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TOPIC: Brine or dry rub?

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November 20, 2012 5:27 AM
This is my second year at preparing the Thanksgiving turkey. Last year, thanks to the advice of my MFP friends, I brined and it was fabulous!!! I've always wanted to try a dry rub, but don't know how to execute the technique.

Which do you prefer brine or dry rub?

I am curious. Can both be employed? Image not displayed
  7030416
November 20, 2012 5:34 AM
I've done both and both methods can be used on the same bird.

Brining can make the skin a little rubbery and hard to crisp, however. If you want a crispy skin be sure to pat the bird dry before popping in the oven. Then, pull the foil away for the last 45 minutes or so. Baste and/or brush on some kind of oil or butter based sauce.

This year I am going with the rub. Roasting with an onion, garlic and thyme inside the bird. Flavor only, not to consume. It always roasts up better when I have a Knob Creek on the Rocks nearby. Or, Maybe, Wild Turkey to celebrate the occasion.

Enjoy the holiday.
  10050918
November 20, 2012 5:37 AM
Thanks! That sounds fabulous!

I love to cook and only recently learned how much fun it is to cook the Thanksgiving turkey. There are so many techniques. I never knew! I want to try them all!

Have a great holiday yourself! happy
  7030416
November 20, 2012 5:38 AM
I prefer brine but as mentioned above, it affects the skin. Dry rub after brining sounds really cool.
November 20, 2012 5:39 AM
Separate the skin from the meat in a large pocket, so to speak, and put all of the seasoning between the skin and the meat. You don't want to detatch the skin, just run you rhand under the skin far enough back to seperate it.

You can then use a little butter against the meat, and then add the rub/seasonings. I do an apple cider-based recipe. :)

When you are done with that, boil some water while you use toothpicks to "pin" the skin back in place (my husband says I'm pinning the pocket shut), and por boiling water over the skin. It will shrink back to a more normal size, and will seal the rub in place between the skin and meat.

You can fill the bird with whatever you want... when I go with the apple cider one, I fill with apples and onions.


Oh, and drinking champagne while cooking Thanksgiving Dinner/Lunch is essential to the baking process. laugh bigsmile
Edited by kitigonkukoo On November 20, 2012 5:40 AM
November 20, 2012 5:40 AM
After listening to the MSL channel's Thanksgiving Hotline for much of the day yesterday, it seems that brining is most popular among most cooks. Tried it once, it did add moisture, but I thought it made the stuffing taste a bit too salty. If I did it again, I'd prob just stuff the bird with veggies for flavor and roast the stuffing separately. Great tip for a crispy skin: start the bird roasting at a VERY high temp(425-450) for about 20 minutes, then finish the cooking time at 325.
  6752387
November 20, 2012 5:40 AM
I usually brine it, but this year I'm doing a dry brine because I keep hearing how fabulous it is. I've done the technique on chickens before and they were the best I've ever made, so I figured I'd try it with a turkey. Here's the recipe I'm using:

http://www.food52.com/recipes/15069_russ_parsons_drybrined_turkey_aka_the_judy_bird
November 20, 2012 5:43 AM
QUOTE:

After listening to the MSL channel's Thanksgiving Hotline for much of the day yesterday, it seems that brining is most popular among most cooks. Tried it once, it did add moisture, but I thought it made the stuffing taste a bit too salty. If I did it again, I'd prob just stuff the bird with veggies for flavor and roast the stuffing separately. Great tip for a crispy skin: start the bird roasting at a VERY high temp(425-450) for about 20 minutes, then finish the cooking time at 325.


We don't stuff the bird at my house anyway. We're southern. It's dressing all the way!

Coincidentally, this will be my first year making the cornbread dressing, but only because I can't trust anyone else to do it. LOL!
  7030416
November 20, 2012 5:51 AM
Cajun marinade to inject, with a cajun rub. I highly recommend the injections, makes the bird amazing!
  28220071
November 20, 2012 5:56 AM
BRINE!
  30099101
November 20, 2012 5:56 AM
I do a dry rub of seasonings and I stuff the turkey with carrots, celery, onion and an orange. Like someone else mentioned, make sure that you rub underneath the skin to ensure that it gets into the meat. Once I've done the rub and stuffed the turkey, I pour a mixture of champagne and chicken broth over it to ensure that it stays juicy.

