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TOPIC: Does age effect ability to lose weight?

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December 2, 2011 9:24 PM
Hi, I'm 60 years old, and have struggled with weight issues all my life. It seems I pay a premium for the slightest slip in food choices. Is it my age? I lost 50 lbs over a span of 1 1/2 years and reached my goal at Christmas last year, but over this year I've regained 10-12 lbs. I can't seem to get them off! I started really trying after gaining 5 or 6, and held my own for a while, but now that is slipping away and I'm up a little more. Is it my age? Would anyone roughly my age in st louis area want to form a group for mutual encouragement, share tips, etc.? I am so frustrated, but I don't want to give up. I'm determined not to let this get out of hand, but could sure use some moral support. Any takers? I'd be happy be your cheer leader as well. drinker
  11516934
December 2, 2011 9:31 PM
Age absolutely does NOT affect your ability to lose weight. I'm not far from St. Louis and I've also created a group page for anyone to join and ask questions like these its called No Bull****; Just real, honest answers. You're more than welcome to join and ask whatever you'd like but I can assure you that age plays no role whatsoever in losing weight. It's actually quite simple, just keep your calories you intake everyday below what you are burning. Overall caloric intake is all that matters when it comes to weight loss.
December 2, 2011 9:34 PM
Not true as a woman that has been thru menapause your body tends to hold on to fat more because estrogen is store there especially in the stomach since the ovaries have reduce their production and you only have your glands producing the harmone. Do research.
December 2, 2011 9:35 PM
But you can lose weight but it is much harder.
December 2, 2011 9:36 PM
Search groups with "50plus" and "grandparents" and "women of a certain age"
There are 3 groups you can check out for starters before recreating the wheel.
Edited by MisterDubs303 On December 2, 2011 9:39 PM
  5788450
December 2, 2011 9:45 PM
I disagree. I am 53, and it is harder to lose weight than when I was in my 20's. If you don't work out, you lose muscle mass starting at around age 35. Muscle affects metabolism, and burns calories. So maybe you could eat 2000 calories when you were younger and not gain weight. But now that we are older & our metabolism is slower, if we still eat 2000 calories we will gain weight. So as you age you have to eat less just to maintain. This is harder.

But you can increase your metabolism, by building muscle. And yes, it still is just a simple mathematical equation. Calories in, must be less than calories burned.
  10624299
December 2, 2011 9:53 PM
Age can be a factor.

That means a consistent exercise program with both cardio and strength training is that much more critical.

As we get older many of us get more sedentary and lose muscle tissue due to lack of use. When we diet (this includes weight watchers) and lose weight, a good chunk is muscle and our metabolism slows. We then go back to our bad habits and ad more fat. The cycle worsens.

Exercise doing both cardio and strength training breaks the cycle by letting us lose the fat while retaining muscle if we eat enough protein and calories.
  1825423
December 2, 2011 9:56 PM
I'm sorry but you're all incorrect here. Age is of no significance in regards to weight loss. It all comes down to one thing if you are eating less calories than you burn you will lose weight. How can age have any affect on that at all?? People need to stop overcomplicating things that don't need to be. Estrogen also has no effect show me credible published studies proving otherwise and I'll consider your stance on the matter.
December 2, 2011 10:04 PM
Wow, thanks for the responses already! I will check for some of these already created groups, and all your comments really encourage me to think about both what I know and what I know but haven't acted upon. Like, I know I need more cardio and should add some weight training. I walk, but otherwise do not have a regular exercise program. I am the queen of excuses when it comes to why I don't exercise more... even though I know the reward would be awesome - weight loss, more stamina, happy endorphins, (sp?) etc. Thanks again!
  11516934
December 2, 2011 10:15 PM
QUOTE:

I'm sorry but you're all incorrect here. Age is of no significance in regards to weight loss. It all comes down to one thing if you are eating less calories than you burn you will lose weight. How can age have any affect on that at all?? People need to stop overcomplicating things that don't need to be. Estrogen also has no effect show me credible published studies proving otherwise and I'll consider your stance on the matter.

