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TOPIC: How to lose weight correctly.

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April 10, 2012 7:17 AM
There are so many people and plateau's, people struggling to lose weight. It's really very simple. People just make it too complicated, for what reason? i don't know. I'll right these out in rules.

1. Know your maintenance calories.
Not from some goofy formula from webpages, but actually test it yourself. A very simple method is multiply your weight by

Sedentary 10-11
Lightly active 11-12
Moderately active 12-13
Very active 14-15
Extremely active 18-19

Eat at that level till you stop losing or gaining weight. Before I forget, this method you don't need to worry about eating back your calories.

Purpose
To make sure you're eating enough calories. This is a big reason people stall out, they just don't eat enough. Food has a thermogenic effect, what this means it increases body temperature because as assimilation requires energy. The more food you consume the more energy your body will produce in terms of heat production. Heat production is a byproduct of calorie burn. The more food you eat the more calories you burn, literally. The less you eat the less calories you burn. Use food to your advantage. if you don't eat enough food your body will perceive this and slow down your metabolic rate. It does this by a few methods, but one method is stripping of muscle which will slow down your metabolic rate. It will also slow down metabolic rate via thyroid function. You have 3 things working against you if your calories are to low. Lower muscle mass, slowed metabolic rate by the thyroid, and a low thermogenic effect of food. Food keeps the body working optimally.

2. Create a deficit.
Once you found your maintenance calories. Subtract 10-15%.

Purpose
This is a small deficit, it's not big enough to trigger the issues I listed above.

3. How quickly should you lose?
I like lyle's approach to this. He divides people in to categories based on body fat percentage.

Men Categories
Category 1: less than 15% bodyfat.
Category 2: 16-25% bodyfat
Category 3: 26 > bodyfat

Women Categories
Category 1: Less than 24% bodyfat.
Category 2: 25-35% bodyfat
Category 3: 35% > bodyfat.

You should lose about 1-1.5lbs a week. This is not based on weekly weigh ins, it's based on 2-3 week weigh ins. If you don't lose about 3.0 - 4.5lbs in 3 weeks. You reduce your calorie intake by 10%. If you're losing more than this increase your calories by 10%. People in category 2 and 3 and shoot for about 2lbs loss a week. People in category 1 should shoot for 1lbs a week.

TDEE + 3500

4. Carbs and more carbs
The most critical macro nutrient is protein. You should consume about 1g of protein per pound of Lean body mass. I like the ratio 50% protein 25% fat 25% carbs. This is just a starting point, these ratios aren't necessary at all. I don't care what your macros are as long as you get about 1g of protein per pound of lean body mass. You will find optimal carb levels for yourself eventually, so whatever method you choose doesn't matter. The 10-15% deficit listed above should come from carbs if you're not losing weight. If you do low carb and not losing. Carbs are important for thyroid regulation(low carb diets slow down your thyroid function). So I wouldn't cut them out completely. If you're one of those ketosis people, I kind of am. You should do something similar to CKD(cylical ketosis diet) to prevent thyroid problems. This just involves low carb for 5 days, 2 days of high carbs. That's all.

5. Get your rest
Every 3 months take a week off. This will restore your hormonal levels to some degree. Help your body grow and get stronger after those 3 months. results are a 2 part equation, rest and recovery. Make sure you get your rest. The people who are in a plateau who exercise a ton, this is why... you're not recovering properly. and more than likely not eating enough as well. Food is needed for recovery.

6. If it ain't TDEE+3500 it ain't fat bro
This is my buddy's razi's quote i love it. It's so true. You gain a pound in a week, or 2lbs in week and people panic. To gain a pound you have to eat at your maintaince + 3500 calories, to gain 2lbs you need to eat 7000 calories. If your maintenance calories is about 2000 calories and you gain 2lbs in a week. Do the math. 7 days per week.
2000 * 7 = 14000, plus the 2lbs = 7,0000. This means you ate 21,000 calories in a week to gain those 2lbs. If you didn't eat what the math tells you, ITS JUST WATER stop stressing.

I recently got off a really intensive program, weight shoot up 7lbs in 2 days. It was just from lack of carbs in my system, now since i increased them my muscles got full of glycogen and water. The scale is a poor method to gauge success.

