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TOPIC: MetFormin _ Glucophage Side Effects

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August 7, 2009 7:07 AM
What are the sidse effects with MetFormin _ Glucophage? How do you deal with them?

I took my first pill yesterday and the side effects are awful.sad It really messes with your tummy badly.sick Do they ever go away?

Please help. I have to take it because I am Insulin Resistant and have PCOS which causes the Insulin Resistance.angry

Thanks a million for all your help!!!flowerforyou
  215757
August 7, 2009 7:13 AM
I personally have never taken it, I take the natural approach as you know. However, my friend is a fertility nurse and deals with a lot of patients with PCOS. She said that there is now a new form of Metformin called Glumetza, it's long lasting Metformin and has no side effects. I guess the dose they suggest is 1500 mg/day taken at night in case you do have any side effects (so you sleep through them). I've heard that the side effects of normal Metformin are just terrible, maybe ask your doctor about the Glumetza instead. If your stomach is upset maybe try ginger capsules or peppermint tea to help settle things.
I hope you feel better and figure out something that works for you.
Good luck flowerforyou
  194687
August 7, 2009 7:16 AM
QUOTE:

I personally have never taken it, I take the natural approach as you know. However, my friend is a fertility nurse and deals with a lot of patients with PCOS. She said that there is now a new form of Metformin called Glumetza, it's long lasting Metformin and has no side effects. I guess the dose they suggest is 1500 mg/day taken at night in case you do have any side effects (so you sleep through them). I've heard that the side effects of normal Metformin are just terrible, maybe ask your doctor about the Glumetza instead. If your stomach is upset maybe try ginger capsules or peppermint tea to help settle things.
I hope you feel better and figure out something that works for you.
Good luck flowerforyou


Thank you so much for the info on the new Metformin. Will look it up. My stomach only gets upset when I eat but its more like I eat and run to the bathroom (Sorry if its TMI).blushing

Yesterday afternoon was my first dose so I hope as time progresses that it will get better. I have to do 1 a day for the first 3 days and then 2 a day there after. I just want to get my PCOS under control and lose the weight so that I can feel and look healthy again.

Thanks!smile
  215757
August 7, 2009 7:17 AM
I no longer take Metformin for my PCOS and diabetes. I am controlling with a low carb plan and exercise.

It will take about 3 days to 2 weeks for your body to adjust. Take it with food and the more natural and unprocessed it is, the better off your stomach will be.
August 7, 2009 7:19 AM
Girl, I hope the Dr diagnosed you right. I was diagnosed with PCOS 3 years ago, and every Dr I've talked to since then has said it was wrong. The only symptoms I had were weight gain/inability to lose it (thyroid issues) , mild hair loss (again...my thyroid....) and 1 little cyst on my right ovary. Since then, they have put me on MetFormin and it screwed my stomach up, so I took myself off it. The only real reason the put me on it was to help get rid of the weight. I'm 5'4" and about 180 lbs. But i'm not very round. I have a lot of untoned muscle. If I could just kick my butt into gear, I'm sure I could get rid of it the natural way. But every insurance company I apply to anymore looks at the MetFormin RX and turns me down immediately. So it screwed me up in more than one way.

Good luck.
August 7, 2009 7:19 AM
Patient information:
Glucophage/Glucophage XR:
Read this information carefully before you start taking this medicine and each time you refill your prescription. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of your doctor's advice. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand some of this information or if you want to know more about this medicine.1 4

What is metformin?
Metformin is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This is also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. People with type 2 diabetes are not able to make enough insulin or respond normally to the insulin their bodies make. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems, including kidney damage, amputations, and blindness. Diabetes is also closely linked to heart disease. The main goal of treating diabetes is to lower your blood sugar to a normal level.

High blood sugar can be lowered by diet and exercise, a number of medicines taken by mouth, and insulin shots. Before you take metformin, try to control your diabetes with exercise and weight loss. While you take your diabetes medicine, continue to exercise and follow the diet advised for your diabetes. No matter what your recommended diabetes management plan is, studies have shown that maintaining good blood sugar control can prevent or delay complications of diabetes, such as blindness.