The fact of the matter is that a sixty year old woman who weighs in at say, your weight, does not have the same physical composition as you, specifically in terms of lean muscle mass. This is going to have an adverse effect on her metabolism by comparison.

Is it an excuse? No. Can she do it? Heck yeah. Do the basic concepts still apply? Of course. But, she will probably not be matching your activity level (based on your profile pic), and will be consuming a lot less calories and probably have to be much more careful about the quality and quantity of foods in order to remain at the same calorie deficit that you would. This might be a bit more of a challenge for a 60 year old who probably grew up with questionable nutrition values (if she's anything like my parents) compared to a strong, young guy like yourself, whose calorie burns probably afford you more options in terms of how you refuel.

Absolutely not an excuse, but the simple concept may be a touch more complicated to pull off.
Edited by MisterDubs303 On December 2, 2011 10:17 PM
  5788450
December 2, 2011 10:16 PM
<<<When women reach the age of 40, weight loss requires a different approach than it does for teenagers and young adults. As a person approaches the age of 40, changes occur within the body, often causing weight gain. A slower metabolism is a major cause of weight gain for women over 40. As a woman's body ages, she burns significantly less calories per day than she did when she was younger; if a woman does not compensate for these calories through eating less or exercising more, weight gain will be inevitable. However, through a few simple steps, a woman over 40 can lose weight.

Madelyn Fernstrom, PhD, and the director of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Weight Management Center advises that, as a result of slowed metabolism, a woman over 40 years old must cut out about 100 calories per day simply to maintain current weight. To lose weight, you will need to cut out more than 100 calories. Consider including whole grains, lean proteins, low fat dairy and plenty of produce for nutritious meals that are low in calories.>>>

I know it is hard for a 22 year old male to understand this. It can be done, but it is harder. I know from experience.
  10624299
December 2, 2011 10:20 PM
Absolutely not an excuse, but the simple concept may be a touch more complicated to pull off.


You are a wise man Mr Dubs.
Edited by baycat107 On December 2, 2011 10:22 PM
  10624299
December 2, 2011 10:24 PM
Yes, age affects your ability to lose weight. As androgen (in men) and estrogen and progesterone (in women) drops, your metabolism will change. Oddly enough, I'm more familiar with the male side of things even though I'm a woman, but men at least have a harder time maintaining muscle mass. Loss of muscle can decrease your metabolism. I presume something similar happens in women.

But... it doesn't make it impossible. And probably doesn't make a HUGE measurable difference.
December 2, 2011 10:25 PM
Age ABSOLUTELY plays a role in weight loss. I am much more active and eat better at age 42 than I was/did at age 25 and I'm 15 lbs heaver now. As we age our metabolism slows down making it harder for us to lose weight. It is a well-known fact that women naturally put on more weight as we age and it's because we need more fat on our bones when we're older than when we were young. Check out what your BMI should be at different ages.

Research good nutrition, find an exercise regimine that you can do and adjust as you go. It won't be easy, but it can be done! Best wishes!
  6011175
December 2, 2011 10:26 PM
QUOTE:

I'm sorry but you're all incorrect here. Age is of no significance in regards to weight loss. It all comes down to one thing if you are eating less calories than you burn you will lose weight. How can age have any affect on that at all?? People need to stop overcomplicating things that don't need to be. Estrogen also has no effect show me credible published studies proving otherwise and I'll consider your stance on the matter.


Deal :) I'll be back shortly with the credible studies you request.

I totally agree that people need to stop overcomplicating things... but science is so cool and there's nothing wrong with asking a question. The OP should go about losing weight just like the rest of us should... exercise and calorie deficit.
Edited by LabRat529 On December 2, 2011 11:02 PM
December 2, 2011 10:28 PM
Oh yah... one more reason age might affect your ability to lose weigh that's not at all related to hormones...

