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TOPIC: squats and calculating calories burned

 
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January 3, 2010 8:49 AM
Hi I am planning to do some squats among other things using an excercise ball/stability ball, but when I was logging it in to get an idea of how many calories it would burn, it doesn't say. Surely it burns calories. Is it just one of those things you do just for the added bonus and just count calories that get burned when on my treadmill?huh
January 3, 2010 8:57 AM
Found this online:

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/CalorieBurnChart.htm

Looks like squats burn .096 calories per pound of body weight per minute.

So a 200 lbs. person doing squats for 30 minutes would burn 576 calories.

Hope that helps!
January 3, 2010 9:01 AM
Thanks alot! I probably won't be doing that many laugh , I have never done one in my life. Now(No) time like the present to get started though
Edited by donna56 On January 3, 2010 9:11 AM
January 3, 2010 9:05 AM
I don't think I would be able to stand up if I did squats non stop for 30 minutescry
January 3, 2010 9:05 AM
Basically, yes.

The more you get away from steady-state aerobic exercise, the more difficult it is to come up with calculated intensities that can be generally applied to the population.

Example: Walking on a treadmill at 3 mph is a simple, steady-state activity. The energy cost of that activity has been studied in detail, so coming up with a formula to calculate calories burned while walking 3 mph that can be applied to most of the population is pretty straightforward. There is not a lot of variability from person to person.

Not so with exercises like squats, circuit training, many aerobic classes, etc. There is too much variability, both in the population and with energy systems used, to come up with a formula or table that is applicable to everyone. (There are calculations that do exist, but there is still a lot of inter-person variability).

The issue is becoming more relevant with the growing trend of hybrid, multi-movement, multi-plane exercise routines such as P90X, circuit training, tabata, etc. Because much of the weight-loss benefit of these types of programs occurs during the post-exercise recovery phase and comes from changes in body composition, it is difficult if not impossible to quantify the direct effect. The heart rate monitor market has boomed partly because people are using them to try to quantify this effort, but there are problems with this as well.

If you are just doing some "add-on" strength exercises, it's probably best to just not count them as "calories" --let it just be a "bonus".
January 3, 2010 9:29 AM
Do a lot of cardio and NO SUGARS!!!!!!!! Works for me.
May 21, 2011 6:47 PM
This is exactly what I needed to know. Thank you for the posts
August 15, 2013 8:49 AM
thanks I put this in systemflowerforyou
August 15, 2013 8:59 AM
QUOTE:

Do a lot of cardio and NO SUGARS!!!!!!!! Works for me.


That makes no sense. I would say the opposite. If you do a lot of cardio, then your sugars will easily burn off. The less cardio, the less sugar you will want to eat.
  25631519
August 15, 2013 9:03 AM
QUOTE:

If you are just doing some "add-on" strength exercises, it's probably best to just not count them as "calories" --let it just be a "bonus".


Just wanted to reiterate this point....
August 15, 2013 12:06 PM
QUOTE:

Found this online:

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/CalorieBurnChart.htm

Looks like squats burn .096 calories per pound of body weight per minute.

So a 200 lbs. person doing squats for 30 minutes would burn 576 calories.

Hope that helps!


Only if they set themselves on fire first.
September 25, 2013 12:33 AM
True. You can get a rough estimate simply by wearing a pulse-belt and log the duration and pulse, since your heart-rate correspond pretty well with the intensity of any given exercise though.

Two different exercices that cause your pulse to stay at the same level for the same duration, are pretty likely to burn aproximately the same amount of calories.
September 25, 2013 12:40 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

If you are just doing some "add-on" strength exercises, it's probably best to just not count them as "calories" --let it just be a "bonus".


Just wanted to reiterate this point....


drinker
September 25, 2013 12:45 AM
QUOTE:

Do a lot of cardio and NO SUGARS!!!!!!!! Works for me.


If u cant give legit advice rather don't say anything
December 22, 2013 9:34 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Do a lot of cardio and NO SUGARS!!!!!!!! Works for me.


If u cant give legit advice rather don't say anything


Cardio + no HFCS is a good place to start.
December 22, 2013 9:48 PM
QUOTE:

True. You can get a rough estimate simply by wearing a pulse-belt and log the duration and pulse, since your heart-rate correspond pretty well with the intensity of any given exercise though.

Two different exercices that cause your pulse to stay at the same level for the same duration, are pretty likely to burn aproximately the same amount of calories.

Completely false. Heart rate actually has very little, if any correlation with calorie burn.
December 22, 2013 9:50 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Do a lot of cardio and NO SUGARS!!!!!!!! Works for me.


If u cant give legit advice rather don't say anything


Cardio + no HFCS is a good place to start.


Solid first post.

Also...thread was started in 2010....
  18358448
December 23, 2013 12:08 AM
I usually don't log strength training, just cardio.
  40725671
December 23, 2013 3:39 AM
I log strength training with the mfp calculations, but I don't really stress over the number of calories burned. From what I have learned, the real benefit is from the increased calorie burn afterwards from building muscle.
  45786369
December 23, 2013 7:01 AM
If you are doing squats for the calorie burn, you're doing it wrong. smokin
  25631519
December 23, 2013 7:02 AM
.
Edited by WendyTerry420 On December 23, 2013 7:02 AM
  25631519

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