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TOPIC: Net Calories?

 
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September 23, 2012 9:41 AM
Should they be high or low?
I don't really understand what they mean.
Help me, please!
September 23, 2012 9:48 AM
Same thing I'm trying to figure out! Accordingly someone told me it's suppose to be high. I don't really get the whole thing. It's like whatever you intake minus exercise equals net. At the end of the day mines is always low. I don't know wish I could understand it fully too. I feel really dumb not knowing whats it about but oh wells.
September 23, 2012 9:51 AM
I wonder myself..and everyone says something different so it's hard to know what is true:/
  5621053
September 23, 2012 9:54 AM
If you burned 2000 calories today, and you ate 2500 calories, you "net" 500 MORE calories than you are burning. If you did that every day for a week, you would (theoretically) have gained a pound (3500 calories). So if you are trying to lose weight, you want the net to be negative... If you burned 2000 calories today and you ate 1500, you net -500 calories. Do that every day for a week, and you should have lost a pound.

Most people dont burn the same number of calories per day, and dont eat the same number per day. So on a daily basis, if you average -500 net calories, you should be losing a pound a week roughly.

Its ok to look at the daily number, but it means more I think if you look at the weekly totals. If you burned 2000 calories every day for 7 days, you burned 14000 calories. If you ate 1500 calories on 3 days, 2000 on one day, and 2500 on the other three days, you would have eaten 14000 calories... you net 0 for the week and your weight will stay constant, even though some days you ate much less than others. It means that if you "mess up" one day, you can still make up for it at a weekly level. It helps take some pressure off the day to day, and it helps you not kick yourself hard if you happen to have a rough day.

MFP only displays calories burned OVER your base rate. So look into your goal settings for your base rate. If you add that to the exercise calories, you get what I described above.

In the goal settings, it tells you your "goal" net calories based on what you are trying to accomplish... So that is your judgement number you are trying to hit. It already has your 500 calorie deficit built in (if that is what you were attempting), so that is just the number you want your net to match.
Edited by aylajane On September 23, 2012 10:01 AM
  10592394
September 23, 2012 10:00 AM
Your net calories should fall somewhere in between your BMR and TDEE.

Your BMR, or basal metabolic rate, is the number of calories your body needs to keep its vital functions going. It's the amount of calories you'd use every day if, say, you were in a coma.

Your TDEE, or total daily energy expenditure, is the total amount of calories you burn every day. You're not in a coma, of course; you move around quite a bit throughout the day, and that requires more energy. If you ate at your TDEE, you would neither lose nor gain weight; your energy intake would match your energy output.

To lose weight, you want your net intake calories to be more than your BMR, but less than your TDEE. For example, my BMR is about 1280, but my TDEE is usually around 1700 (and higher if I exercise). I net about 1400-1500 calories each day. It's a small deficit, sure, but it adds up over time; and as a bonus, I never feel hungry or deprived.
(For the record, I'm pretty short and spend too much time sitting at a desk. Most people's BMR and TDEE are higher than mine.)

Check out this link for more information: http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/654536-in-place-of-a-road-map-2-0-revised-7-2-12

Hope this helped!
Edited by theoriginaljayne On September 23, 2012 10:02 AM
September 23, 2012 10:01 AM
You need to know your BMR (the calories you burn when resting). So for example, if your BMR is 1500, and you eat 1500 and stay all day sleeping, you wouldn't gain, but stay the same. Since this is probably something you never do, if you eat 1500 per day, you would lose weight.

Now, the net is what @aylajane explained, but you need to eat those calories you've burned. It's healthier if they are not negative.
It's like a treat, if you do excercise, that day you can eat more.
Edited by bloodynails On September 23, 2012 10:01 AM
September 23, 2012 10:02 AM
For the Myfitnesspal system, you want to eat until your Net is "0".

Read these:

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/23912-links-in-mfp-you-want-to-read-again-and-again


Just eat to zero. Not under, not over. Zero.
  5978
September 23, 2012 10:03 AM
personally I wouldn't log the exercise because MFP from what Ive used and heard others say some of the numbers aren't accurate.

