Message Boards » Success Stories

TOPIC: Any one out loosing weight with Thyroid issues

 
Ic_disabled_photos
Topic has been inactive for 30 days or more and images have been disabled.
Display All Images
November 18, 2012 6:07 PM
not sure why some say you need t3 and t4 meds. conflicting research/info out there i think. i've only had synthroid my entire life and have been able to lose ok--yeah it's hard but not impossible.
November 18, 2012 6:56 PM
My thyroid was diagnosed as being underactive about 15 years ago and it has got progressively worse. I am now over the recommended maximum dose of thyroxine daily. Since I started on mfp I have been astounded I have been able to lose weight as was told just to accept my weight and give up on trying to shift those pounds. It will probably come off slower than the average person but it is still possible, I am living proof. And I have been in a wheelchair the whole time due to ankle reconstruction so have shed the pounds with no exercise either! Stick with it and you will see results! smile
  28783759
November 18, 2012 7:02 PM
Not sure why this is in success stories (unless it's because you're looking specifically for thyroid success stories).

My thyroid's been out for ten years this December, and as a result of pretty poor endos (i've been through quite a few), I've been both severely underdosed and severely overdosed, both times causing severe adrenal issues (the first resulting in my adrenal glands starting to shut down!)... both of these instances resulted in weight gain regardless of my diet/fitness (as I never had overeating issues; if anything, undereating for too long)... and that's why I came to this site!

I've lost weight, but not nearly as quickly as lots around me, or as quickly as I did the first time my adrenals went down the ****ter. I shoot for under 180g of carbs because my endo says it's a good plan for anyone with thyroid/hormonal issues. I've built muscle and lost inches though pretty regularly... so my advice is to try and focus on those things and not pay attention to the scale :/ It will kill you.

And goddammit, it's "losing," not "loosing"!
Edited by firstsip On November 18, 2012 7:02 PM
November 18, 2012 7:06 PM
QUOTE:

Just wondering how people loose weight with an under active thyroid and keep it off. I go up and down in weight like its nothing. Have been on a thyroid medicine for about 3 years and have ranged from the same 40lbs throughout the whole time.

Thanks
Amber


Yup, I've been on thyroid medicine since right before I started this journey a little over 3 years ago when I was still obese. I found that it was not a magic pill. I still had to do the hard work.

There is no mystery to weight loss, everyone thinks something is wrong, their metabolism is broken, they have low thyroid, they have menopause or whatever issue, they are as unique as a snowflake, whatever. I thought a lot of these things once too but once the doctor helped resolve the health issues for me I learned there is still no magic pill. Most people eat more than they need to and are not at good at estimating calories as they think they are. Most people have a lower BMR than they think they do. The only way to know for sure is to go to a lab and have it tested. It doesn't seem fair to have to eat less and feel a little hunger. It's hard to face the truth of it, very hard. It's not fun. It's drudgery at times. But if you learn to enjoy your smaller amounts of food (necessary to lose weight, since the reason we got fat in the first place was eating too much whether we knew it or not), and rejoice in your victories it can be done.

Your body loses weight in chunks, not linear. I have found that you can do everything right and your weight loss seems to plateau but if you are patient and keep exercising and eating at a deficit (however slight) you will lose it, it will suddenly "whoosh". There are so many variables for the scale; water retention, digestion, hormones, allergies, sodium, carbs, water intake, DOMS, inflammation, the list goes on. People mistakenly think they lose or gain weight when they eat more or less because of these fluctuations.

Losing weight requires tremendous patience. You will not lose it when you want it or where you want it. The body does its thing. Some apparent plateaus can last a month or so. You cannot make it happen faster. You must focus on two things; calories and exercise. Nothing else matters. Scales and metrics don't matter. The day in and day out grind of exercise and calories are all that matters. It is not very exciting until things fall into place. You get your victories and you ride one victory to the next.

The scale is a trend tool. The scale is good but put it away and only check once a week and only use it as a trend tool. It will fluctuate, it does not matter. Take front side and back progress pictures at least once a month. You will see differences that the metrics won't tell you and it's that little bit of NSV that will keep you going until the next victory.

If you plug in all your info (typically age, gender, height and weight) into one of those calculators what you get is the average metabolic rate of a group of people who share your age, sex, height and weight. What you DON’T get is YOUR EXACT calorie needs.

To say eat more is wrong.

To say eat less is wrong.

