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TOPIC: Carbs,Fat,Protein

 
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October 29, 2009 7:03 PM
I was wondering in what percentage I should be doing the fat, carbs and protein if i want to loose the weight. Is the protein should be 50% fat 20% and carbs 30%? What everybody else are doing?
October 29, 2009 7:06 PM
That's very high for protein, most people would have it the other way, about 50% carbs, and 30% protein (or even less). Not that it would cause a problem, I doubt it would, it's just an expensive way to eat every day. generally, per gram protein is more expensive and once you get past the threshold of how much your body needs, it is essentially the same thing as complex carbohydrates (glucose).
October 29, 2009 7:09 PM
Hey there, thanks for an answer. I feel like if i'll be eating 50% carbs then i won't lose anything, it seems that carbs make my body just stay the same way. I was thinking maybe by increasing protein it'll be good.
I noticed that i only lose when i cut the carbs.... Gosh big struggle. I tried doing weight watchers this week it just doesn't work
October 29, 2009 7:12 PM
I used to do Apex a while ago, they had me at 53.5 Carbs, 23.64 fat protein was 24.28
October 29, 2009 7:18 PM
i did 50% protein, 30% carbs, and 20% fats. I lost about 50lbs in 13 weeks on that formula. Whatever works for you is what works i guess, but I believe in a higher protein diet. I think it is easier to stick with and you feel more sated. Protein can be inexpensive also, chicken, tuna, and wheysmile
October 29, 2009 7:20 PM
Right, that's how i feel it's easier just to know you can't have 55% of carbs then maybe i'll lose more i don't know
October 29, 2009 7:30 PM
I started here August 17, doing 50 carbs, 25 protein, and 25 fat. I've lost 12 pounds doing that, and I'm very happy with those results.
  261869
October 29, 2009 7:51 PM
I eat 50%carbs 25-30% protein and 25% fat. Since September I have lost 11 pounds.
October 29, 2009 9:12 PM
I have had great success with 50% carbs, 33% protein and 17% fat. Try and make sure the carbs are complex rather than simple and fat is heart healthy...no trans, saturated and hydrogenated fats.
October 29, 2009 9:31 PM
what does MFP has us set at if we dont change it ?
  121844
October 29, 2009 9:46 PM
The recommendations I've seen are 55-65 g of protein a day for a menstruating women.

If you are dieting, though, you might want to get more to help preserve your lean muscle tissue. Also, protein is a nice steady fuel that lasts a long time. I find that I am less hungry when I have a protein-based snack over a carb-based snack.

I currently do the South Beach ratios of 30/30/40 - 30 % protein, 30 % fat and 40 % carbs.
  159717
October 29, 2009 11:04 PM
I'm participating in a "biggest loser" competition at my gym. (grand prize is $1000!!) He has me doing 40-carbs, 40-protein, 20-fat. I've lost 15lbs in 6 weeks (but I also exercise often.) I really like this combination because I feel satisfied throughout the day and I also have enough energy to get through the exercise.....BUT, I do feel like if I wasn't working out as much as I am that I might not be as successful. It goes to show that working out and eating right go hand in hand.
  276121
October 30, 2009 5:49 AM
After all my research, and all the studies, and understanding what protein does in the body, I just don't believe a very high protein level does anything dynamic. What it DOES do is change your body chemistry, which may help you lose weight for a little while (maybe up to about 6 months), but for it to be permanent, you need to continue to eat that way while still making sure you aren't deficient in other areas. For instance, the Mediterranean diet is considered, by a majority of studies and experts, to be the most effective long term diet to not only help lose weight, but maintain a healthy dietary intake (vitamins, minerals, macro nutrients) permanently.


PLEASE NOTE: people who eat high protein diets have a higher (this is documented, I forget where, but I can look it up if need be, but it's easily googlable.)percentage of vitamin deficiency. Please take care to have blood tests taken every few months if you do a high protein, low carb diet. These types of problems don't manifest immediately and can lead to issues later in life. That's my biggest issue. As I said, I don't see any reason high protein is bad for you, as long as you are smart about it, talk to a dietitian, talk to a doctor, and make sure you have enough vitamins and other minerals coming in as well (and I don't mean supplements, supplements have their own downfalls).

Nobody's bashing proteins, but I like to step back and look at it logically. If your diet is healthy, and you're not losing weight on it, short of an allergy to certain carbohydrates (that is medically possible by the way, you can test for it), then most likely it isn't the ratio of carbs/fats/proteins, more probably it's your assumptions (I.E. what your TDEE is, how many calories you burn during exercise, how many calories are in the food you eat...etc.).

And, yes, chicken, tuna, and whey are relatively cheap for meat, but ounce for ounce chicken is still 2X as expensive as whole grain rice, beans, and even more so than whole wheat pasta. Tuna is even more expensive, I don't know what the cost of whey is because I don't use it. But what I can tell you is, protein without any carbs is very difficult to keep up long term. Not that it can't be done, or that it isn't healthy if you do it right, but it's not the only way.

Lets be realistic people, ANY diet that has relatively healthy foods (of any of the macro nutrient types) will allow you to lose weight if you eat at a calorie deficit and do even a modicum of exercise. But the assumption is that you are correctly gauging your TDEE. If you start out with the wrong numbers, no matter what your ratios, you will fail! And yes, I know there are some of you out there that have done it on high protein, this isn't knocking that, just saying it's not the only way.
October 30, 2009 11:41 AM
QUOTE:

But the assumption is that you are correctly gauging your TDEE. If you start out with the wrong numbers, no matter what your ratios, you will fail!


I think this bares repeating.

I get very frustrated when people report that they aren't losing any weight in the forums and the immediate response is "you aren't eating enough" even when they report they are eating as much as 1800 calories a day and are only doing moderate exercise. It's been documented over and over that people overestimate their exercise and underestimate their food intake. Therefore, the most likely explanation, if you aren't losing weight over a reasonable period of time and you are eating a reasonable number of calories and not practicing exercise anorexia (i.e., you are a typical dieter) is that you are eating too much for what you expend.

I would also like to point out that high and low are relative terms. At my calorie expendature, I'm eating and average of 175 g of carbs a day. That is not a low amount in my book. It's lower than average, but it's not the 20-60 g that many low carb diets put you on in the weight loss phase.
Edited by MacMadame On October 30, 2009 11:41 AM
  159717
October 30, 2009 12:53 PM
keeping this to read later!
  188913
February 24, 2010 5:27 PM
QUOTE:

That's very high for protein, most people would have it the other way, about 50% carbs, and 30% protein (or even less). Not that it would cause a problem, I doubt it would, it's just an expensive way to eat every day. generally, per gram protein is more expensive and once you get past the threshold of how much your body needs, it is essentially the same thing as complex carbohydrates (glucose).


Thanks for this info.
  188913

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