Summary
Step 1.Find your maintenance
Step 2.Lose weight at a optimal pace 1.5lbs a week +10% or -10% (from carbs)
Step 3.Get your rest
Step 4. If you're stuck read step 1.

not rocket science.
Edited by Pu_239 On April 10, 2012 7:22 AM
  11390926
April 10, 2012 7:21 AM
QUOTE:



6. If it ain't TDEE+3500 it ain't fat brot
This is my buddy's razi's quote i love it. It's so true. You gain a pound in a week, or 2lbs in week and people panic. To gain a pound you have to eat at your maintaince + 3500 calories, to gain 2lbs you need to eat 7000 calories. If your maintenance calories is about 2000 calories and you gain 2lbs in a week. Do the math. 7 days per week.
2000 * 7 = 14000, plus the 2lbs = 7,0000. This means you ate 21,000 calories in a week to gain those 2lbs. If you didn't eat what the math tells you, ITS JUST WATER stop stressing.



Nice!

Thanks for posting.
  18118360
April 10, 2012 7:22 AM
You should write a book.
April 10, 2012 7:23 AM
Your formula for finding maintenance gives me a figure that's way too low... more like my BMR. Are you sure that's right?
April 10, 2012 7:23 AM
QUOTE:

You should write a book.

Totally Agree!
April 10, 2012 7:24 AM
QUOTE:

Your formula for finding maintenance gives me a figure that's way too low... more like my BMR. Are you sure that's right?


Use the higher values...
  11390926
April 10, 2012 7:25 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:



6. If it ain't TDEE+3500 it ain't fat brot
This is my buddy's razi's quote i love it. It's so true. You gain a pound in a week, or 2lbs in week and people panic. To gain a pound you have to eat at your maintaince + 3500 calories, to gain 2lbs you need to eat 7000 calories. If your maintenance calories is about 2000 calories and you gain 2lbs in a week. Do the math. 7 days per week.
2000 * 7 = 14000, plus the 2lbs = 7,0000. This means you ate 21,000 calories in a week to gain those 2lbs. If you didn't eat what the math tells you, ITS JUST WATER stop stressing.



Nice!

Thanks for posting.


^^this
April 10, 2012 7:27 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Your formula for finding maintenance gives me a figure that's way too low... more like my BMR. Are you sure that's right?


Use the higher values...

I used the higher value for sedentary, which is what I am. I have seen formulas that find your BMR with those numbers, then multiply by 1.2 to get TDEE.
April 10, 2012 7:27 AM
Great post man ;-)
ain't fat BRO!
April 10, 2012 7:28 AM
I am kind of in a rush, i forgot to say this. A big thing is to be patient, finding your maintenance might take a few weeks. But once you know it, weight loss should come at a good pace and consistently. take the time to find it, if you don't you might be struggling for a while.
  11390926
April 10, 2012 7:29 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Your formula for finding maintenance gives me a figure that's way too low... more like my BMR. Are you sure that's right?


Use the higher values...

I used the higher value for sedentary, which is what I am. I have seen formulas that find your BMR with those numbers, then multiply by 1.2 to get TDEE.

Use the moderate or active... once again these are just generalizations, your TRUE maintenance is what you have to find... through experimentation
  11390926
April 10, 2012 7:29 AM
QUOTE:

Great post man ;-)
ain't fat BRO!


If it ain't TDEE + 3500 it ain't fat bro...
  11390926
April 10, 2012 7:30 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Your formula for finding maintenance gives me a figure that's way too low... more like my BMR. Are you sure that's right?


Use the higher values...

I used the higher value for sedentary, which is what I am. I have seen formulas that find your BMR with those numbers, then multiply by 1.2 to get TDEE.

Use the moderate or active... once again these are just generalizations, your TRUE maintenance is what you have to find... through experimentation

But what I'm saying is, if I didn't already KNOW what my maintenance is, I would have used sedentary and gotten a number that was way too low. And I really don't think I'm a freak with a high metabolism. So I'm not sure how useful your formula is.
April 10, 2012 7:33 AM
BUMP!
  18473060
April 10, 2012 7:34 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Your formula for finding maintenance gives me a figure that's way too low... more like my BMR. Are you sure that's right?


Use the higher values...

I used the higher value for sedentary, which is what I am. I have seen formulas that find your BMR with those numbers, then multiply by 1.2 to get TDEE.

