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TOPIC: Is it safe to lose >2 pounds/week?

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November 21, 2012 4:17 PM
I see a lot of people on MFP are on 1200 calorie diets, but I'm currently on a 1450 calorie diet and considering switching to the 1200. The only thing is, that would be more than a 2 pound weight loss per week, for me. I've gradually been eating fewer calories as the days pass until I think I could reasonably sustain 1200/day. I don't want to be a on "very low calorie diet," but it would be appealing to lose weight more quickly if it is actually safe.

EDIT: If I were to do a 1200 calorie diet, I'd lose 2.4 pounds per week (I checked).
Edited by meggwtw On November 21, 2012 4:19 PM
  11984960
November 21, 2012 4:24 PM
is it safe??? yeh u wont die... but for sustained weight loss??? no, because in a nutshell, you slow the metabolism down way too quick. ultimately with lower caloric defecits over a longer period of time you will lose and maintain weight loss and have a higher caloric intake at your goal weight.
  18466206
November 21, 2012 4:34 PM
I'm on a 1200 calorie diet, but according to mfp that only will result in my losing 0.6 pounds a week. I don't have a lot to lose.
November 21, 2012 4:37 PM
For me, it has always been tempting to want to lose weight as fast as possible. A few years ago I cut my calories to about 1000 a day and I lost about 40 lbs in less than 3 months. Then, I was unable to stick to such an extreme diet and when I started eating my regular food again I gained it all back. I have also done low fat diets and low carb diets. Both of which I lost weight on, but again, could not stick with them and gained all my weight and then some back.

So, now here I am 54 lbs of my 115 lbs gone and I am losing slower than I ever have in the past. Is it tempting to try and do it faster? Sometimes, especially when I see people who have started after me begin to catch up to my weight loss or even pass me. But, I will not give in to that temptation. My reason is that I am learning to think differently about food. I don't view my eating as what is going to make me fat, but what is going to nourish my body. I want fuel for my workouts. I have not removed a single thing from my diet. I am learning to eat all things in moderation. A lot of things I eat very seldom because they just aren't worth eating anymore when I workout so hard to get strong.

I also noticed for me that I feel better eating at least 1600 a day sometimes more on my workout days. In the summer I had dropped to 1420 following the MFP recommendation that pops up every now and then when you are losing. My weight loss actually stalled and i felt hungry all the time until I upped my calories again. I am not saying that is for sure going to happen to you, I am just telling you my experience.

The best thing for anyone though is to find something that you can live with always. The yo-yo stuff is out of my life for good. I am so happy and at peace with food now it is a wonderful feeling. I hope you get there too.
  15787162
November 21, 2012 4:38 PM
6 months = 60 lbs here, that's more than 2 a week.
  23798190
November 21, 2012 4:38 PM
As long as you are on a nutrient-rich diet, losing more than 2 pounds a week should not be a problem for your health. It's when you're eating a somewhat toxic diet [that includes sugar, white flour, and the other 'baddies'] that you begin to have a problem, which will undoubtedly result in CRAVINGS to alert you to the fact you are under-nourished.

I've lost an average of 2.95 pounds per week on a plant-based, 70-80% raw diet. I've never felt better or more energized. I only track my calories periodically, but I probably average around 1100-1500 per day. Some days, I eat more than 1500 calories. It just depends on how hungry I feel, as opposed to experiencing crazy cravings - there is a difference. If I'm not able to discern the difference, I get some healthy food in me fast and wait for the feelings to subside. As long as I nourish my body with something nutrient-rich, whatever it was always goes away.

Hollycatflowerforyou
Edited by Hollycat On November 21, 2012 4:42 PM
  501982
November 21, 2012 4:43 PM
There's pluses and minuses to everything. You might find this educational:
http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/setting-the-deficit-small-moderate-or-large.html
  16762840
November 21, 2012 4:44 PM
slow wins the race... if u want to keep it off
  24444724
November 21, 2012 4:46 PM
QUOTE:

slow wins the race... if u want to keep it off


^^^exactly

obviously if you are morbidly obese you can lose more weight per week than 2lbs but for someone trying to drop like 40lbs or less i would even try and say try and lost like 1lb a week and just stay consistant.
  18466206
November 21, 2012 4:50 PM
OK so I know everyone's all 1-2lbs a week max for safety reasons, sustainable weight loss etc BUT I'm from New ZEaland and here we use KG's to weigh ourselves.. Thing is we are told by all our doctor's that safe sustainable weightloss is around 1-2KG a week.. 2kg is 4.4lbs.. that is what's in any info we are given / told etc..

