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TOPIC: Interesting info, CORN, Should we eat it?????

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February 24, 2012 9:37 AM
Is Corn Healthy or making you sick and overweight?
by Mike Geary, Certified Nutrition Specialist

Contrary to popular belief, corn is a grain, not a vegetable, and is really not appropriate as a dietary staple for several reasons:

1. The problems with "antinutrients" in corn (and other grains too)
2. The inflammatory aspect of excess omega-6 fats in corn products
3. The blood sugar disrupting nature of corn products.

When civilizations such as the Mayans and Native Americans changed their diet to a corn-based one, rates of anemia, arthritis, rickets, and osteoporosis skyrocketed.

Our bodies were not made to exist on such a high quantity of grain-based foods as is present in the modern western diet. This evidence shows up in the archeological records of our ancestors. When archaeologists looked at skeletons of native Americans in burial mounds in the Midwest who ate corn as their primary staple, there was a 50% increase in malnutrition, four times as much incidence of iron-deficiency, and three times as much infectious disease, compared to the more hunter-gather ancestors who primarily ate meats and fruits and veggies as opposed to grains.

Keep in mind that we are not just talking about corn-on-the-cob (sweet corn) here... we are also talking about corn cereals, corn chips, and other modern corn-based foods that are promoted by food companies as "healthy." There are several reasons researchers give for the nutritional problems and the weight gain caused by a corn-dominated diet:

• Corn contains lots of fast digesting starches and sugar, which raises insulin levels, causes you to be hungrier and causes your body to store calories as fat. Don’t be mistaken, just because corn does not taste obviously sweet, doesn’t mean it isn’t full of sugars. Once eaten, your body quickly turns corn based foods into sugar. Even the starches in corn products can be broken down very quickly by your body spiking your blood sugar levels, and causing cravings for more carbohydrate-based foods.

• Corn is also a poor source of protein, usually deficient in 3 of the 8 essential amino acids: lysine, isoleucine, and tryptophan. The essential amino acids are so-named because they must be obtained from the diet, since the body is unable to manufacture them.

• Corn contains a high amount of phytate, a chemical that binds to iron and inhibits its absorption by the body. So, consequently, a diet high in phytate can make people more likely to have iron-deficiency anemia and fatigue. Phytate is also a nutrient blocker (an antinutrient) and inhibits other vitamins and minerals from being utilized.

• Corn is a poor source of certain minerals such as calcium and some vitamins such as niacin (B3). Deficiencies of niacin can result in a condition known as Pellagra, which is common in civilizations that eat a lot of corn. It can cause a variety of symptoms such as dermatitis, diarrhea, and depression. Since we are now a nation of corn-eaters, it wouldn’t be surprising that this is more common here than we realize.

• Corn oils are also used in most processed foods (along with soybean oils). Both corn oil and soybean oil are excessively high in inflammatory omega-6 fats and low in anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats. This throws the delicate balance of omega-6 to omega-3 in your body out of whack and can cause degenerative diseases and weight gain over time. In addition, corn oil and soybean oil are highly refined with high heat and solvents, which oxidizes and damages the fragile polyunsaturated oils, and makes them even more inflammatory when you ingest them in processed foods.

It's not just people who eat too much corn based foods. A large amount of the nation's corn crop ends up feeding commercially raised cattle, which are cheaply fattened on corn and other grains before slaughter. Beef from corn-fattened cattle also has much higher ratios of inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids than healthier grass fed beef which contains more anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. Most meat in supermarkets comes from grain-fed animals and not healthy grass fed animals.

Because corn and other grains are an unnatural diet and difficult to digest, cattle raised on corn develop higher stomach acidity, which is a breeding ground for the dangerous E. coli O157:H7, the deadly strain of the bacteria. E-coli is rare in healthy grass-fed meat.

While eliminating refined grains such as corn and wheat (yes, it seems they are in everything!) can seem a very daunting task, the reward is a return to wonderful health, sparkling eyes, clear skin, clear thinking, and less body fat as the body is once again able to extract appropriate nutrients from food, reduced inflammation caused by grain based foods, and a resolution of nutritional deficiencies from the lack of absorption.