Metformin IR and ER have the same active ingredient. However, metformin ER tablets work longer in your body. Both of these medicines help control your blood sugar in a number of ways. These include helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. Metformin IR and ER do not cause your body to make more insulin. Because of this, when taken alone, they rarely cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and usually do not cause weight gain. However, when they are taken with a sulfonylurea or with insulin, hypoglycemia is more likely to occur, as is weight gain.1 4

Warning:A small number of people who have taken metformin have developed a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in the blood. This happens more often in people with kidney problems. Most people with kidney problems should not take metformin. (See “What are the adverse reactions of metformin?”)1 4


Who should not take metformin?
Some conditions increase your chance of getting lactic acidosis or cause other problems if you take either of these medicines. Most of the following conditions listed can increase your chance of getting lactic acidosis.

Do not take metformin if you:
have kidney problems
have liver problems
have heart failure that is treated with medicines, such as digoxin or furosemide
drink a lot of alcohol. This means you binge drink for short periods or drink all the time.
are seriously dehydrated (have lost a lot of water from your body)
are going to have an x-ray procedure with injection of dyes (contrast agents)
are going to have surgery
develop a serious condition, such as heart attack, severe infection, or a stroke
are 80 years of age and/or older and you have not had your kidney function tested


Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant. Metformin may not be right for you. Talk with your doctor about your choices. You should also discuss your choices with your doctor if you are breast-feeding a child.1 4


Can metformin tablets be used in children?
Metformin IR tablets have been shown to effectively lower glucose levels in children (10 to 16 years of age) with type 2 diabetes. Metformin has not been studied in children younger than 10 years of age.

Metformin IR tablets have not been studied in combination with other oral glucose-control medicines or insulin in children. If you have any questions about the use of metformin in children, talk with your doctor or other health care provider.

Metformin ER tablets have not been studied in children.1


How should I take metformin?
Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take and when to take it. You will probably start out with a low dose of the medicine. Your doctor may slowly increase your dose until your blood sugar is better controlled. You should take metformin with meals.

Your doctor may have you take other medicines along with metformin to control your blood sugar. These medicines may include insulin shots. Taking metformin with insulin may help you better control your blood sugar while reducing the insulin dose.

Continue your exercise and diet program and test your blood sugar regularly while taking metformin. Your doctor will monitor your diabetes and may perform blood tests on you from time to time to make sure your kidneys and liver are functioning normally. There is no evidence that metformin causes harm to the liver or kidneys.

Tell your doctor if you:
have an illness that causes severe vomiting, diarrhea, or fever, or if you drink a much lower amount of liquid than normal. These conditions can lead to severe dehydration (loss of water in your body). You may need to stop taking metformin for a short time.
plan to have surgery or an x-ray procedure with injection of dye (contrast agent). You may need to stop taking metformin for a short time.
start to take other medicines or change how you take a medicine. Metformin can affect how well other drugs work, and some drugs can affect how well metformin works. Some medicines may cause high blood sugar.


Metformin ER must be swallowed whole and never crushed or chewed. Occasionally, the inactive ingredients of metformin ER may be eliminated as a soft mass in your stool that may look like the original tablet; this is not harmful and will not affect the way metformin ER works to control your diabetes.1 4


What should I avoid while taking metformin?Do not drink a lot of alcoholic drinks while taking metformin. This means you should not binge drink for short periods, and you should not drink a lot of alcohol on a regular basis. Alcohol can increase your chance of getting lactic acidosis.1 4

What are the adverse reactions of metformin?
Lactic acidosis:
In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This buildup can cause serious damage and/or death. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about 1 in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it.

It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood.

Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital.

Signs of lactic acidosis are as follows:
a feeling of weakness, tiredness, or discomfort;
unusual muscle pain;
trouble breathing;
unusual or unexpected stomach discomfort;
a feeling of coldness;
a feeling of dizziness or light-headedness;
sudden development of a slow or irregular heartbeat.


If your medical condition suddenly changes, stop taking metformin and call your doctor right away. This may be a sign of lactic acidosis or another serious side effect.1 4


Other adverse reactions:
Common adverse reactions of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. These adverse reactions generally go away after you take the medicine for a while. Taking your medicine with meals can help reduce these adverse reactions. Tell your doctor if the adverse reactions bother you a lot, last for more than a few weeks, come back after they have gone away, or start later in therapy. You may need a lower dose or need to stop taking the medicine for a short period of time or for good.

About 3 out of every 100 people who take metformin have an unpleasant metallic taste when they start taking the medicine. It lasts for a short time.

