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TOPIC: Calling all Coconut oil lovers

 
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November 27, 2012 4:14 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Just reading how, when ingested, it is one of the only directly absorbed into the cells form of energy, never stored as fat and converted into energy immediately

Wow!
Do you have any evidence for these wild assertions?
Coconut oil is fine but it isn't magical.

While we're at it, please provide any evidence that "oil pulling" has any efficacy whatsoever. Deepak Chopra doesn't count.
All pseudoscience.


I haven't read through them all so don't shoot the messenger, but....:
Dietetic supplementation with coconut oil does not cause dyslipidemia and seems to promote a reduction in abdominal obesity. (http://www.springerlink.com/content/02ngg2413wm2w630/)
MCT (MCFA) increase energy expenditure, may result in faster satiety and facilitate weight control when included in the diet (http://jn.nutrition.org/content/132/3/329.abstract)
MCFA hold potential as weight loss agents. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024320597011430)
Consumption of a diet rich in Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) results in greater loss of adipose tissue compared with Long Chain Triglycerides (LCT), perhaps due to increased energy expenditure and fat oxidation observed with MCT intake. Thus, MCTs may be considered as agents that aid in the prevention of obesity and potentially stimulate weight loss. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12634436?dopt=Abstract)
Consumption of MCT enhances Energy Expenditure and fat oxidation in obese women, when compared to LCT consumption. Substitution of MCT for LCT prevents long-term weight gain via increased EE. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12532160)
Oxidization of dietary fat results in diminished fat storage, loss of Body Weight and reduction in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Furthermore, MCT consumption stimulates Energy Expenditure and fat oxidation. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12975635)
November 27, 2012 4:23 AM
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  7518968
November 27, 2012 4:24 AM
def need to buy me some coconut oil!!
November 27, 2012 4:59 AM
Thanks for posting this.

I started taking one teaspoon of coconut oil a few days ago and have noticed a drop in my appetite.

I'm really hoping the claims are true that it can have an effect on my metabolism and underactive thyroid.....because so far the standard medical approach of treat the symptoms rather than fix what's gone wrong in the first place hasn't worked for me.
  30277071
December 2, 2012 7:49 AM
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December 2, 2012 9:34 AM
I adore coconut oil! I basically use it wherever I would normally use oil (I use it for stir frys, baking, etc). I also add a tablespoon to my coffee in the morning.
  15905410
December 2, 2012 9:40 AM
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  14276110
December 2, 2012 9:40 AM
I cook with coconut in some dishes (Asian ones).

For the most part, I use it for my skin. I started using a tiny amount as a face moisturizer and then started using it all over. My skin is so soft, clear, and has a nice glow! :)
December 2, 2012 9:44 AM
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December 2, 2012 9:48 AM
I fully endorse it, and MCT Oil, for nearly everything: tremendous pre-workout energy source for those on ketogenic diets, exceptional skin and hair care product, oil pulling for gum and dental health, and cooking.
Edited by Spartan_Maker On December 2, 2012 9:48 AM
  25147453
December 2, 2012 9:49 AM
I use it on my skin too especially before and after a run x
  25144776
December 2, 2012 9:50 AM
don't usually cook with it(except fish), but take it by the spoonfull prior to workouts
December 2, 2012 9:56 AM
QUOTE:

I have read many good things about coconut oil. I do cook with it, but if I have too much it gives me acid reflux. Does anyone else have this problem?

Yes, it will give me reflux sometimes, but usually only when I exceed 2T per day or if I have it too late at night. And it's not the only oil that causes that problem for me.
  17225453
December 2, 2012 10:56 AM
I prefer to cook with block creamed coconut where possible for the fibre and minerals as well as the lauric acid. Also purchased coconut flour for baking, still 8% fat.
December 3, 2012 2:30 AM
For the Aussies looking for coconut oil, you can get it at Coles and Woolworths (look in the health food section or near the gluten free stuff) as well as most health food stores. Melrose is a common brand and we tend to get it in large and clear glass jars (it looks white).
  28828599
December 3, 2012 3:04 AM
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  11862704
December 3, 2012 3:12 AM
QUOTE:

I saute my chicken in it. It's great for stir fry. It's great for any dish that requires high heat because it won't turn rancid at high heat like other cooking oils. It's fantastic on the skin as well. So many health benefits.

I see people say all the time that coconut oil has such a high smoke point, but it isn't true. Refined coconut oil has a relatively high smoke point, but virgin coconut oil actually has a very low smoke point (under 350 degrees, lower than extra virgin olive oil.)

Not a bad ingredient to use, but I certainly wouldn't try with it.
December 3, 2012 3:15 AM
Love coconut oil, reminds me i am out!!! laugh
  19102823
December 3, 2012 3:32 AM
http://www.naturalnews.com/036554_extra_virgin_coconut_oil_health.html

Interesting little article about coconut oil. I love using it for stir frying and popcorn.

Monica

P.S. Here's a local article for me about someone who claimed it helped her husband who has Alzheimer's.

http://www.tampabay.com/news/aging/article879333.ece
Edited by monicalosesweight On December 3, 2012 3:33 AM
  24345402
December 3, 2012 4:39 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I saute my chicken in it. It's great for stir fry. It's great for any dish that requires high heat because it won't turn rancid at high heat like other cooking oils. It's fantastic on the skin as well. So many health benefits.

I see people say all the time that coconut oil has such a high smoke point, but it isn't true. Refined coconut oil has a relatively high smoke point, but virgin coconut oil actually has a very low smoke point (under 350 degrees, lower than extra virgin olive oil.)