Do yourself a favor, and try at least 2 weeks with no grain products at all. I guarantee you will see some drastic improvements in your weight, energy, and general outlook! This is easier than you may think... For example, instead of having pasta with sauce and meat for dinner, a better alternative would be to have just grass-fed meat, tomato sauce, and veggies, topped with a little parmesan cheese. It’s delicious and no grains!

Another example would be breakfast... instead of cereals, bagels, or muffins, try to base most of your breakfasts on cage-free organic whole eggs with lots of veggies and perhaps some bison sausage or other nitrate/nitrite-free turkey or chicken sausage. If you're very active and need a little more carbs with your breakfast, instead of grains, a small piece of fruit or some tea with a little bit of raw honey can be great additions to the egg/veggies based breakfast. This is a delicious and satisfying breakfast that will control your blood sugar, balance your hormones, and eliminate the problems with antinutrients found in most grains. Those are just a couple examples, but I think you get the point of how easy this can be.

I know it may not be realistic for everybody to give up grains fully, so the most realistic plan for many people is to only eat grain based foods (bread, pasta, cereals, etc) on their one cheat day each week, and save 6 days per week to be grain-free. Your body with thank you!
February 24, 2012 9:44 AM
Sorry, but this is ridiculous. Don't eat this, don't eat that.. What the h*** are we supposed to eat?

FWIW, I'm diabetic and I eat corn. It dies nothing to spike my blood glucose. Of course, like anything else, moderation is important
February 24, 2012 9:44 AM
QUOTE:
Do yourself a favor, and try at least 2 weeks with no grain products at all. I guarantee you will see some drastic improvements in your weight, energy, and general outlook


Ah something you will often here from pro Paleo peeps, that you can improve body comp not by a cutting cals but because you eliminated the evil food, in this case grains.

The whole article misses the point of context, as with everything, grains are fine in moderation even with the acknowledgement of the effect of anti nutrients on mineral absorption. Interestingly enough whole grains contain a lot more anti nutrients then refined grains but supposedly they are the "good" carbs
February 24, 2012 9:47 AM
WTF is wrong with corn?
February 24, 2012 9:49 AM
I never eat anything that comes out looking the same way it went in
  9985438
February 24, 2012 9:50 AM
I'M SO OVER THESE TOPICS ABOUT EVERYTHING BEING AWFUL FOR YOU.

MODERATION, MODERATION, MODERATION.
  5669343
February 24, 2012 9:50 AM
I only eat things that are alive.
  11258693
February 24, 2012 9:50 AM
Corn is disgusting anyways, unless it's popped.
  14213622
February 24, 2012 9:51 AM
QUOTE:

I never eat anything that comes out looking the same way it went in


Soooo no chocolate cake for you? laugh
February 24, 2012 9:51 AM
QUOTE:

Is Corn Healthy or making you sick and overweight?
by Mike Geary, Certified Nutrition Specialist

Contrary to popular belief, corn is a grain, not a vegetable, and is really not appropriate as a dietary staple for several reasons:

1. The problems with "antinutrients" in corn (and other grains too)
2. The inflammatory aspect of excess omega-6 fats in corn products
3. The blood sugar disrupting nature of corn products.

When civilizations such as the Mayans and Native Americans changed their diet to a corn-based one, rates of anemia, arthritis, rickets, and osteoporosis skyrocketed.

Our bodies were not made to exist on such a high quantity of grain-based foods as is present in the modern western diet. This evidence shows up in the archeological records of our ancestors. When archaeologists looked at skeletons of native Americans in burial mounds in the Midwest who ate corn as their primary staple, there was a 50% increase in malnutrition, four times as much incidence of iron-deficiency, and three times as much infectious disease, compared to the more hunter-gather ancestors who primarily ate meats and fruits and veggies as opposed to grains.

Keep in mind that we are not just talking about corn-on-the-cob (sweet corn) here... we are also talking about corn cereals, corn chips, and other modern corn-based foods that are promoted by food companies as "healthy." There are several reasons researchers give for the nutritional problems and the weight gain caused by a corn-dominated diet:

• Corn contains lots of fast digesting starches and sugar, which raises insulin levels, causes you to be hungrier and causes your body to store calories as fat. Don’t be mistaken, just because corn does not taste obviously sweet, doesn’t mean it isn’t full of sugars. Once eaten, your body quickly turns corn based foods into sugar. Even the starches in corn products can be broken down very quickly by your body spiking your blood sugar levels, and causing cravings for more carbohydrate-based foods.