Good luck with your turkey. flowerforyou
  28961873
November 20, 2012 5:56 AM
QUOTE:

I've done both and both methods can be used on the same bird.

Brining can make the skin a little rubbery and hard to crisp, however. If you want a crispy skin be sure to pat the bird dry before popping in the oven. Then, pull the foil away for the last 45 minutes or so. Baste and/or brush on some kind of oil or butter based sauce.

This year I am going with the rub. Roasting with an onion, garlic and thyme inside the bird. Flavor only, not to consume. It always roasts up better when I have a Knob Creek on the Rocks nearby. Or, Maybe, Wild Turkey to celebrate the occasion.

Enjoy the holiday.


Knob Creek on the rocks! My fave!!! happy

To answer the question, I have always done a dry rub. I apply the dry rub spices up to 24 hours ahead, roast at a higher heat for the first 20 minutes then back down to 325 degrees for the remainder, basting every hour or so.

Happy Thanksgiving!
November 20, 2012 5:58 AM
Brine--it's very scientific and actually gets all the flavor and moisture into the meat, whereas a rub just puts it on the outside.
  5812119
November 20, 2012 6:00 AM
Both so you can have a juicy bird with crispy skin :)
  9391090
November 20, 2012 6:01 AM
QUOTE:

Both so you can have a juicy bird with crispy skin :)


I really want to do both. I'll have to research this some more.
  7030416
November 20, 2012 6:03 AM
I don't do either - I rub my bird with Crisco, put in a 450 oven & immediately drop the temp to 350 and roast 20 mins. per pound. It's always beautifully browned and tender & juicy.
November 20, 2012 6:05 AM
I brine mine overnight. Then rinse it and pat it dry before putting it in the roasting pan. Last year I covered my turkey with a cheese cloth that had been soaked in turkey stock and seasonings then continued to baste it throughout the cooking time. It turned out the be the tastiest and prettiest bird I've ever made, was very proud of it!
November 20, 2012 6:10 AM
QUOTE:

I brine mine overnight. Then rinse it and pat it dry before putting it in the roasting pan. Last year I covered my turkey with a cheese cloth that had been soaked in turkey stock and seasonings then continued to baste it throughout the cooking time. It turned out the be the tastiest and prettiest bird I've ever made, was very proud of it!

Trying this for my Christmas bird!
  17054306
November 20, 2012 6:11 AM
QUOTE:

I brine mine overnight. Then rinse it and pat it dry before putting it in the roasting pan. Last year I covered my turkey with a cheese cloth that had been soaked in turkey stock and seasonings then continued to baste it throughout the cooking time. It turned out the be the tastiest and prettiest bird I've ever made, was very proud of it!


You know, I can never find cheesecloth. But this method does sound interesting.
  7030416
November 20, 2012 6:16 AM
We found it in the craft section of our store. I found the recipe on tv show The Chew.
November 20, 2012 6:17 AM
QUOTE:

I don't do either - I rub my bird with Crisco, put in a 450 oven & immediately drop the temp to 350 and roast 20 mins. per pound. It's always beautifully browned and tender & juicy.


Are you serious?
November 20, 2012 6:20 AM
Brine! The last two years we bought an already brined turkey from Trader Joe's. The lazy way out, but turned out great. And I didn't have to get rid of a cooler full of brine...
November 20, 2012 6:22 AM
QUOTE:

Brine! The last two years we bought an already brined turkey from Trader Joe's. The lazy way out, but turned out great. And I didn't have to get rid of a cooler full of brine...


I just treat like I'm marinating meat. I place it in a regular roaster bag and tie it up. Let it sit in the fridge over night. Then I pour out the brine and just place the turkey in a new roaster bag. Much less mess.
  7030416
November 20, 2012 6:26 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I don't do either - I rub my bird with Crisco, put in a 450 oven & immediately drop the temp to 350 and roast 20 mins. per pound. It's always beautifully browned and tender & juicy.


Are you serious?
November 20, 2012 6:27 AM
Well, yes, I'm serious. Actually, it's in The Joy of Cooking, but it's also how my mom did it for 80+ years.

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