Metformin rarely causes hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). However, hypoglycemia can happen if you drink alcohol, take other medicines to lower blood sugar, or do not eat enough.1 4


General advice about prescription medicines:If you have questions or problems, talk with your doctor or other health care provider. You can ask your doctor or pharmacist for the information about metformin that is written for health care providers. Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those described in patient information. Do not use metformin for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not share your medicine with other people.1 4
  27614
August 7, 2009 7:20 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I personally have never taken it, I take the natural approach as you know. However, my friend is a fertility nurse and deals with a lot of patients with PCOS. She said that there is now a new form of Metformin called Glumetza, it's long lasting Metformin and has no side effects. I guess the dose they suggest is 1500 mg/day taken at night in case you do have any side effects (so you sleep through them). I've heard that the side effects of normal Metformin are just terrible, maybe ask your doctor about the Glumetza instead. If your stomach is upset maybe try ginger capsules or peppermint tea to help settle things.
I hope you feel better and figure out something that works for you.
Good luck flowerforyou


Thank you so much for the info on the new Metformin. Will look it up. My stomach only gets upset when I eat but its more like I eat and run to the bathroom (Sorry if its TMI).blushing

Yesterday afternoon was my first dose so I hope as time progresses that it will get better. I have to do 1 a day for the first 3 days and then 2 a day there after. I just want to get my PCOS under control and lose the weight so that I can feel and look healthy again.

Thanks!smile


The doctor did tell you that a low carb diet is the only way to control PCOS and insulin resistance, right?

And they got you a glucometer to test your blood sugar???

Insulin resistance is pre-diabetes and should be treated as such so it does not become full blown diabetes. My doctor ignored me for years and then my OB/GYN told me I had PCOS and by then I had full blown diabetes.
August 7, 2009 7:43 AM
Hello!

I was also recently diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome/insulin resistance. I started on Metformin 1000mg with supper for 2 weeks, then added another 1000mg with breakfast. It was already mentioned that it takes 3 days to 2 weeks for your body to adjust to the dosaging. I have found this to be true for me.

My first week was pretty bad with the diarrhea/loose bowel (sorry too if this is TMI), but just when I got used to it, I added that second dose. I'm 1 week into the second dose and am once again having trouble.

I also agree with the person who said to try more natural foods. I acutally ate hot dogs last night and this morning I'm really struggling with stomach upset.

I've lost 10 pounds already in 3 weeks so we'll see how much more it helps me to lose weight. I've also been doing 30 min. of cardio exercise 5-6 days a week. I do have a glucometer but as for right now my doctor said I don't need to check my blood sugars. I try to eat 160 carbs or less per day and also follow low saturated fat diet. I shoot for 1400 - 1600 calories per day.

Good luck to you!
  18414
August 7, 2009 7:46 AM
I am currently taking MetFormin. I started taking 2 per day (I HAVE TO TAKE WITH FOOD) or right after I get some food in, or I have similar consequences as July24Lioness. Since using MFP and exercise, two a day is too much for me, and I am down to 1 per day. For now maybe the best thing is to follow your Dr.'s advice with the meds, but get active. I can't believe how different I feel. Good Lucksmile and I hope neither of us need the meds soon. flowerforyou
August 7, 2009 7:48 AM
sorry I had the same side effects as sincereme
August 7, 2009 7:51 AM
QUOTE:

Girl, I hope the Dr diagnosed you right. I was diagnosed with PCOS 3 years ago, and every Dr I've talked to since then has said it was wrong. The only symptoms I had were weight gain/inability to lose it (thyroid issues) , mild hair loss (again...my thyroid....) and 1 little cyst on my right ovary. Since then, they have put me on MetFormin and it screwed my stomach up, so I took myself off it. The only real reason the put me on it was to help get rid of the weight. I'm 5'4" and about 180 lbs. But i'm not very round. I have a lot of untoned muscle. If I could just kick my butt into gear, I'm sure I could get rid of it the natural way. But every insurance company I apply to anymore looks at the MetFormin RX and turns me down immediately. So it screwed me up in more than one way.

Good luck.