Use the moderate or active... once again these are just generalizations, your TRUE maintenance is what you have to find... through experimentation

But what I'm saying is, if I didn't already KNOW what my maintenance is, I would have used sedentary and gotten a number that was way too low. And I really don't think I'm a freak with a high metabolism. So I'm not sure how useful your formula is.


Why do you think you're sedentary, do you have higher than average muscle mass? If you didn't know your maintenance like you said and you picked sedentary, you'd be losing weight, so you would increase your calories by 10%... until you find the point you stop losing weight. As I said those methods aren't perfect, formulas are just a guideline not written in stone, that's why you need to find it for yourself.
  11390926
April 10, 2012 7:34 AM
QUOTE:

1. Know your maintenance calories.
Not from some goofy formula from webpages, but actually test it yourself. A very simple method is multiply your weight by

Sedentary 10-11
Lightly active 11-12
Moderately active 12-13
Very active 14-15
Extremely active 18-19



I'm a little confused by this. You say not to use a "goofy formula from webpages", then proceed to give an even goofier formula. The BMR calculator on MFP is about as good as it gets without knowing your exact body fat percentage or getting a calorimeter test at a clinic, etc.
  15912463
April 10, 2012 7:40 AM
QUOTE:

I'm a little confused by this. You say not to use a "goofy formula from webpages", then proceed to give an even goofier formula. The BMR calculator on MFP is about as good as it gets without knowing your exact body fat percentage or getting a calorimeter test at a clinic, etc.


Better choice of words would have been "complicated" rather than goofy. The formulas he listed are much easier to calculate and serve as a very general "starting point" for people to get a handle on their maintenance.
April 10, 2012 7:42 AM
Awesome post.
April 10, 2012 7:42 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm a little confused by this. You say not to use a "goofy formula from webpages", then proceed to give an even goofier formula. The BMR calculator on MFP is about as good as it gets without knowing your exact body fat percentage or getting a calorimeter test at a clinic, etc.


Better choice of words would have been "complicated" rather than goofy. The formulas he listed are much easier to calculate and serve as a very general "starting point" for people to get a handle on their maintenance.


True, though the MFP website takes all the work out of it by calculating things for you. Just enter your gender, age and weight and click the button. Then multiply that by the usual numbers (1.2 for Sedentary, etc) to figure out the TDEE, which is just as much work as multiplying your weight by a different number, as the OP suggested.
  15912463
April 10, 2012 7:46 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm a little confused by this. You say not to use a "goofy formula from webpages", then proceed to give an even goofier formula. The BMR calculator on MFP is about as good as it gets without knowing your exact body fat percentage or getting a calorimeter test at a clinic, etc.


Better choice of words would have been "complicated" rather than goofy. The formulas he listed are much easier to calculate and serve as a very general "starting point" for people to get a handle on their maintenance.


True, though the MFP website takes all the work out of it by calculating things for you. Just enter your gender, age and weight and click the button. Then multiply that by the usual numbers (1.2 for Sedentary, etc) to figure out the TDEE, which is just as much work as multiplying your weight by a different number, as the OP suggested.


I haven't actually done this on MFP so I can't comment, but based on other peoples intake values it seems to me that MFP tends to under-estimate since it expects you to eat back exercise calories and TDEE values are exercise-inclusive outside of MFP.

But having said that, I'll take the time to try it out and see what it guesses my TDEE at.
April 10, 2012 7:46 AM
One question - why only a 10% deficit?

The most recommended percentage I've seen is 20%
  14463414
April 10, 2012 7:47 AM
QUOTE:


6. If it ain't TDEE+3500 it ain't fat brot
This is my buddy's razi's quote i love it. It's so true. You gain a pound in a week, or 2lbs in week and people panic. To gain a pound you have to eat at your maintaince + 3500 calories, to gain 2lbs you need to eat 7000 calories. If your maintenance calories is about 2000 calories and you gain 2lbs in a week. Do the math. 7 days per week.
2000 * 7 = 14000, plus the 2lbs = 7,0000. This means you ate 21,000 calories in a week to gain those 2lbs. If you didn't eat what the math tells you, ITS JUST WATER stop stressing.



I don't quite get this. How did we all get fat in the first place? If you have to eat that many calories to gain a couple of pounds of fat.
  17702099
April 10, 2012 7:48 AM
bump
April 10, 2012 7:48 AM
bump
April 10, 2012 7:49 AM
Thanks ! Nice info.
  18494522

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