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TOPIC: How does one burn over 1000 calories a day?

 
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August 4, 2011 1:32 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

You have to take into account weight as well...a 300-pound person is going to burn more doing the exact same exercise as a 150 pound person simply because they are expending so much more energy to move that kind of weight.


I'm not an expert, but would disagree with that statement. This is what I use to calculate since my HRM doesn't work when GPS isn't on. http://www.braydenwm.com/calburn.htm. If I weigh less, I burn more than when I weigh more.

I run and if I run for an hour or more I can really burn that many calories . I also can burn that many working out 2x per day doing different things - like Insanity and something more mild in the evening. I work out fairly intensely, that's what it takes. But, I would caution someone who's just getting into exercise to be careful of that.


I'm sorry, but I can promise you that being 270 lbs I burn almost twice what my friend does (around 140) doing the exact same class, same duration. It takes a lot more out of me to walk or run than it does her, and I most definitely have seen LOWER calorie burns as I lose the weight.
  2187305
August 4, 2011 1:34 PM
QUOTE:

Since no one's mentioned it yet, I will - there's no reason to shoot for that high of a calorie burn, unless you want to do it once in a while just as a personal challenge. As long as you're working out seriously for around 45-60 minutes a day, you're golden.


This - if you want to, ok, but there's no rule stating you have to burn that kind of calories. I burn 250-300 a day on average and have lost 29 pounds in 4 months.
August 4, 2011 1:51 PM
Keep in mind that a effort like that will deplete your muscles of glycogen (energy) in fact preventing you from exercising more often as supposed to harder. I'd take 7 days of 500 cal workouts = 3500 than 3 x 1000 which in part what will do for you is to burn in your brain the idea that working out is painful as if we don't go through enough self-negative-talk.
  6886610
August 4, 2011 1:56 PM
1.) My daily gym routine lasts like 60-80 minutes (depends on how long my breaks are), includes cardio and strength work outs, burns 600 calories and that's doing 30-45 minutes of cardio and the remaining minutes for strength training.

2.)
A. when I'm working out alone I sometimes spend an extra 1 hour in either cross trainers or elliptical trainers and I burn around 500-600 calories in that hour... THAT'S ADDITIONAL TO MY DAILY GYM ROUTINE.

B. when I'm with my boyfriend, we play competitive badminton for an hour to an hour and a half, and that burns around 500-600 calories as well... This is also additional to my daily gym routine...

TOTAL CALORIES BURNED FOR A DAY: +/- 1200 (2-3 hours of working out and/or playing sports with my daily gym routine)
  583734
August 4, 2011 1:56 PM
Bump for later.
  7760780
August 4, 2011 1:56 PM
mkay im only a tad heavier than you when i want to burn 1000+ cals i walk to town 6miles round trip i do that twice 1-2 of those miles are Uphill takes 1hr 30mins each round trip way so a total of 3 hours but i do not do it all at once (i use my hrm to determine my calories burned)
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August 4, 2011 1:59 PM
I do sometimes through skating, roller derby training
  7220054
August 4, 2011 2:01 PM
Zumba or dancing, running , swimming, playing baseball, ultimate Frisbee and so many other fun things to do to burn so many calories in a day.
  7678507
August 4, 2011 2:02 PM
I go hiking a lot - wearing a 20-30 pound backpack on steep, mountainous trails. It's pretty easy to burn 1000 calories that way!
  6511124
August 4, 2011 2:05 PM
When I burn 1000+ calories I work out for 90-100 minutes. 1 hour cardio, 30-40 minutes of strength training. I wear a HRM and it tells me I have been burning some more than the machines say. I have no idea about mfp's estimates never tried. But as others say I weigh a little over 50lbs more than you I will easily burn more than you.
  6533830
August 4, 2011 2:05 PM
there's this machine at the gym i go to that is called the arc trainer. it's kind of like the eliptical but it works all of your body. going at a slow and steady pace i can burn 800 calories in an hour. if i bust my ass a little more then i can burn well over 1000 calories.
August 4, 2011 2:08 PM
Its not uncommon for me to burn 1k calories a day in the gym, my usual gym day consists of atleast 2 gym classes (going up to 4), with an hrm.

which can range me from 1100 cals to 2800 cals depending on the classes. (a few times over 3000 from walking long distances before and after my classes).