Actually I was diagnosed 4 yrs ago. I had my very first PCOS episode this weekend. I use to just have the Syndrome but now its full blown. I have many little cysts in my ovaries and one of them ruptured on Sunday morning causing awful pain. Had a Catscan done at the ER and they too verified my PCOS. I have checked my thyroid, etc and the only thing that comes back is my Testostorone being way too high. Plus the Insulin Resistance.
  215757
August 7, 2009 7:55 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I personally have never taken it, I take the natural approach as you know. However, my friend is a fertility nurse and deals with a lot of patients with PCOS. She said that there is now a new form of Metformin called Glumetza, it's long lasting Metformin and has no side effects. I guess the dose they suggest is 1500 mg/day taken at night in case you do have any side effects (so you sleep through them). I've heard that the side effects of normal Metformin are just terrible, maybe ask your doctor about the Glumetza instead. If your stomach is upset maybe try ginger capsules or peppermint tea to help settle things.
I hope you feel better and figure out something that works for you.
Good luck flowerforyou


Thank you so much for the info on the new Metformin. Will look it up. My stomach only gets upset when I eat but its more like I eat and run to the bathroom (Sorry if its TMI).blushing

Yesterday afternoon was my first dose so I hope as time progresses that it will get better. I have to do 1 a day for the first 3 days and then 2 a day there after. I just want to get my PCOS under control and lose the weight so that I can feel and look healthy again.

Thanks!smile


The doctor did tell you that a low carb diet is the only way to control PCOS and insulin resistance, right?

And they got you a glucometer to test your blood sugar???

Insulin resistance is pre-diabetes and should be treated as such so it does not become full blown diabetes. My doctor ignored me for years and then my OB/GYN told me I had PCOS and by then I had full blown diabetes.



Yes they did mention the low carbs, etc. They didn't give me a Glucometer though. Should I ask for one?
  215757
August 7, 2009 8:05 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I personally have never taken it, I take the natural approach as you know. However, my friend is a fertility nurse and deals with a lot of patients with PCOS. She said that there is now a new form of Metformin called Glumetza, it's long lasting Metformin and has no side effects. I guess the dose they suggest is 1500 mg/day taken at night in case you do have any side effects (so you sleep through them). I've heard that the side effects of normal Metformin are just terrible, maybe ask your doctor about the Glumetza instead. If your stomach is upset maybe try ginger capsules or peppermint tea to help settle things.
I hope you feel better and figure out something that works for you.
Good luck flowerforyou


Thank you so much for the info on the new Metformin. Will look it up. My stomach only gets upset when I eat but its more like I eat and run to the bathroom (Sorry if its TMI).blushing

Yesterday afternoon was my first dose so I hope as time progresses that it will get better. I have to do 1 a day for the first 3 days and then 2 a day there after. I just want to get my PCOS under control and lose the weight so that I can feel and look healthy again.

Thanks!smile


The doctor did tell you that a low carb diet is the only way to control PCOS and insulin resistance, right?

And they got you a glucometer to test your blood sugar???

Insulin resistance is pre-diabetes and should be treated as such so it does not become full blown diabetes. My doctor ignored me for years and then my OB/GYN told me I had PCOS and by then I had full blown diabetes.



Yes they did mention the low carbs, etc. They didn't give me a Glucometer though. Should I ask for one?


I would, just to test to see if certain foods spike your blood sugar. Like oranges, bananas, pineapple, mangos, a lot of the tropical fruits spike my blood sugar really, really high. Always did.

The only pasta I found that I can eat is DreamsField and I can only have it once or twice a month or it spikes it..........

I can have half a sweet potato with no issues, but a full one or even a small bit of white potato will spike it up.

The main thing is to take as much of the processed foods out of your eating and eat a lot of whole, unprocessed clean foods.

You will have to limit the amount of fruit you eat.

I tend to stick to berries of all kinds, apples, peaches, nectarines, plums, kiwi, cherries as my fruit staples.

My doctor was really good. He has boxes of The South Diet and The Atkins New Diet Revolution in a closet in his office. When he diagnoses someone with PCOS and insulin resistance, or in my case diabetes - he IMMEDIATELY writes the prescription for Metformin, a glucometer and testing supplies, gets a referral over to an endocrinologist and hands you both the Atkins book and the South Beach diet. He told me to read over both books, make a decision on which one I could do for life, start and stick with it.............

It has taken me 6 years to finally stick with it though - even though every start and stop I learned more and more to make it a lifestyle change. I have had to baby step my way through it until this year and it has now clicked.
Edited by July24Lioness On August 7, 2009 8:08 AM
August 7, 2009 8:17 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I personally have never taken it, I take the natural approach as you know. However, my friend is a fertility nurse and deals with a lot of patients with PCOS. She said that there is now a new form of Metformin called Glumetza, it's long lasting Metformin and has no side effects. I guess the dose they suggest is 1500 mg/day taken at night in case you do have any side effects (so you sleep through them). I've heard that the side effects of normal Metformin are just terrible, maybe ask your doctor about the Glumetza instead. If your stomach is upset maybe try ginger capsules or peppermint tea to help settle things.
I hope you feel better and figure out something that works for you.
Good luck flowerforyou


Thank you so much for the info on the new Metformin. Will look it up. My stomach only gets upset when I eat but its more like I eat and run to the bathroom (Sorry if its TMI).blushing

Yesterday afternoon was my first dose so I hope as time progresses that it will get better. I have to do 1 a day for the first 3 days and then 2 a day there after. I just want to get my PCOS under control and lose the weight so that I can feel and look healthy again.

