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TOPIC: Benefits of lifting low weight / high reps

 
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March 9, 2012 6:15 AM
QUOTE:

So, what some of you are saying is if you can't lift heavy due to medical restrictions then don't bother as anything less than a ton of weight won't do any damn good, I will pass that along to my doctor who is very knowledgeable about weight lifting and up on the latest scientific literature and she told me I could not exceed 40 lbs or risk more surgery but to up my reps and i would still benefit. So you are saying she doesn't have any idea what she's talking about, lol. I will definitely pass that along and stay the hell away from all weights.


No one is talking about people with special medical requirements.
  13657057
March 9, 2012 6:16 AM
But if I eat the heavy weights repetitiously I will lengthen my bones and leanify my bulk, yes?
  16759415
March 9, 2012 6:16 AM
bump..... interested as well.....
March 9, 2012 6:16 AM
QUOTE:

I've heard that lifting light weights with more reps is better for muscle definition and fat loss -- versus building muscle and bulking up which is what you would get with heavy weights. I myself go with the lighter wieghts with more reps cause I want a slender toned look. I already have pretty thick thighs and upper arms so I don't want to bulk them up anymore!


That is an old myth, low reps high weight is not good for definition vs heavy weights. You will not bulk up unless you are in a caloric surplus and training to get bigger (it does not happen by accident)
March 9, 2012 6:18 AM
QUOTE:

But if I eat the heavy weights repetitiously I will lengthen my bones and leanify my bulk, yes?


No but you'll set off the alarm at airport security.
  13657057
March 9, 2012 6:19 AM
QUOTE:

My goal is to lift heavy.
As much as I can manage for 8-10 reps.

I keep getting recommendations from people (like my chiropractor) to lift less weight, and do higher reps.

what would be the benefit of light weights/more reps as opposed to lifting heavy?


This is what Heavy lifting does for you - you gain lbs but look so much better!

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Edited by ladyraven68 On March 9, 2012 7:11 AM
  14463414
March 9, 2012 6:24 AM
QUOTE:

I started heavy lifting at the rack 3 weeks ago, and I'll never go back. In three weeks, I feel stronger, my workout shorts are getting very loose (losing inches obviously), and my mental health is at it's peak. Endorphins are freaking awesome.

I had been doing lots of squats and lunges, etc before heading to the bars, but since i've been lifting HEAVY with the bars I feel like a new person. I'm not kidding you. I love going to the gym like never before.

Women, if you go to the gym, you MUST TRY IT. You will NOT bulk, and you'll notice your stomach trimming out just by using that freaking bar! You work your core with every exercise. JUST DO IT!


I would love for you to expand on your bar workouts! I have been doing a sculpting book and am lifting heavier but would love something new to get some great results.
March 9, 2012 6:27 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

But if I eat the heavy weights repetitiously I will lengthen my bones and leanify my bulk, yes?


No but you'll set off the alarm at airport security.


Hmmm, so I would no longer have to actually request the body cavity search...
  16759415
March 9, 2012 6:31 AM
QUOTE:

chiropractor? Well there's your first problem


Careful, allegedly they're known to sue if anyone alleges that they are quacks.
  11180573
March 9, 2012 6:35 AM
QUOTE:

Muscle Endurance.

Also lifting heavy doesn't create bulk in women esp in a deficit and EVEN at a surplus, ask my girl Rae. She gained 11 lbs and look tighter and leaner than she did before she start bulking.

I also never heard of figure competitors lifting low weights at high reps. They train heavy and hard to get that body.

Benefits of lifting heavy:

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/518789-the-difference-weight-lifting-makes


THANK YOU GIRL! I love that link and it is all so true. Man I wish I had pics of me 2 years ago when I just did cardio and a few "light" weights. I was 15 pounds lighter than I am now and only a size smaller. But now I am curvy, no cellulite, round butt, 6 packs, arms getting defined and legs are shapely.

I lift as heavy as I can. When I say heavy I mean as much weight as I can complete with good form for 6-8 reps. If you can push out more than 10 reps on any exercise you should increase the weight. If your Chiropractor says this bc he wants less strain on your back, I am guessing you need to build strength there. Start off light with squats, deadlifts, straightleg deadlifts (which have made my lower back muscles pop out like crazy), rows, and lat pull downs. Once you start to build enough strength in your back to increase the weight then do so. Most women have very little back strength and this can cause back pains.

Train in the 6-10 rep range. You will burn fat and build lean sexy muscle. Just dont eat too much!
March 9, 2012 6:37 AM
Dude with the chart showed it best - stay somewhere in the 6-12 reps range and all will be well. (12 really is the upper limit though)

Personally I go for 6-8. As soon as I can do 8 reps of something I up the weight so next time I can only do 6, then work up to 8. Rinse. Repeat.

Also - since this thread was more targeted at women - there will be no bulking.