• Corn is also a poor source of protein, usually deficient in 3 of the 8 essential amino acids: lysine, isoleucine, and tryptophan. The essential amino acids are so-named because they must be obtained from the diet, since the body is unable to manufacture them.

• Corn contains a high amount of phytate, a chemical that binds to iron and inhibits its absorption by the body. So, consequently, a diet high in phytate can make people more likely to have iron-deficiency anemia and fatigue. Phytate is also a nutrient blocker (an antinutrient) and inhibits other vitamins and minerals from being utilized.

• Corn is a poor source of certain minerals such as calcium and some vitamins such as niacin (B3). Deficiencies of niacin can result in a condition known as Pellagra, which is common in civilizations that eat a lot of corn. It can cause a variety of symptoms such as dermatitis, diarrhea, and depression. Since we are now a nation of corn-eaters, it wouldn’t be surprising that this is more common here than we realize.

• Corn oils are also used in most processed foods (along with soybean oils). Both corn oil and soybean oil are excessively high in inflammatory omega-6 fats and low in anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats. This throws the delicate balance of omega-6 to omega-3 in your body out of whack and can cause degenerative diseases and weight gain over time. In addition, corn oil and soybean oil are highly refined with high heat and solvents, which oxidizes and damages the fragile polyunsaturated oils, and makes them even more inflammatory when you ingest them in processed foods.

It's not just people who eat too much corn based foods. A large amount of the nation's corn crop ends up feeding commercially raised cattle, which are cheaply fattened on corn and other grains before slaughter. Beef from corn-fattened cattle also has much higher ratios of inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids than healthier grass fed beef which contains more anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. Most meat in supermarkets comes from grain-fed animals and not healthy grass fed animals.

Because corn and other grains are an unnatural diet and difficult to digest, cattle raised on corn develop higher stomach acidity, which is a breeding ground for the dangerous E. coli O157:H7, the deadly strain of the bacteria. E-coli is rare in healthy grass-fed meat.

While eliminating refined grains such as corn and wheat (yes, it seems they are in everything!) can seem a very daunting task, the reward is a return to wonderful health, sparkling eyes, clear skin, clear thinking, and less body fat as the body is once again able to extract appropriate nutrients from food, reduced inflammation caused by grain based foods, and a resolution of nutritional deficiencies from the lack of absorption.

Do yourself a favor, and try at least 2 weeks with no grain products at all. I guarantee you will see some drastic improvements in your weight, energy, and general outlook! This is easier than you may think... For example, instead of having pasta with sauce and meat for dinner, a better alternative would be to have just grass-fed meat, tomato sauce, and veggies, topped with a little parmesan cheese. It’s delicious and no grains!

Another example would be breakfast... instead of cereals, bagels, or muffins, try to base most of your breakfasts on cage-free organic whole eggs with lots of veggies and perhaps some bison sausage or other nitrate/nitrite-free turkey or chicken sausage. If you're very active and need a little more carbs with your breakfast, instead of grains, a small piece of fruit or some tea with a little bit of raw honey can be great additions to the egg/veggies based breakfast. This is a delicious and satisfying breakfast that will control your blood sugar, balance your hormones, and eliminate the problems with antinutrients found in most grains. Those are just a couple examples, but I think you get the point of how easy this can be.

I know it may not be realistic for everybody to give up grains fully, so the most realistic plan for many people is to only eat grain based foods (bread, pasta, cereals, etc) on their one cheat day each week, and save 6 days per week to be grain-free. Your body with thank you!


So, how long have you been corn free?
February 24, 2012 9:51 AM
QUOTE:

I never eat anything that comes out looking the same way it went in


Here's a hint - Chew laugh
  6298282
February 24, 2012 9:51 AM
I think unless you have IBS or other stomach issues i don't see why you would need to stay away from corn...
February 24, 2012 9:52 AM
I bet I could find some kind of article or study to say we should never EVER eat broccoli because it will give us incurable diseases.