It's simply harder to exercise at 60 than it is at 20.
December 2, 2011 11:01 PM
QUOTE:

I'm sorry but you're all incorrect here. Age is of no significance in regards to weight loss. It all comes down to one thing if you are eating less calories than you burn you will lose weight. How can age have any affect on that at all?? People need to stop overcomplicating things that don't need to be. Estrogen also has no effect show me credible published studies proving otherwise and I'll consider your stance on the matter.


Here you go:

Clin Interv Aging. 2011;6:221-5. Epub 2011 Aug 19.
Weight gain since menopause and its associations with weight loss maintenance in obese postmenopausal women.
Sénéchal M, Arguin H, Bouchard DR, Carpentier AC, Ardilouze JL, Dionne IJ, Brochu M.
Source
Research Centre on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre, University Institute of Geriatrics of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
To examine the association between weight gain since menopause and weight regain after a weight loss program.

METHODS:
Participants were 19 obese women who participated in a 15-week weight loss program and a 12-month follow-up. Main outcomes were: body composition, resting metabolic rate, energy intake, energy expenditure, and weight regain at follow-up.

RESULTS:
All body composition measures significantly decreased after intervention (all P ≤ 0.01) while all measures of fatness increased significantly after the 12-month follow-up (P ≤ 0.01). Body weight gain since menopause was associated with body weight regain (r = 0.65; P = 0.003) after follow-up even after adjustment for confounders.

CONCLUSION:
Weight gain since menopause is associated with body weight regain following the weight loss program. Therefore, weight gain since menopause should be considered as a factor influencing weight loss maintenance in older women.
-----------------

Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Nov 1;160(9):912-22.
Physical activity and changes in weight and waist circumference in midlife women: findings from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.
Sternfeld B, Wang H, Quesenberry CP Jr, Abrams B, Everson-Rose SA, Greendale GA, Matthews KA, Torrens JI, Sowers M.
Source
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA 94611, USA. bxs@dor.kaiser.org
Abstract
Controversy exists regarding the extent to which age, menopausal status, and/or lifestyle behaviors account for the increased weight, fat mass, and central adiposity experienced by midlife women. To address this question, the authors longitudinally examined the relations of aging, menopausal status, and physical activity to weight and waist circumference in 3,064 racially/ethnically diverse women aged 42-52 years at baseline who were participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), an observational study of the menopausal transition. Over 3 years of follow-up (1996-1997 to 1999-2000), mean weight increased by 2.1 kg (standard deviation (SD), 4.8) or 3.0% (SD, 6.5) and mean waist circumference increased by 2.2 cm (SD, 5.4) or 2.8% (SD, 6.3). Change in menopausal status was not associated with weight gain or significantly associated with increases in waist circumference. A one-unit increase in reported level of sports/exercise (on a scale of 1-5) was longitudinally related to decreases of 0.32 kg in weight (p < 0.0001) and 0.10 cm in waist circumference (not significant). Similar inverse relations were observed for daily routine physical activity (biking and walking for transportation and less television viewing). These findings suggest that, although midlife women tend to experience increases in weight and waist circumference over time, maintaining or increasing participation in regular physical activity contributes to prevention or attenuation of those gains.

-------------------

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Jul;37(7):1195-202.
Menopause, physical activity, and body composition/fat distribution in midlife women.
Sternfeld B, Bhat AK, Wang H, Sharp T, Quesenberry CP Jr.
Source
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA 94611, USA. bxs@dor.kaiser.org
Abstract
PURPOSE:
Hormonal changes associated with menopause, chronological aging, and lifestyle, specifically physical activity, may all influence the changes in body composition and fat distribution experienced by midlife women. This cross-sectional study examined those relations in a representative sample of 248 white and Chinese women, ages 47-57, participating in an ancillary study to the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multi-center, longitudinal investigation of the natural history of the menopause in a racially/ethnically diverse cohort.

METHODS:
Body composition (lean mass, percent body fat) was assessed with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and central adiposity was determined by waist circumference. Physical activity was assessed from 7 d of accelerometer recordings. Menopausal status was based on self-reported bleeding patterns.

