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TOPIC: Artificial Sweeteners good or bad?

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August 14, 2012 8:16 AM
QUOTE:

Artificial Sweeteners are really bad. Check their chemical composition and you will know why ?

http://www.mercola.com/article/aspartame/hidden_dangers.htm


What I find funny about this article, is that statements made by people are carefully footnoted, but when actual studies or scientific findings are mentioned, there is no reference or identifying information to allow someone to look it up for accuracy.
  20740064
August 14, 2012 1:34 PM
QUOTE:

Artificial Sweeteners are really bad. Check their chemical composition and you will know why ?

http://www.mercola.com/article/aspartame/hidden_dangers.htm
More hoopla with no clinical references to back them. What happened to people actually doing research?

A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 28+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  9285851
August 14, 2012 2:03 PM
QUOTE:

and I would just like to add that for the people on here who keeps griping about "scientific evidence" blah blah blah... please take a look at who pays for the studies. and let's not forgot what tobacco companies did for years. Think about how many years it took us to realizes (or maybe admit) that lead in paint and gasoline was harmful. take a look at who the members of the FDA were at the time aspartame was approved for human consumption, and which companies THEY were affiliated with. The food industry is run like a business with the purpose of PROFIT not the purpose of people's health in mind. Just saying.


Well... If someone's paying for those studies, then we all know that artificial sweeteners is a big market so how can you positively say that the anti-aspartame studies aren't funded by other manufacturers like Splenda vs Nutrasweet? Because you know, people won't stop using artificial sweeteners when aspartame is evil, they will look for other non-calorie alternatives.
August 14, 2012 5:39 PM
QUOTE:

I look at it this way: There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to consume aspartame (or any artificial sweetener). Use sugar and count your calories, or use Stevia and don't look back.

But the products I like don't use Stevia and I like to drink lots of sweet tasting drinks. That's the reason I consume it.

QUOTE:
We used to make buildings with asbestos and paint with lead too.

That argument could be used about anything.
Potatoes, for instance.
  27247880
August 14, 2012 11:36 PM
http://www.mercola.com/article/aspartame/fda.htm

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robbie-gennet/donald-rumsfeld-and-the-s_b_805581.html

Open your eyes. Do your research. Don't take everything at face value.

And as far as sugar causing osteoperosis goes it is true. Eating refined sugar causes a spike in blood sugar followed by a huge drop. When the body senses this drop, the adrenal glands produce cortisol (a hormone related to stress). Cortisol has it's place and time in the body, but constantly manufacturing it causes insulin resistance. basically your body stops being able to use the insulin your pancreas makes, which is used to get glucose into cells. When cells are not susceptible to insulin, the glucose can't get into the cells, and therefore causes a rise in blood sugar (which is what the body is trying to do after sensing the drop in blood sugar). Cortisol inhibits osteoblast (bone cell) production. Need a source for this? Here. http://www.livestrong.com/article/131399-effects-cortisol/
In small amonts refined sugar probably doesn't matter but it's in sooooooo much of food nowadays (also in the form of high fructose corn syrup, etc) of course it's going to have a negative impact.
I don't have a written source for the thing about sugar not being processed as a full molecule. I learned about that from the dcotor who runs part of my facility when I took a continuing education class on nutrition. it's been a year or two since I took the class but I'm sure if I speak with him tomorrow morning he can give me sources. For the record, I just want to say this. i am a nurse. i understand on a cellular level how the body works, breaksdown and processes chemicals, whether they are natural or artificial. I would also like to say that everyone is certainly entitled to do what they want to their body, as long as they are informed about it. Like I said earlier, I doubt we will never know the truth until mass independent studies are conducted on the subject (and you are wrong about peer-review, they have just as many ties), which will probably never happen because funding would have to come from somewhere, be it the manufacturers of aspartame, or a competitor, either way the results are being skewed. Personally, if I am unsure about something or if there is as much conflicting reseach about something as there is about aspartame, I choose to stay away from it ESPECIALLY when there are alternatives that are proven to be better for the body and lower on the glycemic index.
  26363294
August 14, 2012 11:53 PM
You're a nurse, and your using huffpo, livestrong.com and that mercola article that was shot down as your sources.....and then telling us to open our eyes and do our research? Seriously?
  20740064
August 14, 2012 11:54 PM
QUOTE:

http://www.mercola.com/article/aspartame/fda.htm

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robbie-gennet/donald-rumsfeld-and-the-s_b_805581.html

Open your eyes. Do your research. Don't take everything at face value.

