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TOPIC: High rep, low weight has to be worth something, right?

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October 6, 2012 12:19 PM
So I'm stuck at home this weekend, unable to get out to the gym. However I have a incline sit up bench and a pair of 8kg (17.5lb, so total weight for the 2 is 35lb) dumbells that I've started using. The weights a lot loss than I do down the gym, but I've gotta be able to do something with them haven't I?

Tips appreciated, I'm started with 22rep bench presses and am planning on doing 5 sets before moving onto some other presses and curls.
Edited by GuybrushThreepw00d On October 6, 2012 12:23 PM
  14240730
October 6, 2012 12:53 PM
Do pushups till complete exhaustion. Then use the lighter dumbbells. That will make them "feel" a lot heavier. You can also do lunges and prisoner squats to get a good workout.
October 6, 2012 12:56 PM
Started with some straight, incline and decline pushups... But not till exhaustion, I'm pretty much finished now, but will test your theory before I completely finish
  14240730
October 6, 2012 1:07 PM
do a complex

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/screw_cardio_four_complexes_for_a_shredded_physique

i think the tumminello complex would work with dumbbells


and uuugghh please dont be one of those guys who just does upper body stuff. do some freaking squats and deadlifts. boys need an ass too ya know
Edited by meshashesha2012 On October 6, 2012 1:08 PM
  12840602
October 6, 2012 1:25 PM
QUOTE:

boys need an ass too ya know


lol
October 6, 2012 2:58 PM
Do this metabolic routine instead. I'm probably a little stronger than you and I only use 30 lb dumbbells on this. It's 36 mins and you dont need a bench, just about 5 feet of space to work in.

http://www.menshealth.com/mhlists/high-intensity-circuit-routine/goblet-squat.php#slidetop
October 6, 2012 3:06 PM
High rep. low weight workouts build muscle endurance while lower rep higher weight workouts are better for building strength. I think both types of workouts can have a place in your routine. Definitely better than nothing at all!
  6214796
October 6, 2012 3:18 PM
The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.
October 6, 2012 3:19 PM
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Edited by rml_16 On October 6, 2012 3:19 PM
October 6, 2012 3:35 PM
What number is considered "high" rep? I do 15 or 20 depending on the exercise. I'm not exhausted after the first set but I'm pretty wiped by the third. I've heard it said that high rep is for burning calories and losing weight, and low rep for bulking up. Still true?
  10476643
October 6, 2012 3:36 PM
QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


Lulz
October 6, 2012 3:40 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


Lulz


Lulz right back at you. Look it up.
October 6, 2012 3:46 PM
QUOTE:

do a complex

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/screw_cardio_four_complexes_for_a_shredded_physique

i think the tumminello complex would work with dumbbells


and uuugghh please dont be one of those guys who just does upper body stuff. do some freaking squats and deadlifts. boys need an ass too ya know


Meshayup...

The goal with stuff that is less than 50% of max weight is more conditioning. In that sense, you aim to do the most amount of work to fulfill a goal or set range during the least amount of rest.

Work hard, short rest intervals, make you sweat.

Try some Bulgarian Split Squats, I train all my clients on this exercise.
October 6, 2012 3:47 PM
QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


perhaps it's true. but wow you'd have to spend so much more time working out doing it the high weight low rep way. besides that isn't it possible that you'd start to feel it in your joints more than your muscles if you and would have to stop before you got to the point of muscle exhaustion?
  12840602
October 6, 2012 3:50 PM
QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


Effective in what way? Building muscle and/or strength? I guess all those bodybuilders and powerlifters and strongman competitors in the world have been doing it wrong all along. Just lift pink dumbbells until your arms get tired and you'll get there much easier!
October 6, 2012 3:52 PM
The typical MFP fitness enthusiast is probably not going to be in the same situations as strongman competitors.

Most people are looking to improve posture, feel stronger, and have more energy throughout the day. In that sense, working the capacity of slower twitch muscle fibers in a strength training situation should yield benefits.

And for the people who are more intense, sometimes the best way to break a plateau is to do something you've never done before. For example, the famous Kroc Rows where you use high weight and momentum for many reps.
October 6, 2012 3:55 PM
Just do pushups and situps until you can't do them anymore. You can use the weights to do shoulder flys and tricep kickbacks.
  24683313
October 6, 2012 3:56 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


perhaps it's true. but wow you'd have to spend so much more time working out doing it the high weight low rep way. besides that isn't it possible that you'd start to feel it in your joints more than your muscles if you and would have to stop before you got to the point of muscle exhaustion?