Anyway, corn's fine. Yes, it's really more of a grain than a vegetable and is higher in carbohydrates than green leafy veggies. But whatever. If you wanna eat corn, eat corn, it's not going to kill you!

I don't eat corn #1 because I'm just not a big fan and #2 it really weirds me out that it doesn't, you know, break down during digestion (you know what I'm talking about), but I don't think it's bad for you to eat if you want to eat it. Then again, I eat chips and queso and don't feel bad about that either. Moderation y'all.
  14254396
February 24, 2012 9:52 AM
Well I don't like corn, so I don't eat it. But I feel fine letting my kids eat corn....so eat corn and be merry.
February 24, 2012 9:52 AM
I don't subscribe to this "get rid of this one thing (these three things) and you will be slim" mentality.

If it is edible, I am going to eat it and enjoy it....especially if it comes from the earth. Mayans/Incas/other ancient civilizations ate corn as their primary food source and they didn't have problems with obesity and it's subsequent health issues.

I'm more likely to believe our problems are related to snicker's bars and the HUGE portions that have become the norm...oh, and sitting on our butts all day instead of going out, picking corn!
  15824876
February 24, 2012 9:53 AM
Lol why do these posts come from people who havent been on the forums but for a second.

Paleo?

Didnt we evolve?

LOL

If it works for you then hats off!
Image not displayed
  7369177
February 24, 2012 9:54 AM
QUOTE:



• Corn contains lots of fast digesting starches and sugar, which raises insulin levels, causes you to be hungrier and causes your body to store calories as fat.


Do yourself a favor, and try at least 2 weeks with no grain products at all. I guarantee you will see some drastic improvements in your weight, energy, and general outlook! This is easier than you may think... For example, instead of having pasta with sauce and meat for dinner, a better alternative would be to have just grass-fed meat, tomato sauce, and veggies, topped with a little parmesan cheese. It’s delicious and no grains!



So don't eat corn because it spikes your insulin and makes you fat, but eat meat which spikes your insulin and makes you fat? Of course the mere spiking of insulin doesn't make you fat
February 24, 2012 9:55 AM
QUOTE:

I only eat things that are alive.


I'm sorry, but what do you eat then?
  6298282
February 24, 2012 9:56 AM
I'm Native American. At least 75% according to the quantum. We are prone to alcoholism and diabetes among other things but those are the two prevalent in my family lineage. We don't eat a lot of corn or corn based products because they create spike in our blood sugar. We know this through blood testing, fasting and monitoring our sugar. However, this is ONLY true for our tribe as well as most tribes that orginated in the north eastern part of the US where corn doesn't grow that well. Tribes that originated in the midwest and the southwest don't seem to have this problem.

Now to address wheat. If we eliminate wheat from our diet, our blood sugar also tanks. That's virtually the only carbohydrate that was a staple of the Native American diet. I have no problem with wheat. I do have a problem with corn and corn-based products though. And I'm not even a full Indian.
  288781
February 24, 2012 9:56 AM
I think its a great article and worthy of sharing. By posting it, I am not saying that I am corn free, corn is almost everything we eat, just check the label and I love sweet corn on the cob in the summer but some of the points made are valid. I am giving this a shot and if I feel better then I'm going to give it up.
February 24, 2012 9:57 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I only eat things that are alive.


I'm sorry, but what do you eat then?


I'm assuming babies, mostly.
February 24, 2012 9:58 AM
QUOTE:

I never eat anything that comes out looking the same way it went in


Amen to that.
February 24, 2012 10:02 AM
Eat candy corn. Its the only corn that is good for you.
February 24, 2012 10:02 AM
QUOTE:

I think its a great article and worthy of sharing. By posting it, I am not saying that I am corn free, corn is almost everything we eat, just check the label and I love sweet corn on the cob in the summer but some of the points made are valid. I am giving this a shot and if I feel better then I'm going to give it up.


I'm curious, what points did you find valid?
Edited by Acg67 On February 24, 2012 10:02 AM
February 24, 2012 10:02 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I only eat things that are alive.


I'm sorry, but what do you eat then?


I'm assuming babies, mostly.


Delicious, delicious babies.
  14254396

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