And as far as sugar causing osteoperosis goes it is true. Eating refined sugar causes a spike in blood sugar followed by a huge drop. When the body senses this drop, the adrenal glands produce cortisol (a hormone related to stress). Cortisol has it's place and time in the body, but constantly manufacturing it causes insulin resistance. basically your body stops being able to use the insulin your pancreas makes, which is used to get glucose into cells. When cells are not susceptible to insulin, the glucose can't get into the cells, and therefore causes a rise in blood sugar (which is what the body is trying to do after sensing the drop in blood sugar). Cortisol inhibits osteoblast (bone cell) production. Need a source for this? Here. http://www.livestrong.com/article/131399-effects-cortisol/
In small amonts refined sugar probably doesn't matter but it's in sooooooo much of food nowadays (also in the form of high fructose corn syrup, etc) of course it's going to have a negative impact.
I don't have a written source for the thing about sugar not being processed as a full molecule. I learned about that from the dcotor who runs part of my facility when I took a continuing education class on nutrition. it's been a year or two since I took the class but I'm sure if I speak with him tomorrow morning he can give me sources. For the record, I just want to say this. i am a nurse. i understand on a cellular level how the body works, breaksdown and processes chemicals, whether they are natural or artificial. I would also like to say that everyone is certainly entitled to do what they want to their body, as long as they are informed about it. Like I said earlier, I doubt we will never know the truth until mass independent studies are conducted on the subject (and you are wrong about peer-review, they have just as many ties), which will probably never happen because funding would have to come from somewhere, be it the manufacturers of aspartame, or a competitor, either way the results are being skewed. Personally, if I am unsure about something or if there is as much conflicting reseach about something as there is about aspartame, I choose to stay away from it ESPECIALLY when there are alternatives that are proven to be better for the body and lower on the glycemic index.
Articles aren't peer reviewed studies. Link an actual study from say the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism or the Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Anyone can write their "theory" on what happens. Cortisol can be raised through exercise, stress, sleep deprivation, commuting, and severe calorie restriction. These are legitimate causes of the raising of cortisol continually. Haven't read or heard that osteoporosis is linked to sugar intake. So if it's true then there has to be some study that concludes it.

A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
IDEA Fitness member
Kickboxing Certified Instructor
Been in fitness for 28+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
Edited by ninerbuff On August 14, 2012 11:57 PM
  9285851
August 15, 2012 1:46 PM
Put simply in laymen terms watch out for certain web site scare MONGERS.. Most seem to be from extremest's holistic web sites that have no real studies to back up their claims. They try to trick and scare the feeble minded thus in turn having those feeble minded people spread their garbage nonsense claims. Do not believe every thing you read and if some thing does interest you then find and read the real research studies behind it and make your opinions based off of those.
Edited by Shock_Wave On August 15, 2012 1:55 PM
August 15, 2012 4:42 PM
After reading (and weeding out the "scare" sites), I started seeing a common thread. Splenda was brought to market based on mostly rat studies and relatively short term (less than six months) human studies. So in a way, everyone who is consuming it is a guinea pig for its long-term safety. Drugs go through years of phases of trials and testing before they're allowed into the market. I guess I don't understand why a commonly consumed product should be any different. I think this may be why many people who've been using it (even in small quantities) for several years might develop a reaction over time and start looking into it...like myself.

Published article from 2000 re the above studies, though this has never been controversial:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed&cmd=Search&term=Food%20Chem%20Toxicol[Jour]+AND+38%20Suppl%202[Volume]+AND+S123[page]

I found several published articles about single patients and sucralose induced migraines. Here is one:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed&cmd=Search&term=Headache[Jour]+AND+46[Volume]+AND+515[page]

I've also read a few independent articles about weight gain because of not being truly satisfied with the artificial sweeteners and the metabolism of them. No, they're not official.

I get that people want official scientific studies. But sometimes, personal experience is enough. I've been off of it for three full days now. My rash/itchy neck is disappearing. I feel better and less bloated. If it wasn't happening to me, I'm not sure I'd believe it. My problem is that I quit BOTH aspartame and Splenda (and didn't even consume large quantities to begin with) so I'll have to figure out which it was or else nix both. I think if I can go with something natural, why not just do it...for me when I know I'm one who has had a reaction. It's not in my head. I'm not a scare monger. I'm a real person having a real experience and sharing it here. Sometimes real life research and experience is better than journal articles.
August 16, 2012 8:07 AM
Sure, real life research has its place. However, what about the millions of people who consume these sweeteners with no ill effects? Even if I were to go with anecdotal evidence over peer reviewed studies, the vast majority of anecdotal evidence points to artificial sweeteners being perfectly safe.

Most people that claim to have reactions to artificial sweeteners list off the exact same symptoms of any other food allergy. It's not that the artificial sweeteners are unhealthy, some people are just allergic to them. No different than people being allergic to peanuts, strawberries, soy, shellfish, or any other food.
August 16, 2012 8:48 AM
That's true. These people are more sensitive/allergic than others for whatever reason.

I think, regardless of my sensitivity, I'm going to stick with the stance that natural is better than something derived from sugar that has three chlorine atoms as components. It may have turned out to be safe in the short term studies that were done. But chlorine atoms are the part of science of it. It just seems strange to be ingesting it on a daily basis when it's something I can actively control. That's just me.

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