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TOPIC: Water retention from exercise? (Trainers?)

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May 3, 2012 6:11 AM
Does anyone have the scale go up when they are working out? I've been dropping about 1-2 lbs a week for the last four weeks and I restarted 30 DS Monday (I haven't worked out in about five weeks or so) and the scale always goes up when I start working out. I haven't been consistant for a long enough period of time to see if this goes away, is this water retention? Does anyone else deal with this from working out? How long before it goes away? I think i'm going to see a gain at weigh in tomorrow.
  12731450
May 3, 2012 6:26 AM
Yes... I am not a trainer but I know that as your muscles work to repair themselves they hold onto water.
  4316539
May 3, 2012 6:33 AM
As your body gets used to the activity, it will go away. Can sometimes take a week at first, depending on your activity level and what you're doing but as you become more fit, it should only take a day or two. Make sure you're drinking plenty of water, especially on your active days, as a more constant hydration level will help to let your body know it's ok to release the excess.

Here's the thing though, as you continue to exercise, you also need to continue to challenge yourself in order to get the same (or better) calorie burn going forward so you'll keep seeing these periods where you might gain a bit or at least stay the same due to the muscles retaining fluid. It's part of becoming healthier so you just need to accept it for what it is. If you're in a challenge or program and have a specific weigh in day, maybe just take the day before as a rest day to allow your body to release those fluids so hopefully it won't effect that number on the scale.

When I was in WW, I had weigh ins on Tuesday so I'd rest or stick to strictly cardio (typically long walks) on the weekends and rest on Monday. It seemed to help...
Edited by MinnieInMaine On May 3, 2012 6:34 AM
  5367199
May 3, 2012 6:33 AM
Yep - always. as CarrieBear says, your muscles need to repair themselves so hold water. I worked my butt off yesterday - nearly 2000 cals burnt and i gained 4lbs today - I'm not even stressing as I know it's water, plus I drank 17 glasses of water yesterday too.

don't stress - keep drinking plenty of water to help flush it away and it'll be gone in a couple of days. x
  14461767
May 3, 2012 6:48 AM
Right now I'm doing 30DS and I was doing weight watchers but I find MFP easier to log and more user friendly. I think I'm going to just stick to this. But I really want to stick to it this time and change for good. Not something short term. I'm okay with going up a couple punds if it means I'm changing for the better. Just want to know what to expect.
  12731450
May 3, 2012 6:49 AM
Exercise will cause water retention but not stop weight loss.
  15809555
May 3, 2012 6:58 AM
QUOTE:

Exercise will cause water retention but not stop weight loss.


But the scale will show a temp gain?
  12731450
May 3, 2012 6:59 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Exercise will cause water retention but not stop weight loss.


But the scale will show a temp gain?
YES.
On days when I ski I'll burn like 1500 calories and scale will go up.
May 3, 2012 8:36 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Exercise will cause water retention but not stop weight loss.


But the scale will show a temp gain?
YES.
On days when I ski I'll burn like 1500 calories and scale will go up.


An intense workout, especially one with weight-lifting, can cause the body to retain water because water is attending to those muscles that are working overtime. Strengthening muscles or muscles that have been pulled or torn are areas where water travels to in order to heal.

Strength training causes microscopic tears in your muscle fibers. When these tears heal, the body rebuilds the muscles stronger than before. After a tough workout, blood rushes to the affected muscles to provide the nutrients that they need for recovery and to clear lactic acid and other cellular waste. The extra fluid causes muscles to become inflamed.

Post-workout swelling usually begins almost immediately after a workout and can last three to seven days
Edited by Matt_Wild On May 3, 2012 8:37 AM
  15809555
May 3, 2012 8:54 AM
2 days after my first session w/ PT, still sore as **** and my weight has been up. Haven't even really been worried though. :D

Great post Matt, ty.
May 3, 2012 8:56 AM
interesting Matt.

Im on week 2 of nrolfw and have seen about a 2 lb gain.

