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TOPIC: calories in pizza crust??

 
February 22, 2012 5:17 AM
Does anyone know how many calories in the crust of a typical pizzeria-style slice? There's a pizzeria I go to that makes a delicious margarita pie -- it's just a pretty thin crust, sauce and a few very thinly sliced pieces of fresh mozzarella. YUM, but I can't figure out the calories on it. Any ideas?
February 22, 2012 5:22 AM
you can ask your local shop.
I have no idea for my local place either, so i pick an option from the data base that seems similar.
Edited by AmyLRed On February 22, 2012 5:22 AM
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February 22, 2012 5:22 AM
The only thing I could think of to do is maybe for a recipe online for it and put the ingredients into the recipe maker here on MFP to get a round about idea of the calories.
February 22, 2012 5:22 AM
I'm assuming it's not technical "thin crust", meaning the crispy, cracker-like crust on a "true" think crust pizza. Is it more like a Papa John's style crust? That crust is pretty thin with a defined one-or-so inch edge. If it's something like that, for a regular sized piece, I'd say it's got about 200 cals plus toppings. For true cracker-like thin crust, it's likely more like 150. It is low in fat, though, unless it's a "pan" pizza like from Pizza Hut, where they brush the bottom with butter. These are just estimates based on my experience, and again, if you're buying by the slice at a pizzeria, the slices are likely to be larger than those from a traditional pizza.
Edited by LATeagno On February 22, 2012 5:24 AM
February 22, 2012 5:26 AM
Check the data for pizza dough. Most pizza dough is about 1000 calories for 16 ounces which is for an entire pizza.
February 22, 2012 5:26 AM
QUOTE:

Does anyone know how many calories in the crust of a typical pizzeria-style slice? There's a pizzeria I go to that makes a delicious margarita pie -- it's just a pretty thin crust, sauce and a few very thinly sliced pieces of fresh mozzarella. YUM, but I can't figure out the calories on it. Any ideas?

use pizza hut's to cross reference. it will be close enough. slice of a medium pan hawaiian at pizza hut is 260 calories. there thin was not that much less, we always get the pan because its more satisfying and your full on 2 slices, i find i eat half the thin crust pizza which in the end is more calories.
Edited by minnesota_deere On February 22, 2012 5:29 AM
February 22, 2012 5:27 AM
I make homemade pizza crust all the time. It's a pretty traditional, pizzeria-style thin crust. The dough contains bread flour, salt, sugar, olive oil, yeast, parmesan cheese and an Italian herb mix.

The entire recipe makes two 16" pizzas, and this is the nutritional information:

Calories for Entire Recipe: 1498
Carbs: 268 g
Protein : 52 g
Fat: 17 g
Sodium: 1833 mg

The calories for an individual serving depend on how much pizza you want to eat! :-)
Edited by UpEarly On February 22, 2012 5:30 AM
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February 22, 2012 5:28 AM
publix supermarkest have thier own brand of pizza dough that you can make at home- it is in the database- I use that....
February 22, 2012 5:39 AM
I just went to Brixx pizza the other day and the information was in MFP. The crust was very, very thin. My cheese pizza (10") was 930 for the whole thing. I believe they also had a margherita pie.
  12485813
February 22, 2012 5:42 AM
1. Search for the nutritional data on a Pizza Hut cheese pizza.
2. Contact Pizza Hut (or estimate if you think you're good) and ask them how many oz. of cheese they put on their pizza.
3. Estimate the amount of sauce used.
4. Collect the nutritional data in steps 2 and 3 and subtract these figures, along with a small amount of olive oil used to brush the crust from the entire pizza.
5. Estimate the width of the crust. Likely 1". Determine the difference in surface area between a 14" circle (large pizza) and a 13" circle (large pizza less the 1" crust) using the formula 2.14 x r^2. The difference between the two is the surface area of the crust.
6. Add 7-10% to this figure because there's usually more dough left on the edges of the uncooked pizza to allow for a crust.
7. Divide this number by the number of slices of pizza in the entire pizza (8?).
8. Subtract this figure / macros from each slice of pizza.
Edited by gp79 On February 22, 2012 5:42 AM
February 22, 2012 6:11 AM
I buy a premade crust that is very much like restaurant and it is 220 per 1/8th of a pizza just for sauce and crust. If the pizza is true stone oven baked without a lot of grease on the crust then that's probably a good estimate. I'd say for thin crust 200-220 for crust is probably a good range. Sauces very depending on whether oil is used. The good news is its a margarite pizza so cheese and tomato.

I agree with others tho that you should try to call them and ask. They may very week have nutritional info on hand.
  269591
February 22, 2012 6:17 AM
thanks everyone! Great ideas.
February 22, 2012 6:21 AM
Search the database for "Minsky" I've used the method I stated above for their large pepperoni Pizza.

To compare, use the database entry I've created (the one that says NO crust) and the regular pepperoni pizza one. It worked out to being roughly 63 calories per slice/crust. 8 slices per pizza makes it 504 calories of crust per large pizza.
Edited by gp79 On February 22, 2012 6:24 AM
July 6, 2014 6:12 PM
Anyone know the difference between thin crust gluten free pizza crust and a traditional thin crust pizza crust?
July 6, 2014 6:17 PM
QUOTE:

Anyone know the difference between thin crust gluten free pizza crust and a traditional thin crust pizza crust?


It will depend but I know at CPK the calories are higher on the gluten free - I was just looking at it about an hour ago (getting regular but curious on the gluten free because I have a friend with celiacs) - I want to say it was 100 calories more but can't remember exactly. Probably depends on what they use instead of wheat flour. This is compared to the original - I think the whole wheat crust is higher then the original too.
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