RESULTS:
Higher levels of physical activity, particularly vigorous-intensity activity, were generally independently associated with decreased percent body fat and smaller waist circumference, although these findings were not statistically significant in the Chinese women. Among the white women, every half a standard deviation increase in total activity was associated with a 1.6-point decrease in percent body fat (P = 0.002). Waist circumference decreased from 96.2 cm (SE = 1.04) in those doing no vigorous-intensity activity to 81.4 cm (SE = 1.05) in those doing 10 min or more a day (P for trend = 0.05). For both the whites and the Chinese, late peri- and postmenopausal status was associated with lower lean mass, and among the Chinese, tended to be associated with higher percent body fat.

CONCLUSION:
These findings suggest that regular physical activity may help to mitigate the tendency for weight gain and adverse changes in body composition and fat distribution that accompany aging and the menopausal transition.

--------------

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2000 May;904:502-6.
Menopause-related changes in body fat distribution.
Toth MJ, Tchernof A, Sites CK, Poehlman ET.
Source
Department of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405, USA. mtoth@zoo.uvm.ed
Abstract
Menopause-related changes in body fat distribution may partially explain the greater risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease during the postmenopausal years. To date, however, the effect of the menopause transition on body fat distribution remains unclear. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies using waist circumference or the waist-to-hip ratio show no effect of menopause on body fat distribution. By contrast, studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry showed increased trunk fat in postmenopausal women. Moreover, studies using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show that postmenopausal women have greater amounts of intra-abdominal fat compared to premenopausal women. Collectively, these studies suggest that the menopause transition is associated with an accumulation of central fat and, in particular, intra-abdominal fat. Whether menopause-related differences in trunk or intra-abdominal fat are independent of age and/or adiposity, however, is unclear. Thus, we recently examined the effect of menopausal status on body composition and abdominal fat distribution in 53 middle-aged, premenopausal women (47 +/- 3 years) and 28 early postmenopausal women (51 +/- 4 years). Postmenopausal women had 36% more trunk fat (p < 0.01), 49% greater intra-abdominal fat area (p < 0.01), and 22% greater subcutaneous abdominal fat area (p < 0.05) than premenopausal women. The menopause-related difference in intra-abdominal fat persisted (p < 0.05) after statistical adjustment for age and fat mass, whereas no differences were noted in trunk or abdominal subcutaneous fat. A similar pattern of differences in trunk, subcutaneous, and intra-abdominal fat was observed in subsamples of pre- and postmenopausal women matched for age or fat mass. Our data and that of others suggest that early postmenopausal status is associated with a preferential increase in intra-abdominal fat that is independent of age and total adiposity. Thus, CT and MRI should be used when examining menopause-related changes in body fat distribution.
-------------

Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Feb;24(2):226-31.
Effect of menopausal status on body composition and abdominal fat distribution.
Toth MJ, Tchernof A, Sites CK, Poehlman ET.
Source
Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Metabolic Research, Department of Medicine and Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
Preliminary studies suggest that the menopause transition is associated with deleterious changes in body composition and abdominal fat distribution. Limitations of the methodology used in these studies, however, render their conclusions controversial. Thus, the present study used radiologic imaging techniques to examine the effect of menopausal status on body composition and abdominal fat distribution.

DESIGN:
Cross-sectional.

SUBJECTS:
Fifty-three healthy, middle-aged, premenopausal women (mean+/-SD; 47+/-3 y) and 28 early-postmenopausal women (51+/-4 y).

MEASUREMENTS:
Total and regional body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal fat distribution by computed tomography.

RESULTS:
No differences in total body fat-free mass or appendicular skeletal muscle mass were noted between groups. In contrast, total body fat mass was 28% higher (23+/-7 vs 18+/-7 kg) and percentage fat 17% higher (35+/-6 vs 30+/-9%; both P<0.01) in postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women. Postmenopausal women had a 49% greater intra-abdominal (88+/-32 vs 59+/-32 cm2; P<0.01) and a 22% greater abdominal subcutaneous fat area (277+/-93 vs 227+/-108 cm2; P<0.05) compared to premenopausal women. The menopause-related difference in intra-abdominal fat persisted (P<0.05) after statistical adjustment for age and total body fat mass, whereas no difference in abdominal subcutaneous fat was noted. A similar pattern of differences in total and abdominal adiposity was noted in sub-samples of pre- and postmenopausal women matched for age or fat mass.

