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TOPIC: Why does weight loss slow down when lifting?

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August 2, 2012 8:45 AM
I've read that building muscle is impossible on a calorie deficit (for the average person). So why is it that my weight loss has slowed down since I started lifting? I was losing on average 2lb per week, but the last 2 weeks I've lost 2lbs in total. Is this normal? I'm not losing weight to a deadline that is unacheivable, I've lost 47lbs since February and I want to lose the rest of my weight (41lbs) by next summer. I just want to make sure I'm doing it right!
  18823682
August 2, 2012 8:47 AM
Muscle weighs more than fat
August 2, 2012 8:49 AM
How do you figure muscle weighs more than fat? Muscle is denser, and more compact, but a lb is a lb.
August 2, 2012 8:49 AM
Muscle does not weigh more than fat. A pound is a pound. However, muscle is denser than fat, so you can seem smaller, but weigh more than someone who has more body fat than you. Muscle takes up less space than fat. I recommend taking your measurements, like your neck, waist, hips, etc, and also track your progress that way.
August 2, 2012 8:50 AM
QUOTE:

Muscle weighs more than fat


^^^^This. I also wouldn't pay attention to the scale. Use body fat as a guide and how your clothes fit. Much more accurate picture IMO.
August 2, 2012 8:50 AM
QUOTE:

How do you figure muscle weighs more than fat? Muscle is denser, and more compact, but a lb is a lb.

Lol, thank you! I've been telling people this all day!
August 2, 2012 8:50 AM
Not to worry, you're doing great
  13866738
August 2, 2012 8:51 AM
QUOTE:

How do you figure muscle weighs more than fat? Muscle is denser, and more compact, but a lb is a lb.


True. Perhaps you are just building muscle while losing the fat? Do your clothes feel different? Do you have more stamina? Don't just go by the scale, take measurements and observe what you are wearing.

Either way congratulations on the loss!
  15031031
August 2, 2012 8:51 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Muscle weighs more than fat


^^^^This. I also wouldn't pay attention to the scale. Use body fat as a guide and how your clothes fit. Much more accurate picture IMO.





This
August 2, 2012 8:51 AM
Are you running or other cardio ? Weight lifting is supposed to speed up your metabolism, but if you are doing lifting in place of cardio, that might explain it!!
August 2, 2012 8:52 AM
a pound is a pound. Muscle weighs the same as fat, it just takes up less space.

BUT when strength training, your muscles retain a lot of water, which could make it look like your weight loss is slowing.
  9604811
August 2, 2012 8:53 AM
Weight lifting makes your muscles hold onto extra water to help repair themselves.
  5515587
August 2, 2012 8:53 AM
You may not be adding muscle when you are strength training, but when you work your muscles they tend to retain water - which affects your weight.

I'm not an expert, but there are a number of great articles focusing on it. STOP looking at the scale, and take measurements. It is more accurate.

Besides, you still lost a pound. Be proud of yourself!
  3564309
August 2, 2012 8:53 AM
pound is a pound

the body will retain some water but it will come off don`t pannic :)
  9253539
August 2, 2012 8:53 AM
Let the mirror, Tape measure be your scale. Once you start lifting, in my opinion, Your mindset needs to change from weight loss to body composition.
  5288645
August 2, 2012 8:54 AM
1 pound loss per week is still very good.

It usually takes several weeks for a woman to gain a pound of muscle. It's not something that happens this quickly. You're likely retaining a bit more water as your body tries to heal the muscle damaged during strength training. This damage is NOT a bad thing. The process is needed for them to grow.
  5078525
August 2, 2012 8:54 AM
You also retain quite a bit of water when lifting because your muscles use it for healing. You won't see large losses while you're lifting, but when you take a break from it and your muscles release that water, you'll see it. And you won't necessarily build muscle on a deficit, but you will maintain it when lifting so you will only be losing fat and not muscle, hopefully. Ditch the scale and go with measurements. Good luck!
August 2, 2012 8:54 AM
Muscle does not weigh more than fat, but if you lose 1lb of fat and gain 1lb of muscle from lifting the scale will show you lost 0lbs. It's that simple. I would measure your waist or trouble areas to see if you are going down in inches, not weight.
  10709668
August 2, 2012 8:54 AM
First off, muscles retain water to help repair when you lift. If you're feeling any soreness or stiffness, that's inflammation and inflammation is fluid retention.

Secondly, as you get closer to your goal, your weight loss will naturally slow. You may not have enough excess body fat to support a two pound a week loss any more... at this point, you're probably better off switching to lose one pound a week.

That's what happened to me. I had it set for two pounds a week, but typically only lost one pound. So I switched to one pound a week, was able to eat a little bit more and felt better, and kept losing one pound a week.

Third, when you're not lifting, you risk losing more muscle mass. Since muscle by volume is heavier, you're going to see a bigger drop on the scale if you're losing muscle AND fat than if you're just losing fat. Keeping muscle is the main goal in lifting, and by doing that, you'll likely reach your goal body before you reach your goal number on the scale.
  3240741
August 2, 2012 8:55 AM
Please don't be worried. At the beginning of the summer I weight 192 pounds, but wasn't lifting much. I was losing weight, but my body was hardly changing. Perhaps it was getting smaller, but not more "athletic."

Now, over two months later I weigh 189, but I am almost 2 sizes smaller. My body has completely changed, and so many more people have noticed. They ask if I have lost weight, but I am only down 3 pounds.

I hate that I weigh 189 pounds, but at the same time..who cares what the scale says if I look and feel better!
August 2, 2012 8:55 AM
Thanks for the info!
  10709668
August 2, 2012 8:55 AM
QUOTE:

Let the mirror, Tape measure be your scale. Once you start lifting, in my opinion, Your mindset needs to change from weight loss to body composition.


what he said
August 2, 2012 8:55 AM
Before lifting if you were doing a lot of cardio, you were probably burning muscle as well as fat. I'm a true believer that you need to have a balance of strength training and cardio. Strength training will help you keep off the weight in the long run as muscle burn more calories when your sedative. I've yo-yo'd up and down with weight loss until I found the proper balance. I can lose weight easily by doing a lot of cardio, but gain it back easily as well. Plus I'd rather weigh a 180lbs and be built like a brick **** house, than be a 150lbs of bones and skin. I don't care what the scale says anymore. I care more about my measurements.
August 2, 2012 8:56 AM
QUOTE:

I've read that building muscle is impossible on a calorie deficit (for the average person). So why is it that my weight loss has slowed down since I started lifting? I was losing on average 2lb per week, but the last 2 weeks I've lost 2lbs in total. Is this normal? I'm not losing weight to a deadline that is unacheivable, I've lost 47lbs since February and I want to lose the rest of my weight (41lbs) by next summer. I just want to make sure I'm doing it right!


2lbs in 2 weeks? That sounds great to me! 1 lb a week is a healthy, recommended loss. I'd start measuring yourself every 2 weeks to a month since your weight lifting. The scale doesn't accurately portray what you've lost.
August 2, 2012 8:56 AM
Same thing happened to me this week. I hit the weights hard and gained 3 pounds. Kind of freaked me out but I know i'm not over eating so i'm just going to keep at it and ignore the scale.
  24012071

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