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TOPIC: weighing food

 
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October 1, 2012 8:51 AM
I weigh all of my food like I'm supposed to. What I just want cleared up for me is do I weigh it before it's cooked or after? Because I can weigh my chicken and it's 10 ounces before I cook it and 7 after.
October 1, 2012 8:55 AM
After.
Calories counts are for the cooked food unless otherwise specified. Not like McDonald's which say the quarter pounder if weight before cooking.
  26651988
October 1, 2012 9:34 AM
Everything before. Meat is meant to be weighed in the raw state, 4oz of boneless skinless, chicken breast means 4 oz raw meat. You do this because when it cooks you lose water in the cooking process and it will be a different amount each time.

For example, if you start with 4oz of meat and cook it to a point where it's still moist and juicy inside, it will weigh about 3.25-3.5 oz.
Or if you cook that same 4oz of meat to where it's drier and a bit over cooked, it will weigh about 2.75-3oz.
Both amounts will be 120 calories.

Even if you use an entry for cooked meat, you can't be certain of the guideline that the entry is based off of as far as temp and length of cooking.

That's why whenever you see things involving meat advertised, there is the fine print at the bottom that says that weight is based off of pre-cooked weight.

I worked in a professional kitchen before, and everything is based off of pre-cooked weight. The only time we weigh stuff after it's cooked for any reason is portioning. e.g. you cooked 8oz of meat and want two servings out of it, but now it weighs 6.5oz, so each portion gets 3.25oz of meat.
October 1, 2012 9:39 AM
really, it depends on which food item you choose in the database. You just have to match them. I usually weigh my food cooked, so I make sure the database item I choose says "cooked"
Edited by GauchoMark On October 1, 2012 9:39 AM
  11058666
October 1, 2012 12:04 PM
So, are you even more confused now? huh
  26651988
October 1, 2012 12:09 PM
I know I am. Darn. huh grumble
  28498201
October 1, 2012 12:09 PM
QUOTE:

really, it depends on which food item you choose in the database. You just have to match them. I usually weigh my food cooked, so I make sure the database item I choose says "cooked"


This would be my answer too!

One thing I learned is that what the package says (for instance chicken breasts 4oz/112grams = x amount of calories) means raw weight...because you bought it in its raw form. - unless it says cooked!
Edited by Flowers4Julia On October 1, 2012 12:10 PM
October 1, 2012 12:10 PM
Always after.
  29356687
October 1, 2012 12:10 PM
I weigh them after cooking, helps with my portion control...
  29816043
October 1, 2012 12:10 PM
I weight food before cooking. It's easier for me that way. Do which ever way you want, but stay consistent.
  18511156
October 1, 2012 12:10 PM
QUOTE:

So, are you even more confused now? huh


I am and I might be sorry I read this post..lol..grumble
  3188757
October 1, 2012 12:13 PM
raw weight is the only way that two people could (in theory) take the same piece of steak and one cook it blue rare and still wind up with the same calorie count as that exact same piece of steak cooked to well done which has lost even more water weight. The raw state is the only "sure / common" point you have to start with.

Same way with pasta... if I take 50 grams of dry pasta and cook it al dente it'll take in some water, weigh it out and portion it based on the water weight... but oops how about someone who cooks their pasta long enough that it's about to fall apart from all the water absorbed? Same thing, raw is the only common point to start from to ensure you wind up with the same calorie count.
  3335912
October 1, 2012 12:48 PM
I always weigh mine before, and for vegetables will pick entries saying raw. Most food labels will be based on raw/uncooked weight (so a 400g pack with 4 servings will be 100g/serve), unless the labels says 'as prepared' or something similar.

Just do whats works for you, I don't really want to be weighing once its cooked, I want to eat it!
  15231803
October 1, 2012 1:19 PM
QUOTE:

really, it depends on which food item you choose in the database. You just have to match them. I usually weigh my food cooked, so I make sure the database item I choose says "cooked"


But what if you cooked your meat medium and the entry in the database is for rare meat? Then your cooked meat will weigh less because you've cooked away more of the water and juices so you'll be entering fewer calories than you're actually consuming.

