician Fitness Scales

The digital physician fitness scale is another very reliable scale for measuring body weight. Increasingly more health professionals are transitioning from the balance beam physician scale to the digital version. Although, the price tag for this type of scale can be costly--$350 to over $1,000 in 2010--the benefits of accurate readings and durability can offset the price. Additionally, the LCD display is available for a pole mount at eye level or waist level; some models offer display remotes for easy portability. Digital physician fitness scales can hold up to a maximum weight of 600 lbs. and provide the option to read in kilograms.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/184126-most-accurate-body-weight-scales/#ixzz1xnUGf7uw


Balance Beam Physician Scales

Balance beam physician scales are commonly used in doctor's offices and fitness centers. This scale provides consistent and accurate readings every time. Most balance beam scales are at eye level and allow the user to easily read their measurement. In addition, the balance beam physician scale can measure the height of the individual with the use of a built-in height rod. The maximum weight capacity for this scale can range from 350 to 500 lbs., and most are also scaled in kilograms. Although the physician scales are bulky and require recalibrating periodically in order for readings to remain accurate, the initial investment is worth the expense due to its longevity. The average price range for a balance beam physician scale can be anywhere from $160 to over $400 as of 2010.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/184126-most-accurate-body-weight-scales/#ixzz1xnULPdpn
  24017416
June 14, 2012 12:30 PM
Dr's scales are way off. Some Dr's appointments and weigh in's on their scales have shown me to weigh more than what my scale shows, or it has shown less than what my scale shows. Some scales have been the old school metal kind, the other is the step on digital with the reader on the wall. I trust my scale (digital), I always weigh in and track my numbers from that scale only. It has been very consistent since I bought it, maybe a year/half ago. Also I periodically test it by stepping on, seeing the number, stepping on again holding a 10lbs weight, checking the number. I just did it recently again, -exactly- 10lbs heavier to the 'T' holding the weight. So I think it's safe to say it's pretty accurate.

I agree with others about Dr's scales or gym scales. People are on and off those things left and right. Sure, I can tell you it's not about the number, but I like when my numbers are good too. wink
June 14, 2012 12:35 PM
I weighed myself on my digital scale on the carpet the other day and it said I weighed 26 lbs. laugh

I'd expect the gym scale to be set to mislead people in the other direction. "Better sign up for another year, fatty!" laugh

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