SO anyway my point is some people say 2lbs a week max some say 2kg a week max.. My advice is simply to do what works for you..

Remembering of course that if you feel tired weak, lacking concentration or anything your over doing it and to slow down :)
  26426938
November 21, 2012 4:56 PM
no
November 21, 2012 4:56 PM
QUOTE:

For me, it has always been tempting to want to lose weight as fast as possible. A few years ago I cut my calories to about 1000 a day and I lost about 40 lbs in less than 3 months. Then, I was unable to stick to such an extreme diet and when I started eating my regular food again I gained it all back. I have also done low fat diets and low carb diets. Both of which I lost weight on, but again, could not stick with them and gained all my weight and then some back.

So, now here I am 54 lbs of my 115 lbs gone and I am losing slower than I ever have in the past. Is it tempting to try and do it faster? Sometimes, especially when I see people who have started after me begin to catch up to my weight loss or even pass me. But, I will not give in to that temptation. My reason is that I am learning to think differently about food. I don't view my eating as what is going to make me fat, but what is going to nourish my body. I want fuel for my workouts. I have not removed a single thing from my diet. I am learning to eat all things in moderation. A lot of things I eat very seldom because they just aren't worth eating anymore when I workout so hard to get strong.

I also noticed for me that I feel better eating at least 1600 a day sometimes more on my workout days. In the summer I had dropped to 1420 following the MFP recommendation that pops up every now and then when you are losing. My weight loss actually stalled and i felt hungry all the time until I upped my calories again. I am not saying that is for sure going to happen to you, I am just telling you my experience.

The best thing for anyone though is to find something that you can live with always. The yo-yo stuff is out of my life for good. I am so happy and at peace with food now it is a wonderful feeling. I hope you get there too.


I am currently on the 1200 a day but for me i don't need to lose too much so its a way of shocking my body into fat burning. However, the foods I eat on this calorie level are mostly raw, I think about everything before I put it on my plate. In terms of how it will affect the work i've done already, how it will affect my training and how it will make me feel. I haven't 'cut' a single thing out of my diet because I think it is un-maintainable as well as difficult. If I want to have chicken and rice for dinner, I have it, but I work out exactly how much I can afford to eat based on the calorie restriction. I've found I never feel deprived and i'm getting used to that lovely light feeling of not having a stomach that is completely full all the time. :) So in essence, I agree! :-D
November 21, 2012 4:59 PM
Safe? Sure.


Will you eventually crash and plateau? Absolutely.


Will you keep it off losing at that rate? Unlikely.
November 21, 2012 5:03 PM
QUOTE:

no



^this
  8625464
November 21, 2012 5:05 PM
I eat 1200, some weeks I lose as much as 4 pounds, others I lose less than a pound and sometimes I don't lose for a couple weeks. Your average will depend on how much you have to take off, age, genetics, activity level, and fluids as well as calories and as you get closer to "normal" it will be slower then say when you started. Overall I averaged 1.5 pounds per week for the first few months now I'm closer to .8, do what works for you and don't get afraid because of the people who claim you'll just gain it back. People don't gain weight because they lost it too fast, they gain because they over eat and under exercise when they stop counting because they reached their goal and start behaving as they did before they found MFP or whatever diet plan they followed.
Edited by minkakross On November 21, 2012 5:05 PM
  4254825
November 21, 2012 5:06 PM
QUOTE:

I see a lot of people on MFP are on 1200 calorie diets, but I'm currently on a 1450 calorie diet and considering switching to the 1200. The only thing is, that would be more than a 2 pound weight loss per week, for me. I've gradually been eating fewer calories as the days pass until I think I could reasonably sustain 1200/day. I don't want to be a on "very low calorie diet," but it would be appealing to lose weight more quickly if it is actually safe.

EDIT: If I were to do a 1200 calorie diet, I'd lose 2.4 pounds per week (I checked).


