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TOPIC: Mindless eating.

 
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May 25, 2012 1:39 AM
I was watching a show on channel 4, (secret eaters) and it got me thinking that I am a secret eater.
Years ago when I used to selfharm I used an elastic band on my wrist and if I felt the need to selfharm I would snap the band against my wrist.
I was considering trying the same thing to help me with my weight loss.
Maybe if when I am about to eat something I snap a band against my wrist, not as a punishment but as a warning to ensure that I am thinking about what I am eating and just not mindlessly eating.
The only problem I can see myself is that I work in a kitchen where I can not wear anything on my wrist, but I'm sure I can pinch my wrist if needed.

What do you guys think?
Edited by antiwings On May 25, 2012 1:39 AM
May 25, 2012 1:45 AM
I think that a similar technique is used for obsessive type behaviour which involves tapping your collarbone. Same idea, it distracts your mind away from repeating the pattern. Did you work out the elastic band thing yourself or was this part of therapy? It's a good idea and probably a bit more discrete than randomly tapping your chest.
  7779543
May 25, 2012 2:28 AM
QUOTE:

I think that a similar technique is used for obsessive type behaviour which involves tapping your collarbone. Same idea, it distracts your mind away from repeating the pattern. Did you work out the elastic band thing yourself or was this part of therapy? It's a good idea and probably a bit more discrete than randomly tapping your chest.


It was part of the therapy that I was given. The Idea was that the snapping would give you the pain that you needed from selfharming without actually causing long lasting damage.
When I used to snap the band I would think, why do I want to do this to myself and gradually I didn't feel the need anymore. So, I'm hoping I get the same gratification from the band and eating.
May 25, 2012 2:33 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I think that a similar technique is used for obsessive type behaviour which involves tapping your collarbone. Same idea, it distracts your mind away from repeating the pattern. Did you work out the elastic band thing yourself or was this part of therapy? It's a good idea and probably a bit more discrete than randomly tapping your chest.


It was part of the therapy that I was given. The Idea was that the snapping would give you the pain that you needed from selfharming without actually causing long lasting damage.
When I used to snap the band I would think, why do I want to do this to myself and gradually I didn't feel the need anymore. So, I'm hoping I get the same gratification from the band and eating.

wow i never thought to do that
  15763386
May 25, 2012 2:40 AM
QUOTE:

I was watching a show on channel 4, (secret eaters) and it got me thinking that I am a secret eater.
Years ago when I used to selfharm I used an elastic band on my wrist and if I felt the need to selfharm I would snap the band against my wrist.
I was considering trying the same thing to help me with my weight loss.
Maybe if when I am about to eat something I snap a band against my wrist, not as a punishment but as a warning to ensure that I am thinking about what I am eating and just not mindlessly eating.
The only problem I can see myself is that I work in a kitchen where I can not wear anything on my wrist, but I'm sure I can pinch my wrist if needed.

What do you guys think?


Hmmmm. I always hear different things about gum--some people say it makes them hungry, some say it gives them the sensation of eating (chewing and tasting obviously) so they won't pick up a snack. It personally makes me feel full.

Right now, I know one thing I'm doing...........which is kind of funny, but don't laugh....is giving snacks a long, death glare.

I'M DEAD SERIOUS.

I had an obsession I'm still breaking from with eating entire big grab bags of Flamin' Hot Cheetos within minutes....and now, whenever I see them in the store or see someone with them, I just stare at the bag for a long time, give it the stink eye. Then just repeat over and over in my head that THAT is the reason I gained weight and THAT is the reason I have cravings.

With natural, unprocessed foods, you won't get those kinds of weird food cravings...so yeah. There is my quirky little input.

Good luck. It's a tough battle.

Edit: Oh! And TRYYYYY, try, try not to eat or snack while watching television. It's the devil.
Edited by simplymaladroit On May 25, 2012 2:42 AM
May 25, 2012 2:44 AM
I think you're right that distraction is going to help. We have a sandwich man that comes to our office half way between breakfast and lunch - just when I'm feeling weak - and he has the most delicious flapjack that must be a good 800 kcals a slice. I distract myself by singing "I'm a little teapot" in my head until he's gone. I don't know what started it, but it works really well :) The downside is that my colleagues think I'm a little crazy, bobbing along to myself and inanely grinning.

Pinching yourself could bruise, what about pressing down one foot on top of the other or literally biting your tongue? I chew my tongue a lot, I guess it's my subconscious trying to simulate eating.
May 25, 2012 2:48 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I was watching a show on channel 4, (secret eaters) and it got me thinking that I am a secret eater.
Years ago when I used to selfharm I used an elastic band on my wrist and if I felt the need to selfharm I would snap the band against my wrist.
I was considering trying the same thing to help me with my weight loss.
Maybe if when I am about to eat something I snap a band against my wrist, not as a punishment but as a warning to ensure that I am thinking about what I am eating and just not mindlessly eating.
The only problem I can see myself is that I work in a kitchen where I can not wear anything on my wrist, but I'm sure I can pinch my wrist if needed.

What do you guys think?


Hmmmm. I always hear different things about gum--some people say it makes them hungry, some say it gives them the sensation of eating (chewing and tasting obviously) so they won't pick up a snack. It personally makes me feel full.

Right now, I know one thing I'm doing...........which is kind of funny, but don't laugh....is giving snacks a long, death glare.

I'M DEAD SERIOUS.

I had an obsession I'm still breaking from with eating entire big grab bags of Flamin' Hot Cheetos within minutes....and now, whenever I see them in the store or see someone with them, I just stare at the bag for a long time, give it the stink eye. Then just repeat over and over in my head that THAT is the reason I gained weight and THAT is the reason I have cravings.

With natural, unprocessed foods, you won't get those kinds of weird food cravings...so yeah. There is my quirky little input.

Good luck. It's a tough battle.

Edit: Oh! And TRYYYYY, try, try not to eat or snack while watching television. It's the devil.


I could try that, but Its hard working in a kitchen. I would forever be giving everything the stink eye, but maybe it would work while doing my weekly shop. :) Thanks for your help ^^
May 25, 2012 2:49 AM
QUOTE:

I think you're right that distraction is going to help. We have a sandwich man that comes to our office half way between breakfast and lunch - just when I'm feeling weak - and he has the most delicious flapjack that must be a good 800 kcals a slice. I distract myself by singing "I'm a little teapot" in my head until he's gone. I don't know what started it, but it works really well :) The downside is that my colleagues think I'm a little crazy, bobbing along to myself and inanely grinning.

Pinching yourself could bruise, what about pressing down one foot on top of the other or literally biting your tongue? I chew my tongue a lot, I guess it's my subconscious trying to simulate eating.

Ooo biting my tongue would be good at work :) It's so tempting to pick at the chicken nuggets while working :(

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