I built myself up for these durations.

However it is alot better that you do what you find comfortable and enjoy to aid you with your fitness, trust me i wouldnt do the classes if i didnt enjoy them.
Edited by Delicate On August 4, 2011 2:09 PM
  2862508
August 4, 2011 2:19 PM
it could be combined calories from a couple or a few different things too- it doesn't list them seperately on the "news" area. For example i'll burn 500+ in a day, but I logged three different things, like walked 3 miles, tracy anderson 30 min dvd and 30 min jillian michaels dvd and instead of your news listing all that it'll just say "starlage burned 512 calories doing exercises including tracy anderson " and I'll get comments like "WOW BIG BURN! GOOD JOB!" and I"m like "thanks but it wasn't all at once." Just an idea.
Edited by Starlage On August 4, 2011 2:20 PM
  5347022
August 4, 2011 2:26 PM
QUOTE:

Much thanks for all the suggestions! It seems running/biking for an hour is the suggested form of exercise to burn a big amount... which translates as impossible for me at the moment. The main reasons is, I'm not physically fit enough to actually run for an hour. I can't quite even complete 1 round at the track by running, which is why I alternate between running and brisk walking. :(

I tried to start the C25K in hopes of finally being able to run for a good length of time, but it's been difficult to actually put it to practice because it rains a heck load where I live. I also live in a city, so hiking and all that nice nature stuff is out too. :(

Most of my cardio at the gym is spent by doing intervals though (in hopes of burning more and increasing my endurance as well), but even pushing it like crazy (for me) with high intensity intervals for 30 minutes... or more accurately 25 minutes of intervals, with 5 minutes of warm up, I'm burning about a little under 300 according to the elliptical machine at the gym. I don't know whether doing intervals is supposed to burn more calories, but it seems the machines register them the same way whether you're going at a steady pace or alternating high intensities. I guess my question would then be: is there a difference in the amount of calories burned in a session of intervals vs steady pace (other than saved time or after burn, etc.)?

Thanks again, all! :)


hey, if you do say 3 miles steady run, or 3 miles interval your still going to burn the same as ur body is going the same distance. although your pace is steady on the steady run, youl be going faster then slower than that on the interval so it will prob even itself out to the same pace as if you were doing a steady run, so it will burn the same......hope that makes sense lol
August 4, 2011 2:33 PM
Just know that it takes a lot of time and effort to put up 4-digit calorie burns.

Personally, I burn 1000- 1300+ a few times per week on any of my 6+ mile trail runs. I'm 38 and 180lbs, and maintain nearly 160bpm HR to accomplish that too (8:30 minute miles with 1500 ft elevation gains).

I'm not alone in that either. Lots of distance runners put out bigger numbers than that, even at slower paces. You just have to be at it longer.

You can't just run out and pull off a feat like that without hating it or injuring yourself. Put in a solid effort and shoot for lower numbers. As your fitness improves, so will your intensity levels, and consequently, you'll burn more calories.
August 4, 2011 2:34 PM
Well call it basic and simple but if you want to burn 1000 calories a day (which is kinda insane by the way as thats about half or more of what you need to stay alive), I would say up the cardio, add intensity with light weights (ie: weighted squats, dumbell overhead squat press, etc ... see GSP Rushfit [google it]), base your diet around slow burn proteins like chicken, fish, chicpeas , and mixed nuts, and eat six small snack-like meals per day rather than three larger ones so the metabolism is kept burning. I also have had a great deal of success with green tea extract and CLA suplements. I am an amature mixed martial arts competitor and I often use green tea (cold) in my recovery drinks before fight day so I can make weight for my division. Another route, although not recommended, would be to consume fewer calories than you are burning in daily activity (if you burn 500 calories during your workout also subtract 500 calories from your daily food intake to make up the 1000 calorie defecit. if you need any further advice feel free to message me, I may not be a certified trainer but I have been at this for a very long time and have found many strategies that work.
p.s. check out beachbody.com, the forums are excellent resources and there are several online coaches who will be more than happy to steer you in the right direction.
August 4, 2011 2:40 PM
QUOTE:



hey, if you do say 3 miles steady run, or 3 miles interval your still going to burn the same as ur body is going the same distance. although your pace is steady on the steady run, youl be going faster then slower than that on the interval so it will prob even itself out to the same pace as if you were doing a steady run, so it will burn the same......hope that makes sense lol


That may or may not be a true statement. It all comes down to intensity levels, conditioning, fitness levels, and so on.