CONCLUSION:
Our data suggest that early-postmenopausal status is associated with a preferential increase in intra-abdominal fat that is independent of age and total body fat mass. International Journal of Obesity (2000) 24, 226-231


--------------

There's plenty of other ones... they're all similar in that they acknowledge that something is going on with body fat/weight post-menopause, and then a lot of them focus on how to fix it... but most come up with the same answer: diet and exercise.

I'll admit that a lot of it's correlative. As in, menopause happens and weight goes up... but that doesn't necessarily mean that menopause caused weight gain.
December 2, 2011 11:18 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm sorry but you're all incorrect here. Age is of no significance in regards to weight loss. It all comes down to one thing if you are eating less calories than you burn you will lose weight. How can age have any affect on that at all?? People need to stop overcomplicating things that don't need to be. Estrogen also has no effect show me credible published studies proving otherwise and I'll consider your stance on the matter.


Here you go:

Clin Interv Aging. 2011;6:221-5. Epub 2011 Aug 19.
Weight gain since menopause and its associations with weight loss maintenance in obese postmenopausal women.
Sénéchal M, Arguin H, Bouchard DR, Carpentier AC, Ardilouze JL, Dionne IJ, Brochu M.


You go Rebekah!!

Love all your scientific knowledge wink
Source
Research Centre on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre, University Institute of Geriatrics of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
To examine the association between weight gain since menopause and weight regain after a weight loss program.

METHODS:
Participants were 19 obese women who participated in a 15-week weight loss program and a 12-month follow-up. Main outcomes were: body composition, resting metabolic rate, energy intake, energy expenditure, and weight regain at follow-up.

RESULTS:
All body composition measures significantly decreased after intervention (all P ≤ 0.01) while all measures of fatness increased significantly after the 12-month follow-up (P ≤ 0.01). Body weight gain since menopause was associated with body weight regain (r = 0.65; P = 0.003) after follow-up even after adjustment for confounders.

CONCLUSION:
Weight gain since menopause is associated with body weight regain following the weight loss program. Therefore, weight gain since menopause should be considered as a factor influencing weight loss maintenance in older women.
-----------------

Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Nov 1;160(9):912-22.
Physical activity and changes in weight and waist circumference in midlife women: findings from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.
Sternfeld B, Wang H, Quesenberry CP Jr, Abrams B, Everson-Rose SA, Greendale GA, Matthews KA, Torrens JI, Sowers M.
Source
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA 94611, USA. bxs@dor.kaiser.org
Abstract
Controversy exists regarding the extent to which age, menopausal status, and/or lifestyle behaviors account for the increased weight, fat mass, and central adiposity experienced by midlife women. To address this question, the authors longitudinally examined the relations of aging, menopausal status, and physical activity to weight and waist circumference in 3,064 racially/ethnically diverse women aged 42-52 years at baseline who were participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), an observational study of the menopausal transition. Over 3 years of follow-up (1996-1997 to 1999-2000), mean weight increased by 2.1 kg (standard deviation (SD), 4.8) or 3.0% (SD, 6.5) and mean waist circumference increased by 2.2 cm (SD, 5.4) or 2.8% (SD, 6.3). Change in menopausal status was not associated with weight gain or significantly associated with increases in waist circumference. A one-unit increase in reported level of sports/exercise (on a scale of 1-5) was longitudinally related to decreases of 0.32 kg in weight (p < 0.0001) and 0.10 cm in waist circumference (not significant). Similar inverse relations were observed for daily routine physical activity (biking and walking for transportation and less television viewing). These findings suggest that, although midlife women tend to experience increases in weight and waist circumference over time, maintaining or increasing participation in regular physical activity contributes to prevention or attenuation of those gains.