I know that in a 24 hr period I burn about 2500-2800 generally on work days and exercise days. I have bodymedia and it figures out how many steps I take ,how many calories I burn while exercsing and sleeping and just everyday things.

I non work days or no exercise days I don't burn more like 2000-2400.

I eat about 1200-1600 cals. Some days I may not eat even 1200. Depends on how sleepy/tired I am or what I am doing that day.

Sometimes I don't get enough water it.

With all this said. It looks as though I should be dropping 2 pounds a week ,right ? but I generally loose inches first and faster then pounds.

As long as their is a 500 cal deficit daily or 3500 cal deficit a week.
  5822866
September 23, 2012 10:04 AM
QUOTE:

If you burned 2000 calories today, and you ate 2500 calories, you "net" 500 MORE calories than you are burning. If you did that every day for a week, you would (theoretically) have gained a pound (3500 calories). So if you are trying to lose weight, you want the net to be negative... If you burned 2000 calories today and you ate 1500, you net -500 calories. Do that every day for a week, and you should have lost a pound.

Most people dont burn the same number of calories per day, and dont eat the same number per day. So on a daily basis, if you average -500 net calories, you should be losing a pound a week roughly.



No, you NEVER want to have negative NET calories...BMR is your Base Metabolic Rate meaning that it is the LOWEST amount that you need to eat in order to fuel your body while just lying in bed all day....You want your NET calories to be at the very LEAST the same as your BMR....Take a look at this link to tell you more detail:

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/654536-in-place-of-a-road-map-2-0-revised-7-2-12

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/groups/home/3817-eat-more-to-weigh-less

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/23912-links-in-mfp-you-want-to-read-again-and-again

ETA: It's confusing b/c you are going to get many different answers to this one but the above links are a great place to start and had been what many people on here are going by...

Hope this helps!!
Edited by autumnk921 On September 23, 2012 10:09 AM
  16043484
September 23, 2012 10:19 AM
Your energy availability, or net as they call it here, should be calculated based on your fat mass and how much weight loss your body can realistically experience per week. As a rule, the less body fat one has, the smaller the deficit should be resulting in a higher net calorie amount. For example, if a person has a goal to drop 25 lbs, then their weight loss goal weekly should be no higher than 1 lb per week. Although it is not entirely accurate for all persons due to total body weight, the approximate 3500 calories is the rough estimate of 1 lb. Thus, a 500 calorie total deficit each day would lead to that 1 lb weight loss per week. Someone with 100 lbs of weight to lose can aim for a weekly weight loss goal of 2 lbs (or more) which would double the deficit to 1000 calories. Naturally, this person will have to reduce the deficit as their fat mass decreases.

The deficit is the sum of less calories below TDEE eaten and increased exercise calories. Thus, your deficit is comprised of those two variables. For the example above, you can partition a 500 calorie deficit by eating 350 calories under actual TDEE and engage in 150 calories of total exercise. By these figures, a person with a TDEE of 2000 calories would eat 1650 calories and exercise a total of 150 calories to establish the 500 calorie deficit. The net would be 1500 calories.
Edited by geekyjock76 On September 23, 2012 10:20 AM
  17993426
September 23, 2012 10:32 AM
bump - thanks for the info
  23422655
September 23, 2012 10:37 AM
QUOTE:
BMR is your Base Metabolic Rate meaning that it is the LOWEST amount that you need to eat in order to fuel your body while just lying in bed all day
nope, it's the amount of calories that will be used to fuel your body, whether those calories come from what you eat or the hundreds of thousands in your fat reserves.

If you had to eat to fuel your body you wouldn't be able to sleep, as the 60 calories you use at 4am wouldn't be available, so we've evolved to have fat stores. That's why it takes a hunger striker some months to die, rather than a few hours or a day or two.
  18022302
September 23, 2012 3:03 PM
QUOTE:

For the Myfitnesspal system, you want to eat until your Net is "0".