So I may just have to wait until the end of stage 1 (4 weeks from now) to see any drop in lbs?
  14475471
May 3, 2012 9:19 AM
Laws of physics dictate energy cannot be created, only transferred. If you are taking in less calories than your body is taking it, it will take it from stored fat. It'd be impossible to create weight beyond water being retained from intake then into muscle after exercise. Remember blood and indeed muscle is 70% water. An inflamed muscle, will hold more.
  15809555
May 15, 2012 3:12 PM
Bump: Help. How long do you retain water for? I've been doing intense workouts, 65 min high cardio (heart rate 140-170 for the whole hour - its a good hard workout) and strength combined by cranking up the resistance on the stepper. After that I add a 30-45 min yoga cool down. Just started adding in an extra 20 min of wieght lifting in before the yoga cool down.
I have been doing this 5 or 6 days a week for one month and not seen a drop in weight (gained 4 pounds) or looser clothes (tighter from muscle gain?). I'm counting and measuring everything, and am averaging a net loss of 6500 to 7200 cal per week (intense daily work outs and eating apprx 1300 cal per day - 5'5" girl, 210 pounds). I drink about 2 litres of water per day, 80% of calories from veggies (60/20 split between veggie carbs like broccolli and starchy carbs like bread), 10-20% remainder is meats, nuts, fats, ect). Getting very discouraged - with everything I have read I appear to be defying the laws of physic's. Could sodium possibly be causing that much water retention? HELP.
May 15, 2012 3:14 PM
I swear there was just a post explaining this yesterday.

Found it: http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/595473-why-the-scale-goes-up-with-a-new-workout-program-must-read?hl=scale+exercise&page=5#posts-8554010
Edited by tattooyu On May 15, 2012 3:15 PM
  18133233
May 15, 2012 3:21 PM
Another great article on water retention - and why you have to "ride out" any weight fluctuations....

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/adjusting-the-diet.html
  6365234
May 15, 2012 7:55 PM
What excellent informative articles you have provided. Thanks u all :)
Edited by Dudagarcia On May 15, 2012 7:55 PM
May 16, 2012 4:33 AM
QUOTE:

Bump: Help. How long do you retain water for? I've been doing intense workouts, 65 min high cardio (heart rate 140-170 for the whole hour - its a good hard workout) and strength combined by cranking up the resistance on the stepper. After that I add a 30-45 min yoga cool down. Just started adding in an extra 20 min of wieght lifting in before the yoga cool down.
I have been doing this 5 or 6 days a week for one month and not seen a drop in weight (gained 4 pounds) or looser clothes (tighter from muscle gain?). I'm counting and measuring everything, and am averaging a net loss of 6500 to 7200 cal per week (intense daily work outs and eating apprx 1300 cal per day - 5'5" girl, 210 pounds). I drink about 2 litres of water per day, 80% of calories from veggies (60/20 split between veggie carbs like broccolli and starchy carbs like bread), 10-20% remainder is meats, nuts, fats, ect). Getting very discouraged - with everything I have read I appear to be defying the laws of physic's. Could sodium possibly be causing that much water retention? HELP.


You need to eat more. My girlfriend is 5'1", <120 pounds, and eats more than you do and she works out less. 1300 calories is basically an insult to your body and it is going to clean to everything if you're not fueling it. You should look for the "Eat More Weigh Less" group here:

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/groups/home/3817-eat-more-to-weigh-less
May 16, 2012 4:37 AM
Not a trainer here but I do the same thing. My calves especially, and sometimes they will measure an inch bigger. After 2 days it's gone though.
  15245486
May 16, 2012 4:39 AM
bump to read later..
  6211992
May 16, 2012 4:42 AM
being you havent worked out in 5 weeks , you may not see a gain on the scale , you have probably accumulated a lot of water weight from eating cabs and sugars. I think the scale will either stay the same for a day then drop , but that is my body after a week of rest
May 16, 2012 5:26 AM
Thanks for the info, guys! I'm going to refer to this the next time I get frustrated...
May 16, 2012 6:31 AM
QUOTE:

Another great article on water retention - and why you have to "ride out" any weight fluctuations....

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/adjusting-the-diet.html


This is an excellent article. Thank you for posting this!
May 16, 2012 6:37 AM
One more post for comparison: On Monday morning I weighed in at 141.8 ...I upped my milage on my run and experienced some brutal muscle fatigue...On Tuesday and Wednesday (today) I weigh 144.0 lbs w/o no dietary explanations. But when I drop again (usually on weekends) I will go lower than the previous weekend. Oh and my measurements go up a tick too...

I know usually when I stop gaining weight after a run, I need to bump up the milage again....
  7205953
May 16, 2012 6:56 AM
Perfect explanations, and I was looking for these today. Started 30 DS Monday, feels like every one of my muscles, even ones I didn't know I had, are killing me....and had a 1 lb gain on the scale today. I have been running on the treadmill since January, so I didn't think I was totally out of shape, but good ole Jillian sure did prove me wrong. Thanks for the info everyone!
May 16, 2012 6:59 AM
Thanks for posting this! I had the same questions, and will be thrilled to review all the answers, too.
  17545953

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