-------------------

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Jul;37(7):1195-202.
Menopause, physical activity, and body composition/fat distribution in midlife women.
Sternfeld B, Bhat AK, Wang H, Sharp T, Quesenberry CP Jr.
Source
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA 94611, USA. bxs@dor.kaiser.org
Abstract
PURPOSE:
Hormonal changes associated with menopause, chronological aging, and lifestyle, specifically physical activity, may all influence the changes in body composition and fat distribution experienced by midlife women. This cross-sectional study examined those relations in a representative sample of 248 white and Chinese women, ages 47-57, participating in an ancillary study to the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multi-center, longitudinal investigation of the natural history of the menopause in a racially/ethnically diverse cohort.

METHODS:
Body composition (lean mass, percent body fat) was assessed with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and central adiposity was determined by waist circumference. Physical activity was assessed from 7 d of accelerometer recordings. Menopausal status was based on self-reported bleeding patterns.

RESULTS:
Higher levels of physical activity, particularly vigorous-intensity activity, were generally independently associated with decreased percent body fat and smaller waist circumference, although these findings were not statistically significant in the Chinese women. Among the white women, every half a standard deviation increase in total activity was associated with a 1.6-point decrease in percent body fat (P = 0.002). Waist circumference decreased from 96.2 cm (SE = 1.04) in those doing no vigorous-intensity activity to 81.4 cm (SE = 1.05) in those doing 10 min or more a day (P for trend = 0.05). For both the whites and the Chinese, late peri- and postmenopausal status was associated with lower lean mass, and among the Chinese, tended to be associated with higher percent body fat.

CONCLUSION:
These findings suggest that regular physical activity may help to mitigate the tendency for weight gain and adverse changes in body composition and fat distribution that accompany aging and the menopausal transition.

--------------

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2000 May;904:502-6.
Menopause-related changes in body fat distribution.
Toth MJ, Tchernof A, Sites CK, Poehlman ET.
Source
Department of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405, USA. mtoth@zoo.uvm.ed
Abstract
Menopause-related changes in body fat distribution may partially explain the greater risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease during the postmenopausal years. To date, however, the effect of the menopause transition on body fat distribution remains unclear. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies using waist circumference or the waist-to-hip ratio show no effect of menopause on body fat distribution. By contrast, studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry showed increased trunk fat in postmenopausal women. Moreover, studies using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show that postmenopausal women have greater amounts of intra-abdominal fat compared to premenopausal women. Collectively, these studies suggest that the menopause transition is associated with an accumulation of central fat and, in particular, intra-abdominal fat. Whether menopause-related differences in trunk or intra-abdominal fat are independent of age and/or adiposity, however, is unclear. Thus, we recently examined the effect of menopausal status on body composition and abdominal fat distribution in 53 middle-aged, premenopausal women (47 +/- 3 years) and 28 early postmenopausal women (51 +/- 4 years). Postmenopausal women had 36% more trunk fat (p < 0.01), 49% greater intra-abdominal fat area (p < 0.01), and 22% greater subcutaneous abdominal fat area (p < 0.05) than premenopausal women. The menopause-related difference in intra-abdominal fat persisted (p < 0.05) after statistical adjustment for age and fat mass, whereas no differences were noted in trunk or abdominal subcutaneous fat. A similar pattern of differences in trunk, subcutaneous, and intra-abdominal fat was observed in subsamples of pre- and postmenopausal women matched for age or fat mass. Our data and that of others suggest that early postmenopausal status is associated with a preferential increase in intra-abdominal fat that is independent of age and total adiposity. Thus, CT and MRI should be used when examining menopause-related changes in body fat distribution.
-------------

Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Feb;24(2):226-31.
Effect of menopausal status on body composition and abdominal fat distribution.
Toth MJ, Tchernof A, Sites CK, Poehlman ET.
Source
Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Metabolic Research, Department of Medicine and Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
Preliminary studies suggest that the menopause transition is associated with deleterious changes in body composition and abdominal fat distribution. Limitations of the methodology used in these studies, however, render their conclusions controversial. Thus, the present study used radiologic imaging techniques to examine the effect of menopausal status on body composition and abdominal fat distribution.

