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TOPIC: Insanity Meal Plan

 
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June 13, 2012 1:21 PM
I'm planning to start doing insanity and was curious to see what people eat while on this program!

Here is my plan:
- yogurt
- nuts
- toast
- grilled chicken
- canned tuna
- fish
- eggs
- protein shakes (muscle milk light)
- veggies

Sex: F
Height: 5'5
Net Calories: 1500
Carbs: 130 g
Fat: 60 g
Protein: 130 g
Edited by onikonor On June 13, 2012 1:22 PM
  22767990
June 13, 2012 1:24 PM
I would encourage you to use the nutrition guide that came with the program. They have things really well laid out in there to fuel your body for those workouts.

VBCoach25
  3702482
June 13, 2012 1:26 PM
QUOTE:

I would encourage you to use the nutrition guide that came with the program. They have things really well laid out in there to fuel your body for those workouts.

VBCoach25


For sure, I would like to hear some feedback of what worked for people :) and what did not.
  22767990
June 13, 2012 1:28 PM
The meal plan that comes with the program is really easy to use. I would recommend that. It also comes with a list of easy substitution so you can customize your meals some if you want to.
  21784444
June 13, 2012 1:28 PM
I don't really know anything about insanity, but I just wanted to share with you, and anyone really, that we may have to be careful of tuna right now. Apparently a lot of irradiated tuna is showing up on our west coast now due to the Japanese nuclear disaster last year...
June 13, 2012 1:28 PM
I didn't use any of the nutrition guide. I upped my protein intake, usually drank a recovery drink afterwards if I wasn't eating within 30 minutes, and had a snack about an hour before I worked out. Same thing I do for all my intense workouts.

I still have my cookies, ice cream, cake and other goodies, just in moderation and not all the time. All that worked for me!
June 13, 2012 1:34 PM
I'm doing my own thing as well...it varies from day to day
  9708265
June 13, 2012 1:37 PM
QUOTE:

I didn't use any of the nutrition guide. I upped my protein intake, usually drank a recovery drink afterwards if I wasn't eating within 30 minutes, and had a snack about an hour before I worked out. Same thing I do for all my intense workouts.

I still have my cookies, ice cream, cake and other goodies, just in moderation and not all the time. All that worked for me!


This is exactly what I do! I haven't lost weight and I'm on my fourth week. But holy crap have I tightened up! I wasn't doing Insanity to lose weight, I lost the weight from running. I measured myself when I started and will again next week, I'm thinking I'll be seeing the improvements there rather than the scale.

As far as the foods you've listed, that's a lot of what I eat too. Sounds like you are going on a good plan.

Oh one more thing, I am shocked at how well I recover now that I take protein shakes after my Insanity workouts. I used to do boot camp before Insanity and was ALWAYS sore. Insanity is way more of a workout than boot camp class but the soreness is so much less. I NEVER would have believed that about protein shakes...I'm sold on them now.
Edited by 987Runner On June 13, 2012 1:37 PM
  16330761
June 13, 2012 1:37 PM
Nice. I hope you make Insanity your bltch.
June 13, 2012 1:38 PM
I did my own thing also, just had to add some healthy snacks for when I would get hungry inbetween. I was never a snacker before, but I need the extra fuel.
  8043005
June 13, 2012 1:38 PM
I'm just going to eat what I would normally. My diet works for me to loose weight at the minute, so combining that with the 30 day shred and insanity, I'm sure to see results... At least thats what I'm telling myself.

I will also not eat back my exercise calories, thats counter productive in my opinion :)
  21019610
June 13, 2012 1:38 PM
QUOTE:

Oh one more thing, I am shocked at how well I recover now that I take protein shakes after my Insanity workouts. I used to do boot camp before Insanity and was ALWAYS sore. Insanity is way more of a workout than boot camp class but the soreness is so much less. I NEVER would have believed that about protein shakes...I'm sold on them now.


Great! I will definitely keep that in mind! I already stocked up with muscle milk light from costo hehe. It's very low cals ~100 per shake.
  22767990
June 13, 2012 1:44 PM
I have been doing the p90x workouts for just over a month, 5 weeks to be exact, and I dont follow the diet that came with the plan. I eat carbs at least an hour before I workout and something with alot of protein and some fruit after. I am finding out that it is very hard to stay below my suggested carb intake, so I try to get most of my carbs from fruit and veggies. The nutrition program had me eating alot of calories and it is also difficult to follow if on a tight food budget. So far it is helping even without following the strict nutrition plan
  23280834
June 13, 2012 1:46 PM
A little carb after workouts is a good idea. Otherwise expensive protein will be used as a quick energy source rather than recuperating muscle tissue as intended. If the yogurt were Greek it would be a much better macronutrient balance. Unless the toast is whole grain then it is probably worthless sugar. Fruit is near worthless sugar with some fiber and vitamins. Veggies all the way! Fructose (fruit sugar) doesn't replenish muscle glycogen, so it is not even a good postworkout carb. Still a bit of simple sugars (toast and yogurt!)are good in the morning and postworkout.

Diet is near perfect otherwise. No need to rigidly adhere to a meal plan. You have to eat in a similar fashion forever to maintain your future success.