Thanks!smile


The doctor did tell you that a low carb diet is the only way to control PCOS and insulin resistance, right?

And they got you a glucometer to test your blood sugar???

Insulin resistance is pre-diabetes and should be treated as such so it does not become full blown diabetes. My doctor ignored me for years and then my OB/GYN told me I had PCOS and by then I had full blown diabetes.



Yes they did mention the low carbs, etc. They didn't give me a Glucometer though. Should I ask for one?


I would, just to test to see if certain foods spike your blood sugar. Like oranges, bananas, pineapple, mangos, a lot of the tropical fruits spike my blood sugar really, really high. Always did.

The only pasta I found that I can eat is DreamsField and I can only have it once or twice a month or it spikes it..........

I can have half a sweet potato with no issues, but a full one or even a small bit of white potato will spike it up.

The main thing is to take as much of the processed foods out of your eating and eat a lot of whole, unprocessed clean foods.

You will have to limit the amount of fruit you eat.

I tend to stick to berries of all kinds, apples, peaches, nectarines, plums, kiwi, cherries as my fruit staples.

My doctor was really good. He has boxes of The South Diet and The Atkins New Diet Revolution in a closet in his office. When he diagnoses someone with PCOS and insulin resistance, or in my case diabetes - he IMMEDIATELY writes the prescription for Metformin, a glucometer and testing supplies, gets a referral over to an endocrinologist and hands you both the Atkins book and the South Beach diet. He told me to read over both books, make a decision on which one I could do for life, start and stick with it.............

It has taken me 6 years to finally stick with it though - even though every start and stop I learned more and more to make it a lifestyle change. I have had to baby step my way through it until this year and it has now clicked.


I do for the most part try to follow the Low Carb diet. I went to a Dietician who was really good at expalining Carbs and Net Carbs etc. Im more of an apple person so I usually have 1/2 an apple with either a Cheese stick or PB.

Should I ask for a Gluco meter? I didnt know they gave it to Insulin Resistant patients.
  215757
August 7, 2009 8:30 AM
If they didn't give you one, I would ask for them to give you one.
August 7, 2009 8:36 AM
QUOTE:

If they didn't give you one, I would ask for them to give you one.


I Actually put a call in to my doctor. Just waiting to get back to me. Thanks a bunches.
  215757
August 7, 2009 9:12 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I personally have never taken it, I take the natural approach as you know. However, my friend is a fertility nurse and deals with a lot of patients with PCOS. She said that there is now a new form of Metformin called Glumetza, it's long lasting Metformin and has no side effects. I guess the dose they suggest is 1500 mg/day taken at night in case you do have any side effects (so you sleep through them). I've heard that the side effects of normal Metformin are just terrible, maybe ask your doctor about the Glumetza instead. If your stomach is upset maybe try ginger capsules or peppermint tea to help settle things.
I hope you feel better and figure out something that works for you.
Good luck flowerforyou


Thank you so much for the info on the new Metformin. Will look it up. My stomach only gets upset when I eat but its more like I eat and run to the bathroom (Sorry if its TMI).blushing

Yesterday afternoon was my first dose so I hope as time progresses that it will get better. I have to do 1 a day for the first 3 days and then 2 a day there after. I just want to get my PCOS under control and lose the weight so that I can feel and look healthy again.

Thanks!smile


The doctor did tell you that a low carb diet is the only way to control PCOS and insulin resistance, right?

And they got you a glucometer to test your blood sugar???

Insulin resistance is pre-diabetes and should be treated as such so it does not become full blown diabetes. My doctor ignored me for years and then my OB/GYN told me I had PCOS and by then I had full blown diabetes.



Yes they did mention the low carbs, etc. They didn't give me a Glucometer though. Should I ask for one?


I would, just to test to see if certain foods spike your blood sugar. Like oranges, bananas, pineapple, mangos, a lot of the tropical fruits spike my blood sugar really, really high. Always did.