DESIGN:
Cross-sectional.

SUBJECTS:
Fifty-three healthy, middle-aged, premenopausal women (mean+/-SD; 47+/-3 y) and 28 early-postmenopausal women (51+/-4 y).

MEASUREMENTS:
Total and regional body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal fat distribution by computed tomography.

RESULTS:
No differences in total body fat-free mass or appendicular skeletal muscle mass were noted between groups. In contrast, total body fat mass was 28% higher (23+/-7 vs 18+/-7 kg) and percentage fat 17% higher (35+/-6 vs 30+/-9%; both P<0.01) in postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women. Postmenopausal women had a 49% greater intra-abdominal (88+/-32 vs 59+/-32 cm2; P<0.01) and a 22% greater abdominal subcutaneous fat area (277+/-93 vs 227+/-108 cm2; P<0.05) compared to premenopausal women. The menopause-related difference in intra-abdominal fat persisted (P<0.05) after statistical adjustment for age and total body fat mass, whereas no difference in abdominal subcutaneous fat was noted. A similar pattern of differences in total and abdominal adiposity was noted in sub-samples of pre- and postmenopausal women matched for age or fat mass.

CONCLUSION:
Our data suggest that early-postmenopausal status is associated with a preferential increase in intra-abdominal fat that is independent of age and total body fat mass. International Journal of Obesity (2000) 24, 226-231


--------------

There's plenty of other ones... they're all similar in that they acknowledge that something is going on with body fat/weight post-menopause, and then a lot of them focus on how to fix it... but most come up with the same answer: diet and exercise.

I'll admit that a lot of it's correlative. As in, menopause happens and weight goes up... but that doesn't necessarily mean that menopause caused weight gain.
  11477379
December 2, 2011 11:48 PM
Disregard exercise right now it has nothing to do with weight loss. Let me break this down even more for all of you fitness guru's. There's 3500 calories in a pound of body weight. If in one week I stay in a 500 calorie deficit meaning after 7 days I've burned 3500 calories, what it in the world makes you think I being 22 will lose 1 lb of body weight however this person at 60 will not? Are you all being serious right now, and I'm not trying to be a smart ass but my goodness this is so simple. She can live a completely sedentary life for all I care if she's eating at a deficit weight will be lost. Plain and simple.
December 2, 2011 11:51 PM
Here you go with the complications again...sigh...

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm sorry but you're all incorrect here. Age is of no significance in regards to weight loss. It all comes down to one thing if you are eating less calories than you burn you will lose weight. How can age have any affect on that at all?? People need to stop overcomplicating things that don't need to be. Estrogen also has no effect show me credible published studies proving otherwise and I'll consider your stance on the matter.

The fact of the matter is that a sixty year old woman who weighs in at say, your weight, does not have the same physical composition as you, specifically in terms of lean muscle mass. This is going to have an adverse effect on her metabolism by comparison.

Is it an excuse? No. Can she do it? Heck yeah. Do the basic concepts still apply? Of course. But, she will probably not be matching your activity level (based on your profile pic), and will be consuming a lot less calories and probably have to be much more careful about the quality and quantity of foods in order to remain at the same calorie deficit that you would. This might be a bit more of a challenge for a 60 year old who probably grew up with questionable nutrition values (if she's anything like my parents) compared to a strong, young guy like yourself, whose calorie burns probably afford you more options in terms of how you refuel.

Absolutely not an excuse, but the simple concept may be a touch more complicated to pull off.
December 2, 2011 11:58 PM
Age 67; run twice during week for 30 minutes and long run on weeknds 6 to 13 miles; cross train twice a week. no problem losing wieght if I stay under 1700 net calories a day. I haven't noticed any age-related changes.
December 3, 2011 12:03 AM
QUOTE:

Disregard exercise right now it has nothing to do with weight loss. Let me break this down even more for all of you fitness guru's. There's 3500 calories in a pound of body weight. If in one week I stay in a 500 calorie deficit meaning after 7 days I've burned 3500 calories, what it in the world makes you think I being 22 will lose 1 lb of body weight however this person at 60 will not? Are you all being serious right now, and I'm not trying to be a smart ass but my goodness this is so simple. She can live a completely sedentary life for all I care if she's eating at a deficit weight will be lost. Plain and simple.


