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TOPIC: Water intake, Does Tea count and Coffee???

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December 6, 2012 10:26 AM
I like to drink alot of water ( about 10 cups a day) but with the colder weather its getting harder to drink so much water. When you drink tea does it count as water intake???
December 6, 2012 10:28 AM
I drink unsweet tea throughout the day and I count it as water (since there's nothing else in it).
  8197474
December 6, 2012 10:31 AM
You're shortchanging your body if you count tea and other garbage as water. WATER counts as water. Nothing else.
December 6, 2012 10:32 AM
Water = Water.
I log everything else as the actual item.

Coffee is logged as coffee, tea is logged as tea, etc.

Water is logged as water.
  505046
December 6, 2012 10:32 AM
I don't usually count my coffee as water, but I don't see any reason why you can't count tea, provided you don't add anything to it.
December 6, 2012 10:36 AM
Think about this logically: Adding tea (or any flavoring) to water does not change the water into anything else.

Many people choose not to count those things, but their bodies still recognize the water.

And LMAO at classifying tea as "garbage."
December 6, 2012 10:39 AM
I do count my coffee as coffee, But then I had some tea today beacuse I am so cold and I thought to myself would it count as water since I am only adding the tea bag. Got me thinking.
December 6, 2012 10:40 AM
I count herbal tea as water but if it has caffine or I'm adding milk to it I don't count it.
  28882561
December 6, 2012 10:40 AM
QUOTE:

Think about this logically: Adding tea (or any flavoring) to water does not change the water into anything else.

Many people choose not to count those things, but their bodies still recognize the water.

And LMAO at classifying tea as "garbage."

Yes. I've given up trying to convince people of this obvious fact. The logically challenged will still spout their nonsense.
December 6, 2012 10:40 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Think about this logically: Adding tea (or any flavoring) to water does not change the water into anything else.

Many people choose not to count those things, but their bodies still recognize the water.

And LMAO at classifying tea as "garbage."

Yes. I've given up trying to convince people of this obvious fact. The logically challenged will still spout their nonsense.


*sigh*

I know.
December 6, 2012 10:41 AM
QUOTE:

I do count my coffee as coffee, But then I had some tea today beacuse I am so cold and I thought to myself would it count as water since I am only adding the tea bag. Got me thinking.


Apply this logic to the coffee, as well. Caffeine is not the diuretic people make it out to be. You can count your coffee.
December 6, 2012 10:42 AM
I don't count coffee as water intake, but I do count tea if I don't add sweetener. If you're looking for a way to keep your water intake high in the colder months, try hot water with lemon, which I do a lot this time of year.

And yes, I also giggled at the notion of tea as garbage. :)
December 6, 2012 10:42 AM
I count my tea as water.
  15072989
December 6, 2012 10:43 AM
"Only water is water" - Everyone who doesn't have an elementary-school-level understanding of chemistry.
December 6, 2012 10:44 AM
QUOTE:

And LMAO at classifying tea as "garbage."


Yes! I was shocked someone would call it that. I don't count my water or tea on my diary. If I do want to tally up my liquids, I count my 8oz or 10oz glasses of tea as water. I don't add sugar, milk or anything to my tea.
  17571471
December 6, 2012 10:44 AM
Of course it does. The 8-10 cups/day is nothing more than a guideline to give people something concrete to aim for, it's not necessary to be militant about how you contribute toward your hydration (especially as our daily water intake does not even solely come from what we drink, unless everything you eat is dehydrated).
Edited by ldesaus On December 6, 2012 10:45 AM
December 6, 2012 10:44 AM
I don't see any reason why you couldn't add coffee and tea to your water intake, as long as you're logging the coffee and tea into your daily calories, and being sure to add any milk, sugars, creamer, etc. as well.
Edited by whitmars106 On December 6, 2012 10:46 AM
  31957052
December 6, 2012 10:45 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

And LMAO at classifying tea as "garbage."


Yes! I was shocked someone would call it that. I don't count my water or tea on my diary. If I do want to tally up my liquids, I count my 8oz or 10oz glasses of tea as water. I don't add sugar, milk or anything to my tea.


^^ AGREE!
  23745142
December 6, 2012 10:46 AM
I count only water as water, because my doc said if it's not plain water, it's not water. That being said. He said you can be hydrated by beverages other than water, which I think is the point of your question. So whether it's Mio, or herbal tea or whatever, you can probably in your head figure "yeah I only had six cups of regular water but I drank four cups of herbal tea", etc. I'd probably continue to only log clear water as water, and the other stuff on your food diary portion.
  29374085
December 6, 2012 10:47 AM
Well...

Pretend you are drinking a hot cup of water, and when you are done you suck on a tea bag for 10 minutes...
There you can add the tea... and still add the water to your water count...

Your body is keeping perfect tabs on your WOE (and drinking) no matter what you report to MFP....
  30326427
December 6, 2012 10:50 AM
I'm sitting home feeling like crud drinking cup after cup of herbal tea. I'm logging the tea with a packet of Splenda and not worrying about the 8 cups of water I'm supposed to get because I know decaf herbal tea is going to provide me with the fluids I need.

Coffee with caffeine I think would be different. Although coffee itself doesn't really have any calories it is a diuretic (sp) and will dehydrate you if you use coffee in place of water.
  27530588
December 6, 2012 10:51 AM
QUOTE:

You're shortchanging your body if you count tea and other garbage as water. WATER counts as water. Nothing else.


Image not displayed

So, when you drink water with a meal, what part of the stomach does the water go into so that it doesn't mix with everything else. I don't want my body to confuse the water I drink with any of the other garbage in my stomach.

Also, what magical properties does tea have to zap all of the water out of the pitcher? I KNOW I put water in there...a whole lot of water with very little tea.
  26750457
December 6, 2012 10:51 AM
Your body needs fluids to function. It doesn't care if it's water, soup, tea, coffee, milk, juice, soda, or any other food that contains liquids. An apple is 85% water. The whole drink until you pee yourself every 10 minutes thing is the garbage. If your urine is a pale yellow and you aren't thirsty then you're getting enough fluids. There's no magic weight loss feature to drinking a gallon of water and drinking too much water over works your kidneys and flushes out minerals that you need.

So count any liquid you drink as a fluid if you want to keep track.
December 6, 2012 10:53 AM
i think tea & coffee work as dehydrants.
  21249
December 6, 2012 10:53 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

You're shortchanging your body if you count tea and other garbage as water. WATER counts as water. Nothing else.


Image not displayed

So, when you drink water with a meal, what part of the stomach does the water go into so that it doesn't mix with everything else. I don't want my body to confuse the water I drink with any of the other garbage in my stomach.

Also, what magical properties does tea have to zap all of the water out of the pitcher? I KNOW I put water in there...a whole lot of water with very little tea.


The tea binds with the water and becomes non water so your stomach rejects it and its stored in your fat cells to be later processed by your liver. That's why you shouldn't eat after 7pm, because then your liver is too busy to process the stored nonwater liquids

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