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TOPIC: Ounces in a chicken breast

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September 2, 2011 7:57 PM
How many oz. are in an average skinless/boneless chicken breast? (I don't have a food scale) When I log a chicken breast the automatic serving size says 4 oz. rather than one fillet, but a tilapia fillet logs in at 3 oz. My chicken serving is way larger than my tilapia serving. Should I just log the chicken as 8 oz. to be on the safe side?
Edited by SophRW On September 2, 2011 7:57 PM
September 2, 2011 8:00 PM
I would invest in a scale. The size varies a LOT. I got mine at Target for like $10 or less.
  3997270
September 2, 2011 8:01 PM
I just got a scale and discovered that the chicken breasts we've been buying are not 6oz as I had thought, but indeed 7.5oz. If you want to be on the safe side, I'd go for 8oz. Better to budget for more than too little.
September 2, 2011 8:07 PM
food scale will make a huge impact if you are keeping track to the oz or gram
  83975
September 2, 2011 8:09 PM
I used to log my chicken breasts as 4 oz, and then I bought a scale...OMG, not even close. Anywhere from 7 to 10 oz. Seriously, a $20 food scale is a necessity for accurate calories. Another one is 2 oz of pasta...compared to what I used to eat?? Yikes.
September 2, 2011 8:09 PM
Look at the number of ounces in the packages, and the number of breasts.... That's what I do.
September 2, 2011 8:11 PM
I can eyeball breast size, but I'd need to see 'em.
  4033053
September 2, 2011 8:12 PM
I have found that the 'average' chicken breast is usually 6-9oz.
September 2, 2011 8:13 PM
I have been told that 4oz of any meat should look like a deck of card....height and lenght. I use this eye ball for meats if I don't have a scale handy (like vacation and when I'm not eating at home)....but with a scale you can't go wrong....good luck!
September 2, 2011 8:16 PM
When I buy a pack of chicken breasts I usually get on that's smaller, around 4-5, then most of 'em are around 6-7, and then usually one on the larger side, around 8 or so. So weighing is always your best option.
July 19, 2013 5:28 AM
One boneless skinless chicken tenderlion is about 4 ounces not a full breast which is 7-9 oz
July 19, 2013 5:40 AM
A food scale is definitely worth the investment.

I also get the Perdue Perfect Portions chicken breasts. They come individually wrapped and are 140 cal for each breast. Saves me some time sometimes!
  106209
July 19, 2013 5:42 AM
QUOTE:

A food scale is definitely worth the investment.

I also get the Perdue Perfect Portions chicken breasts. They come individually wrapped and are 140 cal for each breast. Saves me some time sometimes!


Food. Scale.
  17170557
July 19, 2013 5:47 AM
QUOTE:

Look at the number of ounces in the packages, and the number of breasts.... That's what I do.


This. Some of the breasts I've had were almost 16 oz. Those chickens had some big hooters!
  3240741
July 19, 2013 5:48 AM
I now buy pre-packaged, hand trimmed, organic 4 oz chicken breasts, to save myself time and hassle. If for some reason I just buy regular chicken breasts, I look at the weight on the package and figure out how many ounces per chicken breast, and break the chicken down into close to 4 oz servings. It's been my experience that most chicken breasts are around 8 oz per breast so I usually butterfly 1 chicken breast into two servings, this saves calories, money and cooking time!
July 19, 2013 5:52 AM
QUOTE:

I can eyeball breast size, but I'd need to see 'em.


http://instantrimshot.com
July 19, 2013 6:01 AM
Get a food scale that measures ounces and grams. You can get them at Walmart, Target or similar stores.
  230623
July 19, 2013 6:05 AM
It varies, but those things are usually 6-8 oz. Pretty much never 4. It's pure protein for the most part so if you're off by a bit it really doesn't matter. 24 calories never killed anybody
July 19, 2013 6:08 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Look at the number of ounces in the packages, and the number of breasts.... That's what I do.


This. Some of the breasts I've had were almost 16 oz. Those chickens had some big hooters!


laugh
  28812302
July 19, 2013 6:16 AM
I think the dark meat is heavier!!
July 19, 2013 6:30 AM
QUOTE:

I think the dark meat is heavier!!

But it's the tastiest. Nom nom nom. I tend to go for chicken thighs instead - tastier and cheaper. Just weigh and log the calories.
July 19, 2013 6:56 AM
QUOTE:

Look at the number of ounces in the packages, and the number of breasts.... That's what I do.


hahah Brilliant, Wattson!

Seriously though, just buy a scale. You don't need an expensive one.
July 19, 2013 7:04 AM
I never found a way to measure this accurately if the breast has bones. The database (and packaging) is unclear if the weight includes the bones or not. I guess I should weigh the thing before and after eating and then subtract...
July 19, 2013 7:39 AM
Gotta get a food scale. I got mine at Walmart for like $12. I thought I was eating 4oz chicken breasts. Turns out, I was eating anywhere from 7oz to 10oz. That is a BIG calorie difference.
  19306329
July 19, 2013 7:48 AM
QUOTE:

How many oz. are in an average skinless/boneless chicken breast? (I don't have a food scale) When I log a chicken breast the automatic serving size says 4 oz. rather than one fillet, but a tilapia fillet logs in at 3 oz. My chicken serving is way larger than my tilapia serving. Should I just log the chicken as 8 oz. to be on the safe side?


A serving size IS 4 oz...your average breast is going to vary substantially. The ones I get are usually right around 8 oz and I by organic chicken. When I bought regular chicken, it wasn't unusual to have a 10 oz breast.

Really, you should invest a marginal sum of money for a food scale. They're not that expensive.

QUOTE:

I never found a way to measure this accurately if the breast has bones. The database (and packaging) is unclear if the weight includes the bones or not. I guess I should weigh the thing before and after eating and then subtract...


A serving of chicken breast MEAT is 4 oz. If your package says serving is 4 oz, it's talking about the meat.

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