To find the exact calories needed for YOU to be in a healthy sustainable calorie deficit is the right answer. Wait, if you need to adjust by 100 do it, wait, adjust, wait, adjust, wait. The tortoise wins this race.

All that matters is calories. A healthy balanced diet within a calorie budget for a deficit that is right for YOU is all that matters for weight loss. Don't make it complicated.

Too many changes at once can be hard on some people. I've always eaten healthy so it easy for me to simply eat less. Eating at a calorie deficit is hard on people; even a small deficit puts your body in a state of flux with hormones and such. Everyone is different. Some people can handle a deeper calorie deficit than others, this is not right or wrong, it just is. Stress in your life affects your hunger hormones; lack of sleep, fatigue, job stress, family stress, financial stress, etc. Add in emotional eating issues and it gets even more complicated. Most people can only handle so much change/stress at once, they try to do too much and fail. Sometimes it might be a better strategy to eat at maintenance and make some small changes first, it really depends on how much stress you are taking in at the moment.
  16440072
November 18, 2012 7:11 PM
QUOTE:

I've been on thyroid medication for 20yrs. My weight has yoyo'd during this time but I think it had more to do with old bad eating habits than my thyroid smile


I have been on meds for 12 years, but I agree with the above poster to a 't'
IT WAS ME AND MY BAD HABITS!!!! I have had no problem losing the weight and maintaining when I watch what I eat... when I don't, I can pack it back on quite quickly.
  6459278
November 18, 2012 7:14 PM
I've been taking 200 mcg levothyroxine for hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's Thyroiditis) since June of 1999. I'm also diabetic, have PCOS (poly cystic ovary syndrome) and a family history of obesity on both sides. I was also diagnosed with fibromyalgia a few years ago. All the odds seemed to have been stacked against me. But I believe that's all excuses to not reach our full and well deserved potential. Anyone who truly wants to lose the weight & get healthy will do so simply through educating themselves and being consistent and persistent with healthy eating and an exercise program. It's not rocket science but it does require a total commitment and a certain mindset. Best of luck to you.
  12343049
November 18, 2012 7:18 PM
I began taking Synthroid nine years ago. I lost some weight at first, but then gained it back. My bad eating habits were the culprit that caused me to be overweight.
  7597651
November 18, 2012 7:27 PM
I was on Tapazole for a few years and from February 2012 I am on shynthyroid( sintetic hormone) . I went up and down (more up!) 25 pounds. I have counting my calories for the last year or so . What seems to work for me is Dukan Diet - eat as much as I like but certain foods.

I have been vegetarian for the last 18 years and I started eating fish a few years ago ( doctor recomandation) The only things that work for me : active life- gym or yoga,counting calories , healthy - clean eating, over 3 liters of water per day , proteins in the morning , low carb ,low fat diet .little or no alchool( one glass of wine or less per week)

I did all this and the only thing that I got was to gain weight at a slower rate. Since I am in Dukan diet , I started losing weight ( 9 pounds in one month).

Bad habits are real but low thyroid hormones are real too and you can pack up to 40 pounds and keep going if you are not careful.
  5504371
November 18, 2012 7:28 PM
QUOTE:

I've been taking 200 mcg levothyroxine for hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's Thyroiditis) since June of 1999. I'm also diabetic, have PCOS (poly cystic ovary syndrome) and a family history of obesity on both sides. I was also diagnosed with fibromyalgia a few years ago. All the odds seemed to have been stacked against me. But I believe that's all excuses to not reach our full and well deserved potential. Anyone who truly wants to lose the weight & get healthy will do so simply through educating themselves and being consistent and persistent with healthy eating and an exercise program. It's not rocket science but it does require a total commitment and a certain mindset. Best of luck to you.

This ! well said. Thank you.
  5504371
November 18, 2012 7:32 PM
QUOTE:

I've been on thyroid medication for 20yrs. My weight has yoyo'd during this time but I think it had more to do with old bad eating habits than my thyroid smile


Same here. My meds get adjusted constantly as I gain and lose weight. I started losing my weight in August and since then my doctor has increased my dose. I go back in a couple of weeks to get it retested. I thought it was odd that my dose was going up with my loss but even though they kind of go hand in hand, there are other reasons for both.
Edited by lessofme150 On November 18, 2012 7:33 PM
  26949057
November 18, 2012 7:59 PM
I take sinthroid because my thyroid was removed. Are you on meds for thyroid?
  3647041
November 19, 2012 2:48 AM
It can be done! I'm taking Synthroid 125mcg. I have been on MFP for a year and lost a little over 70lbs. I'm sure that my meds have helped but, I have done this through, you guessed it changing my diet and moving my body. I have always been overweight and my thyroid was fine up until a few years ago. So there goes my excuse lol
  12753283
November 19, 2012 2:59 AM
I've lost 37lbs since June and it's all thanks to me switching my thyroid meds!
Fly so miserable on synthetic tyroxine, I won't name brands as there are a few and differs in what country you are in.
I've switched to armour, a natural drug available in many countries like Ireland, uk, USA

I did a lot of research on it and I would advice you to do the same then demand you are changed on to it.

