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TOPIC: Calories burned during weight training

 
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January 9, 2012 2:54 PM
How do we determine how many calories we burn when doing weight training? Then where do we enter the calories to get credit?
January 9, 2012 5:44 PM
I was just asking myself that same question. Help myfitnesspal.com!
January 9, 2012 5:45 PM
I just use the MFP cardio databse of strength training to estimate.
January 9, 2012 5:47 PM
QUOTE:

How do we determine how many calories we burn when doing weight training? Then where do we enter the calories to get credit?


the database on here...is not even remotely accurate...you rally need an HRM here, it comes down to how hard are you working out? how long? how long between sets...sooooo many variables you can't even become to ballpark the number, you can burn anywhere from 150-400 or more in an hour
January 9, 2012 5:47 PM
I use circuit training to log it (in cardio).
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January 9, 2012 5:48 PM
there is a website that tells you i googled how many calories do you burn weight lifting and it pulled up some websites pick one you like then add the calories to your cardio for the day other then that you'll never get credit for it :)
Edited by hapilymarried2006 On January 9, 2012 5:48 PM
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January 9, 2012 5:49 PM
bump
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January 9, 2012 5:50 PM
honestly...don't bother. Unless, I suppose, if you're doing marathon low weight, high rep, endurance-type weight training.
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January 9, 2012 5:51 PM
strength or weight training is hard to log because you need to make sure you are only logging calories burned during actual movement.... you cant count the calories you are burning while you are resting in between sets and so forth...... I would recommend a HRM, just be cautious of all the variable when it comes to those calories burnt...... just like doing cardio... if you stop to rest for a minute in between moves, you are going to log you burnt more than you did because you are counting "resting" calories that are already figured into your normal daily burn.... hope that made sense.
January 9, 2012 5:51 PM
QUOTE:

honestly...don't bother. Unless, I suppose, if you're doing marathon low weight, high rep, endurance-type weight training.



^agreed. I dont log any "weight training" because it is not a calorie burner like cardio.
January 9, 2012 5:51 PM
I agree. When I first started I would just go by what was in the database. It was WAY off. I now have a HRM and get the exact count. I do spinning, zumba, boot camp, and body pump. All of them in the database were way higher than what I was actually burning. Even the eliptical machines and treadmills say about 30% higher than what you really burn!!!
January 9, 2012 5:54 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

honestly...don't bother. Unless, I suppose, if you're doing marathon low weight, high rep, endurance-type weight training.



^agreed. I dont log any "weight training" because it is not a calorie burner like cardio.


Really? I burn more calories on a no rest between sets heavy a** weight workout, then the same amount of time running on the treadmill....depends on how you lift.
January 9, 2012 5:55 PM
I would suggest getting a body bugg or something similar.
May 20, 2012 1:22 PM
Hey Guys/Gals- I found the below article on LiveStrong.com (note references at the bottom of the article as well). Have no idea how accurate it is, but it is the closest helpful thing I have found regarding this issue. One thing that it does not take into consideration is the amount of weight you are lifting, but you might assume it would go along with the intensity level (I mean, how heavy can your weights be if you are doing "light weight lifting with moderate effort".

QUOTE:

Weight lifting is a great exercise to not only build strength and tone muscles but to increase your metabolic rate and burn even more calories. For every 3 lbs. of muscle you build, your metabolic rate increases by 7 percent, according to West Valley College. This in turn increases the number of calories you need to maintain your weight by 15 percent. As an added bonus, after a weight training session you continue to burn calories at a higher rate for up to 24 hours. The number of calories you burn during the weight lifting session itself depends on your body weight and the type and intensity of the weight training. Consult your doctor before beginning any new exercise program.

Step 1
Weigh yourself before each weight lifting session. The number of calories you burn partially depends on your weight.

Step 2
Time the number of minutes you lifted weights. This includes the time spent resting between repetitions.

Step 3
Determine the intensity value of your weight training. A bodybuilding level of effort is vigorous and burns 0.055 calories per pound per minute. Circuit training with weights burns 0.042 calories per pound per minute. Strength training with free weights burns 0.039 calories per pound per minute. Lighter weight lifting with moderate effort burns 0.028 calories per pound per minute.

Step 4
Calculate the number of calories burned. First, multiply your weight by the number of minutes you exercised. For example, if you weigh 140 lbs. and lifted weights for 35 minutes, the formula would be 140 x 35 = 4900. Then multiply this number by the intensity value to get the number of calories burned. If you were circuit training, the formula would be 4900 x 0.042 = 206 calories burned.


References
West Valley College Physical Education: Fitness Weight Training
MayoClinic.com: Calories Burned in 1 Hour
Riverside Community College District: Calories Burned Worksheet


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/338469-how-to-calculate-calories-burned-weight-lifting/#ixzz1vRWP7VCy
Edited by l3rob On May 20, 2012 1:24 PM
January 7, 2013 4:04 PM
There is also another (similiar method) that I think is easier.

For free weights only -

.039 x your weight = cal. burned x minutes exercised = cal. burned.

Example .039 x 139 =5.42 x 25min = 135.5

Hope this helps - although some may scoff at calories burned exercising with free weights I still want to know what I am burning even if it is approximate.
January 7, 2013 4:08 PM
I'm erring on the side of overestimating my weight training cals b/c you need to eat more to build muscle anyway.

Back when I was doing marathon strength training: high rep, low weight, quick movements and wore a HRM I'd burn about 400 cals/hr. I was 170lbs at 5'7 and in pretty good shape. If that helps for a benchmark.
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