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TOPIC: Anyone Vegan or Vegetarian?

 
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May 17, 2012 5:38 AM
I'm ovo-lacto. For protein I eat eggs, cheese, greek yogurt, nuts, whole grains, PB, edamame, quinoa, tofu, beans, chickpeas, lentils, and there's more I'm forgetting! When all else fails, protein powder and bars.
  2908107
May 17, 2012 5:40 AM
vegetarian my entire life..i have never even tasted meat. i don't eat eggs ( unless they are ' invisible') and don't consider people who eat fish to be vegetarians. I really don't miss what I have never tried, no matter how good bacon sandwiches smell.
  6593535
May 17, 2012 5:44 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm mostly vegetarian (I eat fish, yogurt and the occasional egg) slowly transitioning to veganism just by making more vegan meals and dishes. I just made an awesome banana-quinoa-cashew quick bread that was only 108 calories per serving :)


This would make you a pescatarian, not a "mostly vegetarian", as there is no such thing. :-)


It's true that the correct word is pescatarian, however, it is easier to say "mostly vegetarian" than to have to explain what pescatarian is. People get "mostly vegetarian" when you're talking to restaurant workers, people at a party, and so on. Sometimes I just say that I eat "healthy."
May 17, 2012 5:47 AM
As far as what to eat, I would eat lots of beans, fresh fruit and vegetables. And for what to eat there are lots of books at your public library, assuming you live in an area with a nearby public library. Feel free to friend/follow me but don't take yesterdays menu for an example. Ate healthy, vegetarian stuff but too much of it!
May 17, 2012 5:52 AM


It's true that the correct word is pescatarian, however, it is easier to say "mostly vegetarian" than to have to explain what pescatarian is. People get "mostly vegetarian" when you're talking to restaurant workers, people at a party, and so on. Sometimes I just say that I eat "healthy."


I totally understand your point but replacing vegetarianism for 'eating healthy' isn't that interchangeable..I have been veggie since birth and ballooned to 260 lbs on a veggie diet...go figure!
  6593535
May 17, 2012 6:07 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm mostly vegetarian (I eat fish, yogurt and the occasional egg) slowly transitioning to veganism just by making more vegan meals and dishes. I just made an awesome banana-quinoa-cashew quick bread that was only 108 calories per serving :)


This would make you a pescatarian, not a "mostly vegetarian", as there is no such thing. :-)


Thank you, I appreciate your opinion, but I think "mostly vegetarian" describes my diet just fine :) I'm actually mostly vegan. Most days, I don't consume any animal products. I'm not morally opposed to eating seafood and do so about two or three times per month, but 80+ meals per month are entirely plant-based and often free of animal products altogether.

Not everyone means "vegetarian" to describe a political identity.

I also don't recommend soy-based meat substitutes, as for the most part, they're loaded with sugar, sodium and preservatives to make them taste edible. If you're looking for extra protein, I recommend experimenting with legumes and whole soy products such as tempeh, tofu, edamame and soy nuts. Organic and GMO-free only, though! But that's just me.



being vegetarian isn't a political identity. Hitler was a vegetarian and didn't use his diet as a means of gaining political standing or kudos. Being a vegetarian is a a lifestyle choice..I don't see how it makes people 'political.
  6593535
May 17, 2012 6:32 AM
First, let's just ignore any negativity fighting over the definition of vegetarianism. So silly to waste energy on something like that.

Anyway, I became a vegetarian my junior year in college, so that was in 2003 I believe, making me meat free for about 9 years now. When I first started, it was due to a class in college in which we learned about the meat industry and over-consumption of meat, especially in America, and it just turned my stomach so much that I could not bring myself to eat meat any longer. I thought I would get my taste for meat back, but I never have. The problem at that time was that I REALLY did not know the proper way to eat in the first place, much less as a vegetarian. LOTS of pasta, carbs in general, cheese, cheese, and oh, did I mention cheese, and processed junk. This obviously did not lead me down a great road weight-wise, and on several ocassions, I noticed that several people looked quite shocked to find out that I was a vegetarian, since my body did not exactly scream, "I eat vegetables!!!"
A few years after college, I lost some of the weight that I had gained, and tried to eat a more balanced diet. It was definitely better than what I was eating before, but at that time, I included a lot of soy products that I try not to really eat any more (veggie burgers, veggie sausage, etc).
I slipped back into old ways after my wedding (newlywed bliss makes you forget the rest of the world sometimes, oops), and gained all the weight back and then some. Which brings me to present day...
I am working on trying to really balance out my vegetarian diet to give my body what it really needs. I think I am on a good path, and my diary is open, so you are welcome to follow me or friend me or whatever, if you like. My general philosophy now is: eat as many whole foods as possible- that is, try to cook and eat fresh, not from a box, can or any container (this is a general rule and I try not to overthink it), get protein from natural sources like nuts, quinoa, chia seeds, hemp seeds, and limited dairy (the HARDEST part for me!!!), eat vegetables with every meal and never feel bad about eating as much vegetables as you damn well please, and finally, every once in a while, eat whatever you want!!!
May 17, 2012 6:38 AM
QUOTE:

Labels are like numbers on the scale. It indicates a general ball park, but is not an accurate measurement by any means. Most of the time, labels are just a source of unnecessary conflict!

I applaud everyone who eats vegan but on an odd day eats a slice of cheese. I applaud everyone vegetarian who sometimes just really wants a slice of bacon. I applaud everyone who eats fish but is not afraid to say he or she supports vegetarianism.

Animals, the environment, and your health benefit more from an imperfect long term commitment in the right direction, than a perfect short term commitment under the right label.

So forget labels, call yourself what you will, and eat what makes you feel good about your food. :)


^^^this!!!^^^ Right on, OP! smile
May 17, 2012 6:44 AM
QUOTE:

I just made an awesome banana-quinoa-cashew quick bread that was only 108 calories per serving :)


omg, this sounds amazing, I want the recipe!
  6892961
May 17, 2012 11:26 AM
I have been a vegetarian since 1995.....I am always looking for more vegetarian friends!
  20502704
May 17, 2012 11:37 AM
QUOTE:

I've been a vegetarian for five years now. I have my own pet free range chickens so I have LOTS of eggs! :)


I want a pet chicken so bad, but I live in the city :-(
May 17, 2012 12:33 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I've been a vegetarian for five years now. I have my own pet free range chickens so I have LOTS of eggs! :)


I want a pet chicken so bad, but I live in the city :-(


They are so much fun! (although I have a sick one right now, circling the drain.. that tends to make me sad... =()..

As for 'labels', I don't care what folks call themselves. The ONLY reason that it kinda bugs me when someone eating fish calls themselves a vegetarian is at restaurants - seems all restaurants think vegetarians eat fish because of that. Even when you say 'no meat', that doesn't seem to ever mean fish to them. :P But I don't eat out much, so it's all good! =)

Other than that, who cares? If we are so rigid it doesn't come across well to others - I've seen on another veggie forum posts from people who 'accidentally' ate meat and had to run out and vomit. I'm sorry, that's just silly. LOL. If I accidentally ate meat, I just shrug and move on. It hasn't happened yet (that I know of, but probably will at some point) ..No one is perfect! =) I've also seen folks 'morally opposed' to 'faux meat' because it's no different than eating the real thing.. eh?

I'd never be a good vegan because my happy chicken eggs are yummy. And I buy local people's honey and occasional free range/grass fed milk products. But I respect those who choose that path.
Edited by fuzzyslipperz On May 17, 2012 12:34 PM
May 17, 2012 12:35 PM
vegetarian for almost 10 years, feel free to add me. i have lots of recipes if you would like, you can substitute any of the dairy and egg for the vegan products.
  18865958
May 17, 2012 12:36 PM
Vegan! :)
  19781976
May 17, 2012 12:37 PM
Hi, veggie eater here! No dairy, no eggs and no bananas, those things gross me out, lol!

Feel free to add me flowerforyou

Slainte!
Edited by Wilmingtonbelle On May 17, 2012 12:40 PM
  10144778
May 17, 2012 12:40 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Labels are like numbers on the scale. It indicates a general ball park, but is not an accurate measurement by any means. Most of the time, labels are just a source of unnecessary conflict!

I applaud everyone who eats vegan but on an odd day eats a slice of cheese. I applaud everyone vegetarian who sometimes just really wants a slice of bacon. I applaud everyone who eats fish but is not afraid to say he or she supports vegetarianism.

Animals, the environment, and your health benefit more from an imperfect long term commitment in the right direction, than a perfect short term commitment under the right label.