Read these:

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/23912-links-in-mfp-you-want-to-read-again-and-again


Just eat to zero. Not under, not over. Zero.


I keep thinking I understand this, but then trying to explain is hard, and then I read something like this...

On my home page right now, it says Goal=1640... Food=1421 (that is truly what I ate so far today), Exercise=-657 (I went on a hike this morning... I am writing this at 5pm, so I know I did not only burn that much the whole day - it is truly only that above and beyond my base rate showing in my goals tab)... and my "net" is currently 1421-657 = 764...

There is NO WAY i can "eat until my net is 0" on the MFP system! Since it only counts in the exercise number the amount ABOVE my TDEE (which is also 1640 - I dont like it calculating the deficit for me), I would have to stop eating at 657 calories until I somehow burn another 800 calories and eat nothing else today...

Am I missing something? I am trying to match the number given for "goal" with the number showing for "net" right?
Edited by aylajane On September 23, 2012 3:05 PM
  10592394
September 23, 2012 3:13 PM
I don't know what all these long explanations are trying to get to. It may have something to do with BMR or even the FAA for that matter, but none of that matters for understanding "net.' Here it is: READ "NET" on MFP as NET NUMBER OF CALORIES EATEN!

MFP gives you a certain number of allowed calories per day, say 2000. If you eat 1000, then exercise off 500 of them, MFP says your "net" is 500--in other words, your net number of calories eaten is 500. You actually ate 1000, but then you worked off 500, so only 500 are left to be applied to your total. After you ate the 1000, you only had 1000 left for the day, but now that you worked off 500 (making you "net 500"), MFP says you have 1500 left for the day!

SIDENOTE: I try to stay under my daily initial limit, and don't eat the calories it allows me to eat once I worked them off. Personal choice.
September 23, 2012 3:19 PM
Ok there is no way you should eat untill your net is 0.. that is just unhealthy..

So the basic principle of weight less is eat less than your body uses. So your body without any exercises and just from day to day activities uses about 2000 - 2400 calories (can be greater or lesser based on your weight). This number is your BMR calculated by your weight and height. Now for an effective weight loss you must eat around 500 - 1000 calories less than the goal so in effect about 1600 calories.

Hope you understand till now.

Now to add exercises. MFP gave you a goal of about 1600. If you exercised and expelled about lets say 500 calories for a particular day. You add this to your "goal calories". So its 1600 PLUS 500 equals 2100 calories. These are the calories available for you to eat for an effective weight loss. So in effect your NET should equal your GOAL.

This is how MFP calculates the above.
The calories you've eaten - The calories you've burnt during exercise = NET.
Your NET should equal your goal and you will have effective weight loss.

Hope I made it a bit more clear
September 23, 2012 3:33 PM
QUOTE:
Am I missing something? I am trying to match the number given for "goal" with the number showing for "net" right?
On your food page, it has Your Daily Goal and Totals. Your total amount of calories eaten should match the goal number.
  17993426
September 23, 2012 3:47 PM
QUOTE:

On your food page, it has Your Daily Goal and Totals. Your total amount of calories eaten should match the goal number.


But only if you are not "eating your exercise calories" right? if you want to do that, your net should equal your goal...
  10592394
September 23, 2012 3:47 PM
Ok, so say your daily calorie goal is 1,500.

Think of your body as a bank account. At the start of each day, your bank account is completely empty, with a balance of $0.00. By the end of the day, you need to be exactly $1,500 dollars in credit. No more, no less.

So if you deposit $2,000, you need to withdraw at least $500 by the end of the day, so that you end up with $1,500.

If you only deposit $1,500 one day, you needn't withdraw any.

If another day, you withdraw $1,000 at the start of one day, then your balance will be -$1,000; so you'll need to deposit $2,500 to make your balance at the end of the day reach $1,500.

Your body works the same way.

If you eat 2,000 calories in one day, you need to burn at least 500 calories off with exercise, so that your net at the end of the day is 1,500.

Alternatively, one day you could eat 1,500, but not burn any off, and your net would still be 1,500 for the day.