The more fat you have the more you can get away with. When I first started MFP i weighed like 343, I lost 20lbs in 3 weeks. here is a pretty good chart to go by.

Men Categories
Category 1: less than 15% bodyfat.
Category 2: 16-25% bodyfat
Category 3: 26 > bodyfat

Women Categories
Category 1: Less than 24% bodyfat.
Category 2: 25-35% bodyfat
Category 3: 35% > bodyfat.

I would say Category 2 can lose about 2lbs a week, category 3, more than 2lbs a week, category 1 about 1lbs a week.
There are more advanced methods to lose weight quickly, but they're out of the scope of this topic, and I won't tell people without experience, it will more likely lead to failure.
Edited by Pu_239 On November 21, 2012 5:09 PM
  11390926
November 21, 2012 5:27 PM
You're gonna kill your skin's elasticity with losing weight too fast. No one wants saggy flabs of skin hanging off them once the diet is over!
November 21, 2012 7:04 PM
QUOTE:

I eat 1200, some weeks I lose as much as 4 pounds, others I lose less than a pound and sometimes I don't lose for a couple weeks. Your average will depend on how much you have to take off, age, genetics, activity level, and fluids as well as calories and as you get closer to "normal" it will be slower then say when you started. Overall I averaged 1.5 pounds per week for the first few months now I'm closer to .8, do what works for you and don't get afraid because of the people who claim you'll just gain it back. People don't gain weight because they lost it too fast, they gain because they over eat and under exercise when they stop counting because they reached their goal and start behaving as they did before they found MFP or whatever diet plan they followed.


this is what i think too. when i get to my goal weight, i'll slowly up my calories from 1200 to maintanance level. i don't see why that would result in gaining it all back. with how easy it was to lose weight, i'm not even sure why i got to the weight i was in the first place.
November 21, 2012 7:08 PM
QUOTE:

For me, it has always been tempting to want to lose weight as fast as possible. A few years ago I cut my calories to about 1000 a day and I lost about 40 lbs in less than 3 months. Then, I was unable to stick to such an extreme diet and when I started eating my regular food again I gained it all back. I have also done low fat diets and low carb diets. Both of which I lost weight on, but again, could not stick with them and gained all my weight and then some back.

So, now here I am 54 lbs of my 115 lbs gone and I am losing slower than I ever have in the past. Is it tempting to try and do it faster? Sometimes, especially when I see people who have started after me begin to catch up to my weight loss or even pass me. But, I will not give in to that temptation. My reason is that I am learning to think differently about food. I don't view my eating as what is going to make me fat, but what is going to nourish my body. I want fuel for my workouts. I have not removed a single thing from my diet. I am learning to eat all things in moderation. A lot of things I eat very seldom because they just aren't worth eating anymore when I workout so hard to get strong.


Like the above poster, I lost a quick amount in 3 months: 38 pounds. I couldn't keep up the low-cal eating and eventually gained all my weight back and more. So here I am, bigger than ever, trying to do it the right way.

I like what the poster states about thinking of food as nourishment.
November 21, 2012 7:11 PM
QUOTE:

I see a lot of people on MFP are on 1200 calorie diets, but I'm currently on a 1450 calorie diet and considering switching to the 1200. The only thing is, that would be more than a 2 pound weight loss per week, for me. I've gradually been eating fewer calories as the days pass until I think I could reasonably sustain 1200/day. I don't want to be a on "very low calorie diet," but it would be appealing to lose weight more quickly if it is actually safe.

EDIT: If I were to do a 1200 calorie diet, I'd lose 2.4 pounds per week (I checked).


If you did a 1,200 calorie diet you'd lose 2.4lbs IN THEORY. Assuming your TDEE calculation is right, your intake and workout is correct. That you maintain a constant activity level everyday, and you don't stall out a week later.
  11390926
November 21, 2012 7:11 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I eat 1200, some weeks I lose as much as 4 pounds, others I lose less than a pound and sometimes I don't lose for a couple weeks. Your average will depend on how much you have to take off, age, genetics, activity level, and fluids as well as calories and as you get closer to "normal" it will be slower then say when you started. Overall I averaged 1.5 pounds per week for the first few months now I'm closer to .8, do what works for you and don't get afraid because of the people who claim you'll just gain it back. People don't gain weight because they lost it too fast, they gain because they over eat and under exercise when they stop counting because they reached their goal and start behaving as they did before they found MFP or whatever diet plan they followed.