So many people don't realise how much better it is for you!


Feel free to message/adde for any questions!
  3660841
November 19, 2012 8:32 AM
QUOTE:

Just wondering how people loose weight with an under active thyroid and keep it off. I go up and down in weight like its nothing. Have been on a thyroid medicine for about 3 years and have ranged from the same 40lbs throughout the whole time.

Thanks
Amber


Not me personally--but I know someone who had the double whammy of losing weight with thyroid issues AND a back so bad even after surgery that exercise was basically out. It took 3 years but she looks fantastic and that sure motivates me and it made me realize how hollow all my excuses were. It can be done.
November 19, 2012 8:50 AM
I have been on eltroxin for 14 years at this stage - i started at 25mg and now up to 200mg and have been told that it will get progressively worse. Its frustrating for me as it does cause weight gain, it does make it harder to lose, I eventually do lose the weight and then I gain again because my thyroid gets worse grumble

All I can say is do have regular blood tests, watch out for times when you start to feel bad - or even better, make sure people around you know the symptoms as well. As well as weight gain my husband pointed out to me this summer that I was always tired - it was a little lightbulb in my head and off I went for a test....and another increase in tablets. I am stable again and losing weight again. I actually feel more confident this time because I have increased my exercise so much that I actually feel a bit more in control.
November 19, 2012 8:55 AM
I've been on Synthroid for 2 years now. It has been difficult. Although my levels are "normal" it just isn't the same. I have been successful at times by excercising regularly and tracking my calories. I have lost over 30 lbs since July 20th by faithfully tracking. You can be successful but you have to be intentional with thyroid issues. Feel free to add me as a friend. Also, there are a couple of thyroid groups on MFP.
November 19, 2012 12:35 PM
QUOTE:

I've lost 37lbs since June and it's all thanks to me switching my thyroid meds!
Fly so miserable on synthetic tyroxine, I won't name brands as there are a few and differs in what country you are in.
I've switched to armour, a natural drug available in many countries like Ireland, uk, USA

I did a lot of research on it and I would advice you to do the same then demand you are changed on to it.

So many people don't realise how much better it is for you!


Feel free to message/adde for any questions!


It's not better for everyone, though! It's a lifeline for those who have tried every form of T4 only without success, but many people (even those without thyroids) can achieve high success through T4 only, too.

I don't like the endos who advocate T4 only... but I also don't think it's healthy to ONLY advocate T4/T3 as "it's better for you."

Hormones, be it progesterone, estrogen, cortisol, TSH, etc... are all vastly different in different people. Just like not every form of HRT or BC is good for another person, same thing with thyroid meds ;)
November 19, 2012 8:29 PM
Bump for later
  2031283
November 19, 2012 8:47 PM
I've had hypothyroidism for 13 years, since I was 22. I thought weight loss was more challenging, but since using MFP and actually logging calories instead of keeping a mental tally and making assumptions I am losing weight at a reasonable pace. While I don't lose as fast as MFP tells me I should be, I am pleased with the results. My sister also has hypo, and is using MFP and losing weight too. If your dosage is correct you should be be OK - I can always tell when mine fluctuates - I have restless sleeps, etc - my dosage has been adjusted a few times in the last 4 years, since having kids. Good luck to you!
November 20, 2012 6:10 AM
Ready to chime in also on this. Been on synthroid/levoxyl for 15+ years. First noticed trouble swallowing, thyroid was swelling so much and of course tired all the time. Got diagnosed, started meds and felt great again. Pretty active then so weight not really an issue. Fast forward a few years - new job, kids, unhealthy eating and suddenly realized I had put on 65 pounds. Of course got the TSH tested and was normal so no blaming the meds, time to get in gear. This was 10 years ago, so started watching the calories and found a program I liked, Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle by Tom Venuto (Not sure it is for everyone but worked for me). Over a 8 month period dropped 55 pounds and felt/looked great! Maintained for quite some time and was happy about it. Of course, switch jobs, move twice due to jobs, too much time in the office and restaurants and again I'm back up but this time even 10 pounds bigger. This was about a year and a half ago and was also noticing how incredible tired I was all the time. Argued with doc that TSH was just too high but foolishly listened and allowed just a slight adjustment. 9 months later enough was enough, found another doc who specialized in thyroid issues. One meeting with him and time for some serious changes to the meds. Over 6 months we got it dialed in, energy levels back but weight not going anywhere. Damn, so much for hoping the thyroid would solve it. So after a few months of pretending to watch my diet and exercise, realized the only way it is going to happen is to go all in again. After a week or so found MFP to track the calories, only three weeks in but so much easier than last time. Going back to my old system and so far so good, three weeks in and 12 pounds down - wish I knew how to change original weight on MFP, didn't find it until after I had taken off 4-5 pounds.