Or, if you go crazy one day and burn off 1,000 calories with exercise, you need to eat 2,500 calories that day to bring your net back up to 1,500.

It's simple maths.

Calories in MINUS calories out EQUALS net calories.

2,000 calories eaten MINUS 500 calories burned EQUALS 1,500 net calories.

Your NET CALORIES should match the daily goal that My Fitness Pal gives you.
Edited by fizzletto On September 23, 2012 3:52 PM
  13916113
September 23, 2012 3:55 PM
people are probably confusing the OP beyond belief.

MFP sets your daily NET target based on your weight loss goal. You eat to a consistent net daily--that number doesn't change.

So if your net is 1500 and you exercised to burn 500 calories then you eat 2000. If you don't exercise at all you'd eat 1500.

Think of NET as your "base intake" and any additional calories you burn are added to that number. So you eat more on days you burn more. That makes sense right? Your car needs more gas when you take longer trips, right? Same concept.
September 23, 2012 7:07 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

For the Myfitnesspal system, you want to eat until your Net is "0".

Read these:

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/23912-links-in-mfp-you-want-to-read-again-and-again


Just eat to zero. Not under, not over. Zero.


I keep thinking I understand this, but then trying to explain is hard, and then I read something like this...

On my home page right now, it says Goal=1640... Food=1421 (that is truly what I ate so far today), Exercise=-657 (I went on a hike this morning... I am writing this at 5pm, so I know I did not only burn that much the whole day - it is truly only that above and beyond my base rate showing in my goals tab)... and my "net" is currently 1421-657 = 764...

There is NO WAY i can "eat until my net is 0" on the MFP system! Since it only counts in the exercise number the amount ABOVE my TDEE (which is also 1640 - I dont like it calculating the deficit for me), I would have to stop eating at 657 calories until I somehow burn another 800 calories and eat nothing else today...

Am I missing something? I am trying to match the number given for "goal" with the number showing for "net" right?


Okay, I was talking about the bottom of the math equation on the bottom line of your Food Diary. Not the "Net" calories shown in the very misleading "NET" on your Home page. I think a lot of the confusion here is around that.

Eat until you get to "0" at the bottom of your Food Diary if you are using the Myfitnesspal system.

Since you have stated that you want to eat to your TDEE? ....if your TDEE is 1640, then eat that everyday and don't add in your exercise calories...but if you are asking Myfitnesspal to calculate FOR you to help you lose weight, then it will calculate a deficit somewhere below your TDEE. IF your TDEE is 1640, it will subtract an amount in order to create a deficit so you will lose weight.

If you don't want to add in your exercise calories, don't. Eat at just a little below your TDEE every day. Don't track your exercise here. You're making this way. too. complicated. Keep it Simples.
  5978
September 23, 2012 7:11 PM
So to be clear as mud:

If you want to eat 1640, your NET on the Home Page should be 1640.

If you don't want to be given more calories to eat to offset your exercise, do not enter your exercise here. Just eat 1640 on the bottom of your Food Diary or on the Home Page and also let the Net say 1640.
  5978
September 23, 2012 7:49 PM
Well, here's how I do it, and it is what has made it simple for me.

I think of that number (daily goal) that I start off wth every morning (in my case 1200 calories) as cash in my wallet, and I cannot spend what I do not have.

That gives me 1200 to spend on food each day. By working (exercizing), I earn more cash (calories), and therefore, have more to spend on even more food (calories).

If I planned well, and logged everything, at the end of the day, I will have spent nearly all my cash,leaving me with zero or close to zero in my wallet.

Okay, I admit I might even spend up to 100 calories beyond the 1200 allowed, which leaves me with -100 (in red) at the end of the day. Not that big a deal, so long as I don't make it a habit.

Next day, just start over, fresh, with that wallet full of cash (calories) to spend on food.

Does this help?

I gave mfp all my stats, and chose my goals, and then just let mfp set me up accordingly. I find all those other details distracting, so I just focus on that daily goal/cash and try to make healthy choices most of the time (but not all of the time, I need my ice cream).
  5183214

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