Not a bad ingredient to use, but I certainly wouldn't try with it.



Very good info about the smoke point. I sautee with coconut oil as much as possible and I have to consciously remember to keep the temperature lower than I normally would. The great thing is though, even when burnt, the oil still tastes pretty good.

Another note, coconut oil stays good indefinitely, unlike most oils which have an expiration date.
December 3, 2012 6:09 AM
The evidence that coconut oil is super-healthful is not convincing and these claims appear to be more testimonials than clinical evidence.

There is very limited evidence on disease outcomes, says Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH, of Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health. "All that has been studied well is the impact of coconut oil on cholesterol levels and the findings are intriguing but we still don't know if it is harmful or beneficial," Mozaffarian says.

Neither the American Heart Association (AHA) nor the U.S. government's 2010 Dietary Guidelines suggest that coconut oil is any better or preferable over other saturated fats. Coconut oil, like all saturated fats, should be limited to 7%-10% of calories because it can increase risk for heart disease, according to the AHA and 2010 Dietary Guidelines.

"But even though coconut oil is cholesterol-free, it is still a saturated fat that needs to be limited in the diet and if you are looking for real health benefits, switch from saturated fats to unsaturated fats by using vegetable oils like soybean, canola, corn, or olive oil," says Kris-Etherton, a member of the 2005 Dietary Guidelines advisory committee and Institute of Medicine's panel on dietary reference intakes for macronutrients (which include fats).

(See WEB MD @ http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/coconut-oil-and-health)
December 3, 2012 7:02 AM
QUOTE:

The evidence that coconut oil is super-healthful is not convincing and these claims appear to be more testimonials than clinical evidence.

There is very limited evidence on disease outcomes, says Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH, of Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health. "All that has been studied well is the impact of coconut oil on cholesterol levels and the findings are intriguing but we still don't know if it is harmful or beneficial," Mozaffarian says.

Neither the American Heart Association (AHA) nor the U.S. government's 2010 Dietary Guidelines suggest that coconut oil is any better or preferable over other saturated fats. Coconut oil, like all saturated fats, should be limited to 7%-10% of calories because it can increase risk for heart disease, according to the AHA and 2010 Dietary Guidelines.

"But even though coconut oil is cholesterol-free, it is still a saturated fat that needs to be limited in the diet and if you are looking for real health benefits, switch from saturated fats to unsaturated fats by using vegetable oils like soybean, canola, corn, or olive oil," says Kris-Etherton, a member of the 2005 Dietary Guidelines advisory committee and Institute of Medicine's panel on dietary reference intakes for macronutrients (which include fats).

(See WEB MD @ http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/coconut-oil-and-health)


It's hard for govt to change their stance now if they don't want to completely embarrass themselves. The problem so far is actually proving that: 1) there actually is a safe lower level of saturated fat deemed acceptable. 2) The premise that LDL cholesterol is the cause of heart disease. Pretty easy stuff really considering they've thrown billions of dollars towards these goals over the last 40 years and come up with zilch, nada....only weak correlation. Get this, they lowered the recommended intake of saturated fat to 7% of total calories, without a real reason and this is after a full blown study trying to find that safe lower level that I mentioned above, and the conclusion of that multi-million dollar study was they couldn't find a safe lower level. What that means is they could really find anything wrong with the consumption of saturated fat.....perfect example of govt bureaucracy
.
Indigenous peoples of tropical latitudes have been consuming coconut oil for tens of thousands of years without any problems, well until modern western diet intervention. The Kitavans of Papua New Guinea are a perfect example of keeping it simple.....I just can't imagine going there and telling them they should switch to corn or soy oil (subsidized crops in the USA) and keep a straight face, seriously.

Take a look.
http://healwithfood.org/diet/kitavan-diet-foods.php
Edited by neanderthin On December 3, 2012 7:04 AM
December 3, 2012 8:04 AM
QUOTE:

Where do you all use the coconut oil? Is it in pill form as a supplement, or is it something you use for cooking? What brands do you use? Sorry if these are dumb questions, but I'd like to find out more about this.


I use coconut oil for so many things..............

I cook and bake with Coconut oil.

It is my preferred facial cleanser and moisturizer.

I use coconut oil as a base for soaps, shampoo, tooth paste and deodorant. I also use coconut oil as hair / scalp moisturizer and for shaving.


Coconut oil is anti-bacterial, good to gargle when you have a sore throat, amonst many other things. I have gotten several people that suffer with acne, psoriasis and eczema to use coconut oil as a skin moisturizer and their skin has cleared up beautifully.

My favorite brands are Nutiva and Tropical Traditions.
Edited by PaleoPath4Lyfe On December 3, 2012 8:06 AM
December 3, 2012 8:08 AM
QUOTE:

Thanks for posting this.

I started taking one teaspoon of coconut oil a few days ago and have noticed a drop in my appetite.

I'm really hoping the claims are true that it can have an effect on my metabolism and underactive thyroid.....because so far the standard medical approach of treat the symptoms rather than fix what's gone wrong in the first place hasn't worked for me.



I know from my personal experience that Coconut oil has helped tremendously with my underactive Thyroid. It wasn't an overnight healing......but after 3 years of consistent use of Raw coconut oil and other coconut products I have went from using 2 grains of Armour Thyroid down to 1/2 grain of Armour Thyroid (that is half of one pill).
December 3, 2012 8:29 AM
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