If you ever want to be able to eat more a tiny bit of heavy (relative) weight lifting works wonders on metabolism.
Edited by fatfuck5000 On June 13, 2012 1:54 PM
June 13, 2012 1:52 PM
I havent done Insanity but I have done P90X. A good pre-workout meal would be something like this about 45 min before you start.
2 teaspoons honey (fast energy)
half a orange or apple (moderately fast energy)
1/2 cup of quiona or 2 slices of whole wheat bread (complex carb to fuel your body through out the workout)

Protein Shakes: Considering your diet already has a number of high protein sources: fish, chicken nuts etc I feel that the protein shake ( assuming one scoop of whey about 24grams of protein) is going to be excessive. A protein shake IS however good if you need a quick protein source and dont have time for a meal or are not hungry enough to eat a solid meal. Protein shakes also add extra unnecessary calories to your diet if you are looking to lose fat (negative net calorie consumption).
It doesnt take much to get to 25 grams of protein needed for proper workout recovery. 4oz of chicken breast is plenty.

Eat more of your carbohydrates prior to your workout. You ll feel much more energized during it. Dont forget to take some in with your recovery meal (post workout meal) just not quiet as much near bed time. If you re feeling fatigued everyday you need to take in more calories and allow yourself more recovery days (perhaps more important than workout days).

Hope this helps.
June 13, 2012 2:04 PM
Muscle Milk Light will not add "unnecessary" calories. It will add 25g of cheap protein, 12g of good simple postworkout carbs, and 6g of very good medium-chain-triglycerides (dietary fat that oxidizes body fat). The shake is fine. Many people are food purist, but there is no good argument against shakes. They are cheap protein sources and fast digesting nutrients. Keep doing what your doing :)

As for preworkout carbs do what feels right within the constraints of your calories and macros. Fruit is of little benefit compared to better carbs, but it taste good and provides calories so do whatever.
Edited by fatfuck5000 On June 13, 2012 2:04 PM
June 13, 2012 4:12 PM
QUOTE:

Muscle Milk Light will not add "unnecessary" calories. It will add 25g of cheap protein, 12g of good simple postworkout carbs, and 6g of very good medium-chain-triglycerides (dietary fat that oxidizes body fat). The shake is fine. Many people are food purist, but there is no good argument against shakes. They are cheap protein sources and fast digesting nutrients. Keep doing what your doing :)

As for preworkout carbs do what feels right within the constraints of your calories and macros. Fruit is of little benefit compared to better carbs, but it taste good and provides calories so do whatever.


What do you mean by cheap protein?

I also agree with reducing fruit intake although not avoiding it altogether. Veggies seem to be a much better choice, although it depends on the vegetable. I love cucumber and cauliflour. Are there any other super veggies low in sugar?

PS planning seems to be the easy part, following without extra snacking is the hard part!
Edited by onikonor On June 13, 2012 4:17 PM
  22767990
June 13, 2012 8:29 PM
As in whey protein can be sourced very inexpensively. At about $6 a lb you will be hard pressed to name anything with more protein for the money. People say whey is expensive. Nonsense! Chicken and beef are expensive. However whey spikes insulin just as much as sugar, so it is best to only use it in the morning after your fast or pre, inter , or post workout.

Count out nuts. It's very easy to eat a couple hundred calories too much.

Kale is much more nutrient dense than broccoli or cauliflower, but you have to like green stuff to eat kale.
If your inclined take a bundle of kale boil it two minutes and then stop cooking it under cold water (blanch it).
Cook in a nonstick pan with a little minced garlic and a bit of oyster sauce (an asian "bbq" sauce that does not taste like oysters)
This is an extremely popular dish in Thailand. One of my favorites. Look at this list:
http://www.glamour.com/health-fitness/blogs/vitamin-g/2010/02/the-top-10-most-nutrient-dense.html

You are smart to choose the most nutrient/fiber dense veggies. They will keep your belly full, have very few net carbs, and will make sure you don't have issues in the bathroom. Low carb diets can be dangerous without fiber, :)
Edited by fatfuck5000 On June 13, 2012 8:32 PM
June 14, 2012 12:01 PM
QUOTE:

As in whey protein can be sourced very inexpensively. At about $6 a lb you will be hard pressed to name anything with more protein for the money. People say whey is expensive. Nonsense! Chicken and beef are expensive. However whey spikes insulin just as much as sugar, so it is best to only use it in the morning after your fast or pre, inter , or post workout.


Oh thanks. I never realized whey protein would spike blood sugar :( How would I identify this from the label?

How much should be max consumption per day to avoid this?

I have protein shakes now and they don't show much sugar content like 10 g per max.
Edited by onikonor On June 14, 2012 12:03 PM
  22767990
June 14, 2012 4:06 PM
It is not that whey spikes glucose, but rather causes an insulin spike. No worries. Insulin spikes are normal parts of your bodies metabolism. A few controlled insulin spikes a day are healthy. During an insulin spike the body looks for sources other than body fat. This makes since. In a primitive context the only thing that would spike insulin was a significant meal, so the body turns from oxidizing body fat and instead hydrolyzes food. Now you can drink a soda, the body says, "Yay food," but there are little nutrients to process.

This goes very in depth, but it is easy to remember that a person trying to burn fat should avoid too many insulin spikes (reaction to fast digesting protein or carbs). In the morning glycogen levels are low, so simple sugar (bread, rice, rolled oats) are good. It is worth the insulin spike to get metabolism rapidly accelerated.

After a workout an insulin spike helps to rapidly deliver nutrients to the muscle warding off catabolism (breaking down fat and muscle when glycogen is depleted) and promoting anabolism (sexy muscle).

Keep it simple. Eat well. Nourish yourself. Workout ****ing hard. Have a drink of protein with carbs (or chicken and rice) immediately after working out.

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