When you see those beefy guys - they did heavy weights

When you see those toned girls with the flat stomachs and the bums like they should be in a Sloggi advert; they also did heavy weights.
Edited by chrishgt4 On March 9, 2012 6:38 AM
March 9, 2012 6:43 AM
-BUMP-
March 9, 2012 6:46 AM
Good information. I'm starting weights today so this thread was right on time. Thanks all!
March 9, 2012 6:48 AM
QUOTE:

From what I've read, low weights with high reps increases muscle endurance, but does not increase muscle. I'm no expert though and could be wrong :)


Yes, I think this is true. If you have not used the muscle in a while you will likely have an initial gain in muscle, but after that you'll just maintain it but increase endurance.
March 9, 2012 6:56 AM
In this thread: female broscience
March 9, 2012 6:57 AM
QUOTE:

In this thread: female broscience

femscience?
March 9, 2012 6:57 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

In this thread: female broscience

femscience?


hoscience??...no wait...lol
March 9, 2012 7:10 AM
I'll occasionally lift light weights/high reps to build my mental constitution since 100 reps on bench or squat of just the bar after heavy lifting burns like a ************, and I need a high tolerance for pain given the sports I enjoy. I'll also do BW calisthenics at high reps to prepare for the training my teachers will torture me with. Beyond specific scenarios like that I have found heavy lifting to provide substantially larger gains than light reps. I'm not going to bother with an explanation as people more knowledgeable than me have already posted quite a bit of solid material. Those are basically the reasons I lift the way I do.

If I had all the time in the world, I'd do a full routine of heavy lifting, and then burnout on light weight after to make sure I was completely dead (then I'd sleep for two days to recover). That's basically what I would do in college (I only did burnouts when I didn't have practice the next day) to fairly decent success. I don't, so most of the time I just lift heavy.

Health conditions permitting, I would strongly suggesting implementing a heavy lifting routine to at least judge its effectiveness first. If you are experiencing pain as a result of your lifting, decrease the weight and focus on your form while you build back up. Whether you're lifting 5 lbs or 500, form is DEFINITELY the most important thing.

As for why the chiropractor made that suggestion, I think that's something you should ask the chiro. We could speculate all day here as to why someone we've never met would suggest something. I think it was said because that'll mean you're out of the house longer and it'll leave ample time to break in and replace all of your Coke with Pepsi.
March 9, 2012 7:13 AM
QUOTE:

We could speculate all day here as to why someone we've never met would suggest something. I think it was said because that'll mean you're out of the house longer and it'll leave ample time to break in and replace all of your Coke with Pepsi.


Holy ****, why didn't I think of that??? Lizzy, I hope you have an alarm system; that damn chiro is trying to switch your stash!!
  8721504
March 9, 2012 7:14 AM
I can't believe the bulking issue still comes up.

Next time you are in the gym, walk around the weight section and look at all the 18-22 year old guys. They are literally* composed of 50% testosterone.
Guaranteed, they will be lifting heavy weights trying to show off as much as possible. You'll often see them benching well over 200lbs and squatting even more.

Do they look like bodybuilders? No. Not even close.

It takes YEARS and YEARS of serious training to "bulk". It doesn't happen by accident.


*not literally, don't flame me.
March 9, 2012 7:19 AM
QUOTE:

I can't believe the bulking issue still comes up.

Next time you are in the gym, walk around the weight section and look at all the 18-22 year old guys. They are literally* composed of 50% testosterone.
Guaranteed, they will be lifting heavy weights trying to show off as much as possible. You'll often see them benching well over 200lbs and squatting even more.

Do they look like bodybuilders? No. Not even close.

It takes YEARS and YEARS of serious training to "bulk". It doesn't happen by accident.


*not literally, don't flame me.


I'm imagining someone pressing enter at their computer and a giant spigot popping up and incinerating them...
March 9, 2012 7:21 AM
QUOTE:

It doesn't tone anything... that's a misnomer. The lighter the weight and the more reps you do, the more aerobic the exercise becomes. This increase oxygen uptake which increases cals burned. As a result (assuming a good diet), you shed more fat which exposes the EXISTING muscle underneath.



Was just wondering what you considered to be high reps to achieve this?

My trainer has me doing this or I should say wants me to start doing this, and wants reps of 20 to 25, currently I do 3 sets at around 15 reps (1st set 15 reps 2nd/3rd as close to as poss, when 3rd is to 15, I go up a weight), so I will need to drop my weight to achieve the 20, but is that to high?
Edited by MattBoySlim On March 9, 2012 7:22 AM
  16355770
March 9, 2012 7:24 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

It doesn't tone anything... that's a misnomer. The lighter the weight and the more reps you do, the more aerobic the exercise becomes. This increase oxygen uptake which increases cals burned. As a result (assuming a good diet), you shed more fat which exposes the EXISTING muscle underneath.



Was just wondering what you considered to be high reps to achieve this?

My trainer has me doing this or I should say wants me to start doing this, and wants reps of 20 to 25, currently I do 3 sets at around 15 reps (1st set 15 reps 2nd/3rd as close to as poss, when 3rd is to 15, I go up a weight), so I will need to drop my weight to achieve the 20, but is that to high?


Yes, too high. No reason to go over 12 reps, if you can do 12 reps with good form, increase the weight.
March 9, 2012 7:33 AM
personal trainers LOVE to have their clients do high reps.

It's not going to do all that much for the muscles though other than endurance (and maybe helping tendons get used to the motions).

It also keeps clients coming back for more. Why teach people that you only need 25 mins in the gym on your own.
March 9, 2012 7:35 AM
QUOTE:

I just wish the bulking myth would just go away...urgh

Also:

Lengthening muscles and "toning"" muscles...shudders


Haha:
"Why won't you die...!!"

I would LOVE for that myth to be busted once and for all. I still get people saying this to me, even trainers.. extremely annoying!

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