this is what i think too. when i get to my goal weight, i'll slowly up my calories from 1200 to maintanance level. i don't see why that would result in gaining it all back. with how easy it was to lose weight, i'm not even sure why i got to the weight i was in the first place.
You should be upping to maintenance the closer you get to your goal - not when you reach it. If you only have a few lbs to lose, you shouldn't pursue something stupid like a massive deficit.
Edited by geekyjock76 On November 21, 2012 7:13 PM
  17993426
November 21, 2012 7:13 PM
I also think it matters greatly how much you have to lose and also don't think it's sustainable over a long period of time. What I have found that is working for me is cutting calories more drastically for two to three weeks, and then switching to maintaining for two to three weeks. Almost everyone goes through plateaus, I'm just controlling mine as much as possible. In the end, my average is probably the same as someone that looses one or two pounds a week, but I find this method easier.
  3032330
November 21, 2012 7:17 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I eat 1200, some weeks I lose as much as 4 pounds, others I lose less than a pound and sometimes I don't lose for a couple weeks. Your average will depend on how much you have to take off, age, genetics, activity level, and fluids as well as calories and as you get closer to "normal" it will be slower then say when you started. Overall I averaged 1.5 pounds per week for the first few months now I'm closer to .8, do what works for you and don't get afraid because of the people who claim you'll just gain it back. People don't gain weight because they lost it too fast, they gain because they over eat and under exercise when they stop counting because they reached their goal and start behaving as they did before they found MFP or whatever diet plan they followed.


this is what i think too. when i get to my goal weight, i'll slowly up my calories from 1200 to maintanance level. i don't see why that would result in gaining it all back. with how easy it was to lose weight, i'm not even sure why i got to the weight i was in the first place.
You should be upping to maintenance the closer you get to your goal - not when you reach it. If you only have a few lbs to lose, you shouldn't pursue something stupid like a massive deficit.


I fail to see why eating a 1200 calorie diet is stupid. I'm also not convinced that it's a massive deficit for a 38 year old 5'4" woman in the first place. If I wind up a few pounds lower than goal weight, that's not a terrible thing.
Edited by Aviva92 On November 21, 2012 7:18 PM
November 21, 2012 7:18 PM
Yes it is safe. Especially if you have a lot of weight to lose. It is all individual. All the rules that we hear are just guidelines. Each individual and their physiology is different. The smaller you get ,of course, the harder it will be to lose that much weight as quickly. I eat 1600 calories a day and I have lost more than 2 lbs a week (started at 185 lbs). 1200 calories isn't enough for me personally. I feel sluggish and have no energy to work out if I eat anything less than 1400 calories. smile
Edited by LoveAlwaysAlisa On November 21, 2012 7:22 PM
  27753795
November 21, 2012 7:28 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I eat 1200, some weeks I lose as much as 4 pounds, others I lose less than a pound and sometimes I don't lose for a couple weeks. Your average will depend on how much you have to take off, age, genetics, activity level, and fluids as well as calories and as you get closer to "normal" it will be slower then say when you started. Overall I averaged 1.5 pounds per week for the first few months now I'm closer to .8, do what works for you and don't get afraid because of the people who claim you'll just gain it back. People don't gain weight because they lost it too fast, they gain because they over eat and under exercise when they stop counting because they reached their goal and start behaving as they did before they found MFP or whatever diet plan they followed.


this is what i think too. when i get to my goal weight, i'll slowly up my calories from 1200 to maintanance level. i don't see why that would result in gaining it all back. with how easy it was to lose weight, i'm not even sure why i got to the weight i was in the first place.
You should be upping to maintenance the closer you get to your goal - not when you reach it. If you only have a few lbs to lose, you shouldn't pursue something stupid like a massive deficit.


I fail to see why eating a 1200 calorie diet is stupid. I'm also not convinced that it's a massive deficit for a 38 year old 5'4" woman in the first place. If I wind up a few pounds lower than goal weight, that's not a terrible thing.
Tell me. How did you come up with this 1200 estimate? Did you eat at maintenance before and knew exactly how many calories you needed to maintain prior to fat loss and what type of deficit you were creating?
  17993426

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