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TOPIC: Cycling - how many calories burned?

 
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June 10, 2012 7:35 AM
I've run a lot...i've biked a lot, however, i've always found inconsistencies in how total calories burned are calculated. I found this article which is really quite good, and can be used as a more accurate model. The examples below show the "average person"....If you've ever wondered why pro cyclists are so thin, use 135lb, 28mph, for 100 miles... (135 x .34) x 100 = 4500 calories. During a "Grand Tour" over three weeks, they will ride at least 100miles daily with a couple of rest days along the way.

Running vs. Biking
Although running is also a great form of aerobic exercise, the calories burned per mile always remains the same. Two things will alter the total calories burned---speed and weight. However, with biking there is wind resistance to add into the mix. Because of this, the faster you bike, the faster you burn not only total calories but calories per mile. Running will also give you a more intense workout, but it's easier to burn calories biking, meaning you won't have to bike as intensely as you run to burn the same number of calories.

Calories Per Mile
Dr. Edward Coyle at the University of Texas in Austin has worked with top athletes studying their oxygen consumption. Here is the calorie consumption he has figured out for for biking: 10 mph -- 0.17 calories/pound; 15 mph -- 0.2 calories/pound; 20 mph -- 0.25 calories/pound; 25 mph -- 0.3 calories/pound; and 30 mph -- 0.38 calories/pound.

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Calculating Calories Per Mile
To figure how many calories you will burn per mile, take your body weight and multiply it by the calorie consumption listed above for the speed at which you bike. For instance, a 140-pound man biking at 20 mph will burn 35 calories per mile (140 pounds x 0.25 calories/pound), and a 160-pound man biking at the same speed will burn 40 calories per mile (160 pounds x 0.25 calories/pound). The heavier you are, the more calories per mile you will burn.

Total Calories
To calculate how many calories you burn during a bike ride, multiply the calorie factor by your weight and miles biked. For example a 150 lb. biker, biking 20 miles at 15 miles per hour will burn 600 calories (150 pounds x 20 miles x 0.2 calories/pound).

Factors That Could Influence the Numbers
Coyle's calculations don't take into wind and hills. Biking into a headwind will be harder than biking in a tailwind. Biking uphill will be harder than biking downhill. Also, drafting behind another rider could cut your energy needs by one-third.



Read more: Calories Burned Biking Per Mile | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5497335_calories-burned-biking-per-mile.html#ixzz1xOtzNoKD
June 10, 2012 3:39 PM
Awesome info! Thanks for posting.
  10643481
June 10, 2012 5:37 PM
Don't forget the weight of the bike, tires, and road surface. I definitely work a LOT harder on rough chipseal than I do on smooth asphalt, even on the same bike.
  4377318
June 10, 2012 6:02 PM
QUOTE:

Don't forget the weight of the bike, tires, and road surface. I definitely work a LOT harder on rough chipseal than I do on smooth asphalt, even on the same bike.


yah...why do you think i got rid of the aluminum frame 19lb bike for a 13.2lb carbon model.... :-)

sidenote....in prep for my first century, i did training rides with a guy on a mountain bike...he had a hard time keeping up with the group, but he was on a mountain bike. For the century ride, he borrowed a road bike.... he finished a good 20mins ahead of me at 4hrs 55min...
June 10, 2012 6:07 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Don't forget the weight of the bike, tires, and road surface. I definitely work a LOT harder on rough chipseal than I do on smooth asphalt, even on the same bike.


yah...why do you think i got rid of the aluminum frame 19lb bike for a 13.2lb carbon model.... :-)

sidenote....in prep for my first century, i did training rides with a guy on a mountain bike...he had a hard time keeping up with the group, but he was on a mountain bike. For the century ride, he borrowed a road bike.... he finished a good 20mins ahead of me at 4hrs 55min...


I totally believe it.

Yep, I survived just a year on my aluminum bike with carbon fork before upgrading to full carbon...it wasn't so much that I wanted a lighter bike (that was a bonus), but we have a lot of chipsealed roads that were really putting a damper on my riding enjoyment and the full carbon really mellows out that heavy vibration. My bike was also a bit more upright than I wanted and I went from having no goal other than some casual riding to wanting to do more competitive stuff. I think I cut about 3#s from my 1st bike to my 2nd. Now I just need to drop a bunch off my butt, heh.
  4377318

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