Stop being obtuse.

What you're failing to understand is that as you age it becomes more difficult to create that deficit.

QUOTE:
Age 67; run twice during week for 30 minutes and long run on weeknds 6 to 13 miles; cross train twice a week. no problem losing wieght if I stay under 1700 net calories a day. I haven't noticed any age-related changes.


And a person half your age would be able to lose weight while eating more and exercising less.
December 3, 2011 12:08 AM
Although I typically don't support anecdotal examples I do appreciate it. Like I said I have no reason to anger anyone here but to continue allowing misinformation to be spread around on here isn't right. There are a lot of MD's out there who have were taught on old information. Unfortunately for them the world is an evolving place and in such a fast paced technologically advanced society new information is being discovered daily. This is a good case of that there was a time when people thought carbs made you fat. I mean really? So it isn't the fact that you're eating excess calories, "Oh no of course not it's simply because you are eating too many carbs!" (obviously not serious).

QUOTE:

Age 67; run twice during week for 30 minutes and long run on weeknds 6 to 13 miles; cross train twice a week. no problem losing wieght if I stay under 1700 net calories a day. I haven't noticed any age-related changes.
December 3, 2011 12:10 AM
Right, so you're telling me that with age it becomes harder to stop putting food into your mouth? You can't gain weight without eating nor can you lose weight without being in a caloric deficit. Stop trying to overcomplicate such a basic idea.

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Disregard exercise right now it has nothing to do with weight loss. Let me break this down even more for all of you fitness guru's. There's 3500 calories in a pound of body weight. If in one week I stay in a 500 calorie deficit meaning after 7 days I've burned 3500 calories, what it in the world makes you think I being 22 will lose 1 lb of body weight however this person at 60 will not? Are you all being serious right now, and I'm not trying to be a smart ass but my goodness this is so simple. She can live a completely sedentary life for all I care if she's eating at a deficit weight will be lost. Plain and simple.


Stop being obtuse.

What you're failing to understand is that as you age it becomes more difficult to create that deficit.

QUOTE:
Age 67; run twice during week for 30 minutes and long run on weeknds 6 to 13 miles; cross train twice a week. no problem losing wieght if I stay under 1700 net calories a day. I haven't noticed any age-related changes.


And a person half your age would be able to lose weight while eating more and exercising less.
December 3, 2011 12:28 AM
Cirellim,
First, "3500 calories in a pound of body weight"? Really? Where did you hear that from? Want to clarify what exactly it is with 3500 calories, or do you not really know?

You requested studies, they were given.

You got some supporting your point of view?

And remember, the question is NOT can you lose weight when you are older. That is what you have turned it into.

The question is - does age effect your ability to lose weight?

Read that correctly. Can you be as effective losing weight when older as you were younger?

Perhaps you read that wrong looking for something to jump on after reading some of the responses.

Really not as simple as you think. Hormones major factor already mentioned, especially for men. And slower metabolism.

Since you like the simple things as you keep saying, here is a simple explanation.

http://health.msn.com/health-topics/menopause/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100119089

Does metabolism slow or do we?
Both. But the slowing of metabolism is a real thing. “The primary thing that seems to occur is that mitochondria in the cells slow down with age,” says Newgard. (Think of mitochondria as little energy factories in cells that convert nutrients to power.)

And that’s not all. Barry Stein of Wake Forest University School of Medicine is writing a book about staying fit after 50. As he explains, “As we age, we are subject to sarcopenia—muscle wasting. Since muscle burns more energy than fat, this means the metabolic load goes down and metabolism reflects that.” That is, if you do nothing about your loss of muscle with age, it will take you longer to burn off a candy bar at age 60 than at 20.
Edited by heybales On December 3, 2011 12:31 AM

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