The only pasta I found that I can eat is DreamsField and I can only have it once or twice a month or it spikes it..........

I can have half a sweet potato with no issues, but a full one or even a small bit of white potato will spike it up.

The main thing is to take as much of the processed foods out of your eating and eat a lot of whole, unprocessed clean foods.

You will have to limit the amount of fruit you eat.

I tend to stick to berries of all kinds, apples, peaches, nectarines, plums, kiwi, cherries as my fruit staples.

My doctor was really good. He has boxes of The South Diet and The Atkins New Diet Revolution in a closet in his office. When he diagnoses someone with PCOS and insulin resistance, or in my case diabetes - he IMMEDIATELY writes the prescription for Metformin, a glucometer and testing supplies, gets a referral over to an endocrinologist and hands you both the Atkins book and the South Beach diet. He told me to read over both books, make a decision on which one I could do for life, start and stick with it.............

It has taken me 6 years to finally stick with it though - even though every start and stop I learned more and more to make it a lifestyle change. I have had to baby step my way through it until this year and it has now clicked.


I do for the most part try to follow the Low Carb diet. I went to a Dietician who was really good at expalining Carbs and Net Carbs etc. Im more of an apple person so I usually have 1/2 an apple with either a Cheese stick or PB.

Should I ask for a Gluco meter? I didnt know they gave it to Insulin Resistant patients.


Well honestly for me a low carb diet wasn't enough, I take a lot of vitamins and things to control my blood sugar along with using a lot of cinnamon etc. I have done a lot of research, I'd be careful with saying that a low carb diet is the ONLY way to control PCOS, perhaps it is the best way that works for you as an individual. Personally I need more help than just that and am considering going on the Glumetza myself because it has been impossible for me to lose weight and I've heard from reliable sources that this works great for controlling it and helps with the other symptoms as well. So different things work for different people, my sugars are fine with what I am doing. My doctor has also told me that the Atkins diet is very unhealthy, so I guess it depends on what your Dr believes in too.
And Sincereme I am glad to offer suggestions so that you may find what works best for you. I hope you start feeling better soon. flowerforyou
  194687
August 7, 2009 9:41 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I personally have never taken it, I take the natural approach as you know. However, my friend is a fertility nurse and deals with a lot of patients with PCOS. She said that there is now a new form of Metformin called Glumetza, it's long lasting Metformin and has no side effects. I guess the dose they suggest is 1500 mg/day taken at night in case you do have any side effects (so you sleep through them). I've heard that the side effects of normal Metformin are just terrible, maybe ask your doctor about the Glumetza instead. If your stomach is upset maybe try ginger capsules or peppermint tea to help settle things.
I hope you feel better and figure out something that works for you.
Good luck flowerforyou


Thank you so much for the info on the new Metformin. Will look it up. My stomach only gets upset when I eat but its more like I eat and run to the bathroom (Sorry if its TMI).blushing

Yesterday afternoon was my first dose so I hope as time progresses that it will get better. I have to do 1 a day for the first 3 days and then 2 a day there after. I just want to get my PCOS under control and lose the weight so that I can feel and look healthy again.

Thanks!smile


The doctor did tell you that a low carb diet is the only way to control PCOS and insulin resistance, right?

And they got you a glucometer to test your blood sugar???

Insulin resistance is pre-diabetes and should be treated as such so it does not become full blown diabetes. My doctor ignored me for years and then my OB/GYN told me I had PCOS and by then I had full blown diabetes.



Yes they did mention the low carbs, etc. They didn't give me a Glucometer though. Should I ask for one?


I would, just to test to see if certain foods spike your blood sugar. Like oranges, bananas, pineapple, mangos, a lot of the tropical fruits spike my blood sugar really, really high. Always did.

The only pasta I found that I can eat is DreamsField and I can only have it once or twice a month or it spikes it..........

I can have half a sweet potato with no issues, but a full one or even a small bit of white potato will spike it up.

The main thing is to take as much of the processed foods out of your eating and eat a lot of whole, unprocessed clean foods.

You will have to limit the amount of fruit you eat.

I tend to stick to berries of all kinds, apples, peaches, nectarines, plums, kiwi, cherries as my fruit staples.

My doctor was really good. He has boxes of The South Diet and The Atkins New Diet Revolution in a closet in his office. When he diagnoses someone with PCOS and insulin resistance, or in my case diabetes - he IMMEDIATELY writes the prescription for Metformin, a glucometer and testing supplies, gets a referral over to an endocrinologist and hands you both the Atkins book and the South Beach diet. He told me to read over both books, make a decision on which one I could do for life, start and stick with it.............