So forget labels, call yourself what you will, and eat what makes you feel good about your food. :)


^^^this!!!^^^ Right on, OP! smile


Yes, this. I eat a mostly plant-based diet, but I don't like labels at all. I think if someone eats a mostly plant-based diet and a litte fish, or has the occasional cheese pizza it isn't the end of the world. There are all sorts of plant-based diets and anyone who makes the effort helps the animals and the environment. So vegetarian, vegan, pescatarian...its all good to me.
  20988011
May 17, 2012 12:54 PM
I'm a lacto-ovo vegetarian, but I, too, get stuck in ruts with regards to mixing things up. I so need help finding simple and nutritious meals. Any of you 'seasoned' veggies who have found the panacea of variety in veggie cooking, please add me! And I'm always up for adding new friends here as well, so anyone else who wants to add me, feel free. :-)
May 17, 2012 12:54 PM
QUOTE:



Yes, this. I eat a mostly plant-based diet, but I don't like labels at all. I think if someone eats a mostly plant-based diet and a litte fish, or has the occasional cheese pizza it isn't the end of the world. There are all sorts of plant-based diets and anyone who makes the effort helps the animals and the environment. So vegetarian, vegan, pescatarian...its all good to me.


/agree!

on foods..

I'd give up most commercial dairy if someone could just come up with a vegan greek yogurt that actually has protein. Most of the vegan yogurts have hardly any protein (1-2g) and the consistency is 'meh'. Even tried making it myself with my own organic soymilk (I have a maker and a big bag of beans I'll never get through) - no dice.

I had some vegan cashew icecream in NYC a few months ago. OMG was that delicious!

Just had a P28 high protein bagel for (part of) dinner. Expensive but yummy.
May 17, 2012 1:01 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm mostly vegetarian (I eat fish, yogurt and the occasional egg) slowly transitioning to veganism just by making more vegan meals and dishes. I just made an awesome banana-quinoa-cashew quick bread that was only 108 calories per serving :)


This would make you a pescatarian, not a "mostly vegetarian", as there is no such thing. :-)


Thank you, I appreciate your opinion, but I think "mostly vegetarian" describes my diet just fine :) I'm actually mostly vegan. Most days, I don't consume any animal products. I'm not morally opposed to eating seafood and do so about two or three times per month, but 80+ meals per month are entirely plant-based and often free of animal products altogether.

Not everyone means "vegetarian" to describe a political identity.

I also don't recommend soy-based meat substitutes, as for the most part, they're loaded with sugar, sodium and preservatives to make them taste edible. If you're looking for extra protein, I recommend experimenting with legumes and whole soy products such as tempeh, tofu, edamame and soy nuts. Organic and GMO-free only, though! But that's just me.



being vegetarian isn't a political identity. Hitler was a vegetarian and didn't use his diet as a means of gaining political standing or kudos. Being a vegetarian is a a lifestyle choice..I don't see how it makes people 'political.


Hitler was not a vegetarian. He never stopped eating meat. His favorite dishes were roast squab and sausages. Vegetarian meals were a medical prescription for stomach problems at the time. He ate "less meat" which historians have incorrectly labelled as vegetarian, and the myth has prospered as an easy slam on vegetarians.
Edited by carld256 On May 17, 2012 1:24 PM
  8487736
May 17, 2012 1:10 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm mostly vegetarian (I eat fish, yogurt and the occasional egg) slowly transitioning to veganism just by making more vegan meals and dishes. I just made an awesome banana-quinoa-cashew quick bread that was only 108 calories per serving :)


This would make you a pescatarian, not a "mostly vegetarian", as there is no such thing. :-)


Thank you, I appreciate your opinion, but I think "mostly vegetarian" describes my diet just fine :) I'm actually mostly vegan. Most days, I don't consume any animal products. I'm not morally opposed to eating seafood and do so about two or three times per month, but 80+ meals per month are entirely plant-based and often free of animal products altogether.

Not everyone means "vegetarian" to describe a political identity.

I also don't recommend soy-based meat substitutes, as for the most part, they're loaded with sugar, sodium and preservatives to make them taste edible. If you're looking for extra protein, I recommend experimenting with legumes and whole soy products such as tempeh, tofu, edamame and soy nuts. Organic and GMO-free only, though! But that's just me.


