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TOPIC: Watermelon Melts Fat?

 
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May 25, 2012 10:13 AM
Someone told me in passing that eating watermelon as part of your daily diet can help reduce belly fat when done with daily exercise. Can anyone confirm this? I'm told it has something to do with the acids in the fruit.

Either way, I eat watermelon daily anyhow because I love it. If it helps me lose weight, all the better.
  19648354
May 25, 2012 10:14 AM
I don't think there is any food that "melts" fat. Sorry.
May 25, 2012 10:15 AM
Watermelon is an excellent addition to a weight loss plan, particularly in summer when it is plentiful and fresh. Some diets can go to extremes and use watermelon as the sole replacement for a healthy eating plan with a variety of foods. This is not a healthy long term strategy for weight loss, and will almost certainly result in a rebound weight gain or even in malnutrition. However, the underlying principle of using watermelon as a weight loss aid has value when done in moderation. Here are some of the benefits of eating this sweet summer treat.
Watermelon is Low in Calories

The main benefit of watermelon to weight loss is that it is low in calories. It is made up of around 92% water and is very filling. Watermelon also contains some healthy nutrients such as vitamin C and lycopene, but is only 30 calories per 100 grams. It is sweet and delicious, so it can be used as a satisfying replacement for high calorie snacks or desserts. Keep a few slices in the fridge for when a craving hits.
Watermelon is Versatile

While watermelon is usually only eaten fresh and raw in slices, it can be prepared in many different ways. It can be frozen and eaten like a sorbet or blended and sipped as juice. It can be used in a cold soup or salsa, the rind can be cooked as a vegetable and the seeds roasted for a very nutritious snack. Watermelon can even be grilled like steak, and when prepared in this way is said to have a texture similar to tuna. Being so versatile, watermelon will not quickly lose its appeal and can be added to meals in different ways to bulk them up without adding calories.
Watermelon as a Sports Drink

Watermelon can be used as a low calorie, refreshing snack on a hot day, and will help to replace lost electrolytes such as potassium. This can help you to maintain energy levels and hydration when exercising in the summer without resorting to sports drinks, which are often high in calories.
The Benefits of Citrulline

The white portion of watermelon, and the rind itself, contain citrulline, which is an amino acid that is used in sports supplements to decrease muscle fatigue. It works by relaxing the blood vessels. Decreasing muscle fatigue allows you to exercise for longer periods, as well as recover more quickly. Try digging a little deeper into your watermelon slice to get the benefit of the white section, or try grilling or pickling the watermelon rind.
Watermelon is a Rich Source of Antioxidants

Watermelon has good levels of vitamin C and A as well as lycopene, all powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants can help to mop up free radicals that might cause or exacerbate conditions like asthma and heart disease. Consuming a good amount of antioxidants will help to keep you healthy, which will in turn allow you to continue exercising and feeling good.
Watermelon is filling, nutritious and a good substitute for fattening sweets when it comes to losing weight. Watermelon can easily and effectively be made a part of a healthy weight loss plan.
  16863742
May 25, 2012 10:16 AM
I was actually told to stay away from watermelon because it has a high glycemic index and will make your blood sugar spike.
May 25, 2012 10:25 AM
QUOTE:

I was actually told to stay away from watermelon because it has a high glycemic index and will make your blood sugar spike.


It does have a fairly high glycemic index at 80 but it also has all the benefits listed above. So moderate amounts, especially after a hard workout, is fine. It helps rehydration, replenishes electrolytes and glycogen store. So, I'd say, stay away is too strong a term. Eat it in moderation would be a better term.
May 25, 2012 10:30 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I was actually told to stay away from watermelon because it has a high glycemic index and will make your blood sugar spike.


It does have a fairly high glycemic index at 80 but it also has all the benefits listed above. So moderate amounts, especially after a hard workout, is fine. It helps rehydration, replenishes electrolytes and glycogen store. So, I'd say, stay away is too strong a term. Eat it in moderation would be a better term.


I am the image of poor watermelon moderation. I LOVE them and sometimes if I have a low calorie amount left and am too lazy to make dinner, Ill eat half of a watermelon. Just cut it in half and eat with a spoon out of it like a bowl :)
  19648354
June 12, 2012 7:58 AM
Glycemic Concerns
Many people are hesitant to add watermelon to their weight loss diet because it is thought to have a a lot of sugar that can raise your blood glucose levels. When your blood glucose levels are increased, your body releases insulin which can cause fat storage. Watermelon has a glycemic index of 72, which places it among other high glycemic foods that will raise your blood sugar levels. Dr. Bowden claims that the glycemic index is not an accurate measure of after-meal insulin response because it does not account for the quantity of carbohydrates a food has. The "glycemic load" does and watermelon has a glycemic load of four, which is "ridiculous low," indicating that will have an insignificant effect on your blood sugar levels.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/442869-the-effects-of-watermelon-weight-loss/#ixzz1xaitk52b
  16863742
June 12, 2012 8:01 AM
QUOTE:

I don't think there is any food that "melts" fat. Sorry.


I agree because not one food can dictate your diet
  24017416

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