When you go to a restaurant and order a 6oz filet, a 12oz rib-eye, a 1/4lb burger, or a 4oz chicken breast, those aren't weights based on what is on your plate and brought to the table, it's the weight based on what went on the heat in the kitchen. And that's the same way it should be in your kitchen at home.
October 1, 2012 1:22 PM
When you look up chicken (or any meat) in MFP, it will have options that say either "baked" "grilled" "cooked" or "raw." Choose baked of grilled if you're weighing it after you cooked it. And choose raw if you wanna weigh it before you cook it :)
Edited by EmilyOfTheSun On October 1, 2012 1:22 PM
  17431946
October 1, 2012 1:30 PM
QUOTE:

I weigh all of my food like I'm supposed to. What I just want cleared up for me is do I weigh it before it's cooked or after? Because I can weigh my chicken and it's 10 ounces before I cook it and 7 after.


The answer is...yes.

(As has been pointed out by others, it depends. Fortunately, some of the foods in the database specify.)
  8625464
October 2, 2012 8:00 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

really, it depends on which food item you choose in the database. You just have to match them. I usually weigh my food cooked, so I make sure the database item I choose says "cooked"


But what if you cooked your meat medium and the entry in the database is for rare meat? Then your cooked meat will weigh less because you've cooked away more of the water and juices so you'll be entering fewer calories than you're actually consuming.


For one, I think you have you use your best judgement while estimating. If you eat your food bleu or rare, choose raw no matter what. I enter in raw tuna when I eat seared tuna, for example. If you eat your food medium to well done, then you are cooking some of the water and fat out of it and the calories per unit mass changes. However, this only applies to relatively fatty meats that you would eat less than well done, in which case the calories will be somewhere in between. For things like most fish and chicken and even lean cuts of beef (filet, maybe a good quality sirloin), the difference is pretty negligible as long as you are choosing the correct database item.

QUOTE:

When you go to a restaurant and order a 6oz filet, a 12oz rib-eye, a 1/4lb burger, or a 4oz chicken breast, those aren't weights based on what is on your plate and brought to the table, it's the weight based on what went on the heat in the kitchen. And that's the same way it should be in your kitchen at home.


I agree... but I don't know about you, but I don't carry my food scale into a restaurant. So again, you have to use your estimating judgement again to estimate how much food is there. The thing is... even if the menu says that steak is 8 oz, the kitchen didn't weigh it and it is probably somewhere between 6-10 oz. Again, you have to use our brain some.
  11058666
October 2, 2012 8:21 AM
For the most part I'm using my phone to scan the packaging, or taking the info right of the packaging, and matching it up with what's on MFP, and the info on the packaging is for raw uncooked food, unless other wise stated so I always measure before, so the people who are measuring it after are probably taking in more calories than they think. Another good thing about weighing before is that if find something in the database, and it was for cooked food, but you didn't know it, and used it anyway, you just saved yourself some extra calories without even knowing it. I would rather think I was eating more than I actually was not less than I actually am.
  19249172
October 2, 2012 8:32 AM
I'm one of those odd people who weigh before and after... Of course I am normally adding spices and things to it when I am cooking it thus I weigh everything going into the 'recipe' then I cook it and then I weigh it after again and base my portions (calories) off of that. I figure all the calories that went into it didn't just evaporate..they are still all there somewhere.

When I cook pasta I weigh dry, then I cook it and weigh it again so I know how much I got from the dry stuff and since I don't eat plain pasta I have to account for the other things that are added too. Complicated yes but I have slight OCD about this stuff LOL
  26632427
October 2, 2012 8:36 AM
QUOTE:

I know I am. Darn. huh grumble


yeah, i'm confused too! if i weigh take-out it's going to be after it's cooked since i'm not doing the cooking. i usually look for something similar on the database, but i don't think it always states whether the weight is before or after being cooked. for example i had a salmon burger last night that i got from a take out place. i weighed it on my scale and looked for something on the database with a weight shown and then ratioed the portion that i input to be correct based on the cooked weight. if it had to be on raw weight, then i'd have no idea what to input.
October 2, 2012 8:48 AM
why not weigh it cooked thats how your eating it, and like others say, make sure it says cooked in the database.happy
October 2, 2012 8:58 AM
QUOTE:

why not weigh it cooked thats how your eating it, and like others say, make sure it says cooked in the database.happy


but even if it says cooked, does that necessarily mean that the weight provided is after it's cooked? it seems a little vague. i know the calories and other nutritional information is after being cooked, but the weight is vague.
October 2, 2012 9:01 AM
Since I am weighing what I am eating, I weigh is the state I am going to eat it.

Just be sure when you log it specifies, as others have mentioned.
  28965764
October 2, 2012 10:54 AM
I think you all are over-thinking this...

In the grand scheme of things, this is minor with the exception of a few food items.
  11058666

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