It has taken me 6 years to finally stick with it though - even though every start and stop I learned more and more to make it a lifestyle change. I have had to baby step my way through it until this year and it has now clicked.


I do for the most part try to follow the Low Carb diet. I went to a Dietician who was really good at expalining Carbs and Net Carbs etc. Im more of an apple person so I usually have 1/2 an apple with either a Cheese stick or PB.

Should I ask for a Gluco meter? I didnt know they gave it to Insulin Resistant patients.


Well honestly for me a low carb diet wasn't enough, I take a lot of vitamins and things to control my blood sugar along with using a lot of cinnamon etc. I have done a lot of research, I'd be careful with saying that a low carb diet is the ONLY way to control PCOS, perhaps it is the best way that works for you as an individual. Personally I need more help than just that and am considering going on the Glumetza myself because it has been impossible for me to lose weight and I've heard from reliable sources that this works great for controlling it and helps with the other symptoms as well. So different things work for different people, my sugars are fine with what I am doing. My doctor has also told me that the Atkins diet is very unhealthy, so I guess it depends on what your Dr believes in too.
And Sincereme I am glad to offer suggestions so that you may find what works best for you. I hope you start feeling better soon. flowerforyou


I agree with you. I don't think Low Carb is the only way to control it because thats what Ive been doing for a while and yes I lose 5 - 10 lbs but it comes right back. Im going to see if atleast the Metformin helps me even more. I just don't like the side effects but hey I just gotta get my body use to it.

Thanks alot for everything.flowerforyou
  215757
August 7, 2009 9:44 AM
Yes, this is what you and I talked about before, lol, wink we both have the same issue, losing and gaining the same 5 pounds 10 times!! (It seems like ten anyway, lol). That's why I too am thinking of giving into the drugs, I'm going to talk to my doctor when I see her next week and see what she says.
flowerforyou Jenn
  194687
August 7, 2009 10:00 AM
QUOTE:

Yes, this is what you and I talked about before, lol, wink we both have the same issue, losing and gaining the same 5 pounds 10 times!! (It seems like ten anyway, lol). That's why I too am thinking of giving into the drugs, I'm going to talk to my doctor when I see her next week and see what she says.
flowerforyou Jenn



Well, I just started my Glucophage yesterday. I will be seeing my MD on monday to see if he will give me a prescription for the Glucose Meter. They never mentioned it before but since reading it here I am curious to know if I should be monitoring that on a daily basis. I will keep you posted.wink
  215757
August 7, 2009 10:55 AM
I have taken an extended release version of metformin for several years now. No major side effects. Not sure what is different about the Glumetza other than a higher co-pay.

As for the glucometer, if your doctors give you the right diagnosis and writes a prescription for the glucometer and supplies, some insurance companies will cover the costs. Test strips can get expensive, so if you can get them covered, do so!
  181734
August 7, 2009 11:55 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Yes, this is what you and I talked about before, lol, wink we both have the same issue, losing and gaining the same 5 pounds 10 times!! (It seems like ten anyway, lol). That's why I too am thinking of giving into the drugs, I'm going to talk to my doctor when I see her next week and see what she says.
flowerforyou Jenn



Well, I just started my Glucophage yesterday. I will be seeing my MD on monday to see if he will give me a prescription for the Glucose Meter. They never mentioned it before but since reading it here I am curious to know if I should be monitoring that on a daily basis. I will keep you posted.wink


Sounds good, I would like to know as well bigsmile
  194687
August 7, 2009 3:07 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Well honestly for me a low carb diet wasn't enough, I take a lot of vitamins and things to control my blood sugar along with using a lot of cinnamon etc. I have done a lot of research, I'd be careful with saying that a low carb diet is the ONLY way to control PCOS, perhaps it is the best way that works for you as an individual. Personally I need more help than just that and am considering going on the Glumetza myself because it has been impossible for me to lose weight and I've heard from reliable sources that this works great for controlling it and helps with the other symptoms as well. So different things work for different people, my sugars are fine with what I am doing. My doctor has also told me that the Atkins diet is very unhealthy, so I guess it depends on what your Dr believes in too.
And Sincereme I am glad to offer suggestions so that you may find what works best for you. I hope you start feeling better soon. flowerforyou


I agree with you. I don't think Low Carb is the only way to control it because thats what Ive been doing for a while and yes I lose 5 - 10 lbs but it comes right back. Im going to see if atleast the Metformin helps me even more. I just don't like the side effects but hey I just gotta get my body use to it.