Hey there, it should be mandatory to exercise proper form in order to reduce risk of degradation. Focus on strengthening the core, and make sure to balance out exercises that work the entire body.
October 6, 2012 3:57 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


Lulz


Lulz right back at you. Look it up.


Oh that's right, someone, somewhere wrote it and published it on the net. I forget that means that it's true. Meanwhile, everybody actually involved in strength training for any amount of time knows that it's complete hogwash. I love "recent studies" arguments. Never fails to amuse me. I don't even need to read the Sunday comics after this one
October 6, 2012 4:01 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


Effective in what way? Building muscle and/or strength? I guess all those bodybuilders and powerlifters and strongman competitors in the world have been doing it wrong all along. Just lift pink dumbbells until your arms get tired and you'll get there much easier!


Why even use pink dumbbells? Save money and do 2x the reps while holding a paper clip in each finger. Recent studies have shown that paper clips are just as effective as heavy metal
October 6, 2012 4:13 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


Lulz


Lulz right back at you. Look it up.


Oh that's right, someone, somewhere wrote it and published it on the net. I forget that means that it's true. Meanwhile, everybody actually involved in strength training for any amount of time knows that it's complete hogwash. I love "recent studies" arguments. Never fails to amuse me. I don't even need to read the Sunday comics after this one


What is "Low weight"

Isn't it different for everyone?

There are benefits to training in the high rep range as long as there is progression.
October 6, 2012 4:57 PM
QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.

um.. no.. no studies say this..
October 6, 2012 10:33 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


Lulz


Lulz right back at you. Look it up.


Oh that's right, someone, somewhere wrote it and published it on the net. I forget that means that it's true. Meanwhile, everybody actually involved in strength training for any amount of time knows that it's complete hogwash. I love "recent studies" arguments. Never fails to amuse me. I don't even need to read the Sunday comics after this one


What is "Low weight"

Isn't it different for everyone?

There are benefits to training in the high rep range as long as there is progression.


"As long as there is progression". Sure, that's exactly the problem. Doing lots of high rep work is fine, it's better than sitting on the couch. It's good for just getting started and learning the moves and conditioning the body. However, doing high rep work does little for building strength. This means that progression stalls out very quickly. Then you get stuck doing the same weight forever. The whole goal of strength training is progression and high rep training is not conducive to this goal at all.
October 7, 2012 1:20 AM
My understanding is that mid and high reps will encourage the muscle to become engorged with blood (pumped) and cause the muscle fibres to split more (shredding) and then in recvery time the muscle increases in size because there are now more muscle fibres and more blood capillaries, whereas in lifting heavy the weight is carried across the muscle but also more on the connective tendons and the lifting is over a shorter period of time and a longer rest period between sets set so there is less blood pumping and less cardio effect.

I was weightlifting about twenty=odd years ago and I remember the weightligters were always more slight than the bodybuilders but they could handle far more weight with good form.

It all depends on what your goal is - endurance, visual development or strength, but any exercise is better than wht I'm doing right now - sitting typing on a forum! I'm off to paint my shed.
October 7, 2012 11:40 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The most recent studies are saying that low weight/high rep is as effective as high weight/low rep as long as you work your muscles to exhaustion, regardless of which you choose.


Lulz


Lulz right back at you. Look it up.


Oh that's right, someone, somewhere wrote it and published it on the net. I forget that means that it's true. Meanwhile, everybody actually involved in strength training for any amount of time knows that it's complete hogwash. I love "recent studies" arguments. Never fails to amuse me. I don't even need to read the Sunday comics after this one


What is "Low weight"

Isn't it different for everyone?

There are benefits to training in the high rep range as long as there is progression.


"As long as there is progression". Sure, that's exactly the problem. Doing lots of high rep work is fine, it's better than sitting on the couch. It's good for just getting started and learning the moves and conditioning the body. However, doing high rep work does little for building strength. This means that progression stalls out very quickly. Then you get stuck doing the same weight forever. The whole goal of strength training is progression and high rep training is not conducive to this goal at all.



You said, " However, doing high rep work does little for building strength. This means that progression stalls out very quickly."

Progression does not always = strength.

Think of the many ways one can progress. Strength, endurance, hypertrophy, fat loss, calorie burning, more volume, shorter rest periods, longer intervals, etc.

So you can't assume that everyone is training for building strength.

This is MFP... most people just want to look better, feel better etc.

It's best to think about the possibilities, using the tools properly. High reps are a tool, they aren't for everyone, but a smart trainee can use them in a program with great results -- set a goal and shoot for it!!

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