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TOPIC: Do you weigh your meat before or after you cook it?

 
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April 25, 2012 3:15 PM
For example, the package on the chicken breasts I have says a serving size is four ounces, 110 calories. Is that before or after cooking?
April 25, 2012 3:29 PM
If it's the label on raw meat- then it's pre-cooked weight.

the only time I really use cooked weight is with ground beef because I drain and rinse it :)
April 25, 2012 3:33 PM
I've always assumed MFP numbers were after cooking for meat.
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April 25, 2012 3:45 PM
I've always done it after cooking it because i dont want to put raw meat on my scale and because I'm cooking it together with my families dinner.
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April 25, 2012 4:12 PM
I do it after. But I agree, I think the calorie count on the package is unprepared. But if it shrinks, then it's water loss, right? Do some of the nutrients get lost, or more compact? I always wondered the same thing. But then, it doesn't shrink THAT much, does it? We're probably talking a small difference in size anyway, meaning a small difference in calories. Sucks for those of us that try to be as exact as possible. I feel the same way, but opposite, about pasta. Did it get 2 times bigger? Or 3? That can be a pretty big difference. I always keep one dry noodle out and then compare them after cooked. Gah! Gets so confusing sometimes!! LOL


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April 25, 2012 4:16 PM
I use before always.

Also, if you don't want to put raw meat on the scale, use a piece of plastic, a tupperware container, etc. I weigh most of my food on a melamine plate used solely for weighing raw meat.
April 25, 2012 8:44 PM
QUOTE:

I do it after. But I agree, I think the calorie count on the package is unprepared. But if it shrinks, then it's water loss, right? Do some of the nutrients get lost, or more compact? I always wondered the same thing. But then, it doesn't shrink THAT much, does it? We're probably talking a small difference in size anyway, meaning a small difference in calories. Sucks for those of us that try to be as exact as possible. I feel the same way, but opposite, about pasta. Did it get 2 times bigger? Or 3? That can be a pretty big difference. I always keep one dry noodle out and then compare them after cooked. Gah! Gets so confusing sometimes!! LOL


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I've actually measured out the difference with pasta...at least with spaghetti. If it weighed 2 oz. before it was cooked, it weighs 5 oz. after. So basically 2.5 times heavier. Haha. With the chicken breast last night I cooked up 8 oz. raw and when it was done being cooked it was 5 oz. (Some weird part of my brain likes investigating these numbers.)

Thanks for the advice everyone, from now on I'm going with the packaged weight being the "before" weight...I usually do that anyway but it's good to know that there is actually a difference.
Edited by runningfromzombies On April 25, 2012 8:45 PM

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