Thanks alot for everything.flowerforyou


Well, I am living proof from going from insulin resistance to full blown diabetes when I went off the low carb plan.

Every doctor that I have been to since my diagnosis says that controlling carb intake is the only way to combat PCOS.

Most doctors automatically state that Atkisn is unhealthy without knowing anything about the plan. There is nothing unhealthy about eating protein and green veggies for 2 weeks to get rid of sugar cravings and then start adding in the higher carb veggies, nuts, fruit, dairy and eventually some grains if your body can handle it.

Low carb is not something you do for a time period, it is a lifestyle change to eat, natural, unprocessed foods.

My doctor also told me the same thing that Dr. Atkins states in his book. Eat organically when you possibly can. Eat grass fed beef, free range pork and chicken, wild caught fish, farm eggs. There are too many hormones and anti-biotics in the foods that we purchase from main stream grocery stores and that will continuously mess with your hormones too.

I have the proof of my blood work posted in my signature also, it is getting better and better every 3 months that I get it done.

Here is an article discussing the reason that LC is the way to go with PCOS.

QUOTE:
A study published in March 2006 confirmed that a low-carb diet improves the symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) (1).

The authors stated “a moderate reduction in dietary carbohydrate reduced the fasting and post-challenge insulin concentrations among women with PCOS, which, over time, may improve reproductive/endocrine outcomes.”

Stripped of the jargon, what does this all mean? Since the root cause of PCOS in most cases is Insulin Resistance, a low-carb diet can help to improve your body’s response to insulin.

With Insulin Resistance, the body becomes insensitive to the insulin it produces, leading to elevated circulating levels of insulin. This, in turn, causes hormonal imbalances, such as increased testosterone and other androgens (masculinizing hormones), associated with PCOS.

The hormonal imbalance leads to the symptoms many women experience with PCOS, such as irregular menses, excess facial and body hair, acne and brown skin patches and male-pattern hair loss. PCOS can prevent ovulation, making it impossible to become pregnant.

Elevated insulin levels also contribute to weight gain, as well as the formation of cysts on the ovaries, in part due to hormonal imbalances and also because the ovaries are highly sensitive to the influence of insulin.

Eating a diet low in carbs can lower your insulin levels and improve many symptoms of PCOS. The study also showed women who ate a low- carb diet reduced their triglycerides and testosterone levels, which are commonly elevated in women with PCOS. The low carb diet helped to decrease overall insulin secretion, improving Insulin Resistance.

Examine your diet today and start decreasing your carb intake gradually. The best way to get started is by cutting out high carb foods such as potatoes, bread, white rice, corn, pastries, cookies and tortillas.

A useful resource to check how many carbs are in certain foods is a carb counter such as the one found at www.carb-counter.org. This is an excellent way to get started on improving your health.

Long-lasting dietary changes are difficult to make, so don’t be hard on yourself if they don’t occur overnight. Just remember to get back on track after any setbacks and you will soon be pleased with the results.

(1) Douglas CC, Gower BA, Darnell BE, Ovalle F, Oster RA, Azziz R.,
Role of diet in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.
Fertil Steril. 2006 Mar;85(3):679-88. PMID: 16500338
August 7, 2009 3:10 PM
I took the regular Metformin- OMG MY TUMMY! Yowch!

On the recommendation of a member here on MFP I switched to the ER (extended release) version and I've had Zero problems out of it now.

It works really well for me. Now after I eat I don't pass out or get the shakes. Also, unlike with the regular Metformin, I don't have to eat a carb-heavy meal. I can eat meat and cheese with the Metformin ER and have no side-effects.

Good luck ! flowerforyou
August 7, 2009 3:14 PM
One thing I don't do is to speak without knowing about the subject I am speaking about.

I have had 6 years of experience with insulin resistance to full blown diabetes and PCOS. I have learned A LOT through trial and error, going on and then stopping the low carb lifestyle.


Please read some of these articles concerning Low Carb and PCOS.

http://www.ovarian-cysts-pcos.com/diet-news8.html

http://www.lowcarb.ca/articlesb/article305.html

http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu/~cp391990/carb.html

http://www.rtfm.com/lowcarb/lc-pcos.html

Other women that are in your shoes:

http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/general-health-medical-issues/467691-anyone-else-using-lc-fight-pcos.html

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