SO to answer the original post - yes, you can lose weight with Thyroid issues. Not really any different than anyone else, weight loss occurs when you burn more calories than consume. Of course, you must work with your doctor to make sure you are on correct dosage no matter what brand/type you take so you can have the energy needed to do the work and your body is functioning as close to normal as possible, maybe even a dietitian to get a better idea of true BMR. After that, it is all about the individual effort in watching the intake and burning as much as you can through activity and exercise.

As for me, 12 pounds into 65 goal. Wish me luck as definitely harder this time being ten years older - but just reading all the success stories makes me realize that it is not only possible, but an easy road compared to many.

Happy Thanksgiving to all!
  31778570
November 20, 2012 8:20 AM
I been having hypothyrodism since i was 13 years old so now is been oveer 9 years and had no problem losing weight after I gave birth to my child. I am 135 right now want to lose 20lbs to my originalk weight and is so hard to lose it but I know.. my body is diffrent take pills everyday, check up 3 to 6months and my trick behind excersice walk for an hour can't do cardio or i gain weight.
November 20, 2012 8:27 AM
I had my thyroid removed in May 2010 while I was pregnant. In the little over a year since my surgery I had gained over 50lbs. At the beginning of the year I decided that I didnt' want to be over 200lbs forever. It's taken me 9 months to lose 40 lbs. I HAVE to watch what I eat and I HAVE to work out at least 5-6 days a week. If I slip up even a day or 2 a week I will gain. There's no more 'maintaining', once I hit my goal I'm probably going to have to keep working just to stay there.
November 20, 2012 8:33 AM
I'm going to be my brutally honest self here and I apologize if I hurt anyone's feelings...it's not my intention but it's probably going to happen...

Stop making excuses!

If you're on your thyroid medication and your regular check-up blood work shows your meds are working by putting your thyroid function in the normal range then you're just like everyone else...your thyroid is working normally with the medication. I get tired of people finding excuses for not losing weight and blaming it on something that's totally not part of the problem.

Yes, I was diagnosed with an under active thyroid 3 years ago and my synthroid is on target and my thyroid function is within normal range now with my medication. I still struggle to lose weight but it's because I'm not 100% on top of my game and I eat too much fat & don't do any strength training!! I know what I need to do, I just don't do it.

Bottom line...quit making excuses.
  4981906
November 20, 2012 8:34 AM
I have lost 75lbs with a thyroid condition. You just have to make sure you are taking the right dosage of meds and that your stay consistent w/ your diet and workout. You can't try all the fad diets and you can't follow everyone's diet advice because of your thyroid condition. You have to stick w/ what works for you.
November 20, 2012 9:50 AM
I was running every day 2 -4 miles before being diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. The endo was afraid my heart would over speed and advised me to go sit on the couch until my condition reversed to hypothyroidism. At that time my resting heart rate was 52 bpm and bp was normal. Now too depressing to check my resting heart rate & I am having to take bp meds and hate it.

Ive been on synthroid for about 18 months, and in the past 30 days I have dropped 15 pounds without exercise. (my diary is open) My total focus is on dropping weight. I am at 245# now and will probably start running again very soon.

I havent done the research, but I think one of the reasons Im not having a lot of trouble dropping is due to the fact that first thing in the morning I take the med and then shower and dress before I eat. (I get up early so I can wait 1 hour before eating.)

FWIW: The endo suggested I wait 15 minutes, but the pharmacist suggested 1 hour before breakfast.

Reply

Message Boards » Success Stories

Posts by members, moderators and admins should not be considered medical advice and no guarantee is made against accuracy.