From Webster:
veg·e·tar·i·an   [vej-i-tair-ee-uhn]
noun
a person who does not eat or does not believe in eating meat, fish, fowl, or, in some cases, any food derived from animals, as eggs or cheese, but subsists on vegetables, fruits, nuts, grain, etc.

pes·ca·tar·i·an \ˌpe-skə-ˈter-ē-ən\
noun
: one whose diet includes fish but no meat

And, by the way, Quorn products do not contain soy. Please do your research before you respond to a post.


who cares... why are we being so critical here.. its not really that important... is it?????
May 17, 2012 1:47 PM
It is important to me to deliniate between the 2, because as fuzzyslipperz stated, this causes issues for me in restaurants. Many items will be labeled "vegetarian" when they contain some sort of fish (or God forbid, poultry!) product. This is not only misleading to true vegetarians like myself, but also to the rest of the world. The carnivores of the world get confused by what true vegetarianism is because of these willy-nilly labels like "mostly vegetarian", "almost vegetarian", etc. That's just like being "a little bit pregnant". You either are or you're not. End of story.

I don't care what you or anyone else eats. If you're not a vegetarian, so what. Be proud of who you are and don't try to mislead people into thinking you're something that you're not. There's no special club. You won't get any special privileges. If you are a vegetarian, be proud. If you're a pescatarian, be proud. I personally am proud to be a vegetarian.

Stepping down off my soap box now.
May 17, 2012 4:31 PM
QUOTE:

It is important to me to deliniate between the 2, because as fuzzyslipperz stated, this causes issues for me in restaurants. Many items will be labeled "vegetarian" when they contain some sort of fish (or God forbid, poultry!) product. This is not only misleading to true vegetarians like myself, but also to the rest of the world. The carnivores of the world get confused by what true vegetarianism is because of these willy-nilly labels like "mostly vegetarian", "almost vegetarian", etc. That's just like being "a little bit pregnant". You either are or you're not. End of story.

I don't care what you or anyone else eats. If you're not a vegetarian, so what. Be proud of who you are and don't try to mislead people into thinking you're something that you're not. There's no special club. You won't get any special privileges. If you are a vegetarian, be proud. If you're a pescatarian, be proud. I personally am proud to be a vegetarian.

Stepping down off my soap box now.


No,stay on the soap box..this is EXACTLY RIGHT. As a vegetarian, I reject COUNTLESS dishes in restaurants when I ask if they contain fish oils, meat stock etc..all of these dishes marked as ' Vegetarian'. Being a'Vegetarian' is NOT THE SAME as someone who is *mostly* vegetarian and enjoys eating fish or a steak at christmas. There is absolutely nothing wrong with people who choose to eat less meat, but you are NOT a vegetarian.
  6593535
May 17, 2012 4:48 PM
The restaurant defense is so tiresome. Saying something about mostly vegetarian to indicate that your food diary would be of interest to the OP is a lot different than going into an eatery and saying, "I am a vegetarian and I will order the salmon!".

That said, my BFF swears by the veganomicon. She's always making stuff from that book and raving over it. Plus a lot of the recipes are already in MFP. I am pesca, and most of the time fish is unseen in my diary, so you can add me if you want to someone really take down a lot of peanut butter.

I also love seitan-tvp mixtures as the most delicious of meat substitutes. Making fakemeats at home eliminates the junkiness of them and usually you can get them to be tastier... unless they originally contained msg, then good luck.
May 17, 2012 7:11 PM
I'm vegetarian! Not vegan - I will eat eggs, milk, cheese - although I do limit all these things a LOT. I don't want to go vegan just because I feel it would be difficult - I mean, no baked goods, I could never order pizza, I dunno just things like that. I don't do them much but it would be so inconvenient if I'm with friends or coworkers and stuff.

Anyway.

BEANS! Chickpeas - oh my gosh soooo many recipes with chickpeas! Rice, almonds, that will help get protein (although not too many almonds! they are high in calories ... I usually eat just 5 in a day). I've been eating a ridiculous amount of veggies lately aha. A lot of veggies and beans, really.
May 17, 2012 7:51 PM
I eat a local, seasonal diet which is more vegetarian than not. I make everything from scratch. you can add me if you want, but my diary is open if you just feel like peeking in every once in a while

also the last week or so has been all kinds of salad because we harvested 2lbs of lettuce from the garden which needed to be eaten. it's not normally this salad-heavy.
Edited by kayemme On May 17, 2012 7:53 PM

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