Example. When I'm running hard, I know I can burn nearly 150 -160 calories per mile, versus 100-120 per mile at an easier pace. If I stop at 1 mile, I will continue to burn calories at a faster rate for a short time later than had I ran that mile at an easier pace. I just believe the calorie burn, per minute, at the slower pace is can't match the calorie burn, per minute, at the faster pace, even considering you covered that mile faster.


Instead of choosing a distance to run (ex. 3 miles), choose a time to run for (ex. 30min). This will make the math a lot easier. smile
Edited by AZTrailRunner On August 4, 2011 2:44 PM
August 4, 2011 2:41 PM
I have a HR monitor (actually a bodyfit which is like the body bugg used on Biggest loser) and I'm just under 200 lbs. (So essentially, I'm a 140lb girl that runs with a 60lb back pack on...that's what I tell myself.) When I want to get around 1000 calories I have to do about 30 minutes on the elliptical at a decent resistance. Then I do walk/run intervals for an hour on the treadmill. I can't move when I do it. When I'm finished with the treadmill, I find that the tread mill has UNDER estimated my calories burned by around 150 - 175 calories. Now, when I used to weigh 160 lbs I couldn't burn as much. Weight is one of the big factors of caloric burn. So, when you run, just throw a backpack on and put some weights in them ;)
August 4, 2011 2:41 PM
You will lose more weight through diet anyways, so don't beat yourself up trying to achieve goals that may be lofty.

I run for fitness, not for calorie burn. The calorie burn is not my goal, merely a by-product of the exercise. I'm happier that way.
Edited by AZTrailRunner On August 4, 2011 2:43 PM
August 4, 2011 3:21 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Calories burned depends on two factors: intensity x body weight. If intensity is equal, a heavier person will burn more than a lighter person, and vice versa. It's no more complicated than that.

I often use running at 6 mph (10 min/mile) as an example, because it's a work intensity that a lot of people can relate to and the math is easier. Running at this speed is an intensity of about 10 METs.

Back to the original formula: Calories burned/hour = Intensity (METs) x body weight (in kg). So, to burn 1000 calories in an hour running 6 mph, one would have to weigh at least 220 lb (100 kg).

A runner at 80kg (176 lb) would have to run 8:10 mile pace for an hour to burn 1000 calories.

At the OPs weight of 60 kg, she would have to run at a 5:30/mile pace for an hour to burn 1000 calories.

So it takes a combination of moderate/high weight and high fitness to be able to burn 1000 calories/hour.

A lot of people using cheap HRMs or who have not set up their HRMs properly are getting inflated readings. A significant percentage of exercisers have max heart rates that are higher than the age-predicted estimate that HRMs use by default. As a result, the HRM thinks they are constantly working at 90%-100+% of max when they might only be at 65%-75%.

Things like thermal stress, high proportion of upper-body work, cardiovascular drift, can lead to artificially elevated heart rates and, thus, overstated calorie counts.


Thanks for the very helpful explanation! How does one find out what intensity (MET?) level an exercise is? I got a bit confused on the part "5:30/mile"... what does the 5:30 stand for? 5 miles in 30 minutes? Sorry if that sounds completely stupid... :P

Regarding what you said about estimating calories burned... would you say online tools like the one MFP has to estimate calories burned is fairly accurate? Or not really at all?

Once again, thank you for shedding some light into this. It's looking more and more unlikely for me to be burning 1000 calories a day anytime soon, it seems. :\


Sorry--sometimes I lapse into runner jargon--that's how I got started on this whole path.

5:30 means 5 minutes, 30 seconds per mile.

And, as others have said, there is no point in burning 1000 calories--it's just an arbitrary number.

Calorie burn and weight loss goals need to be proportionate to the size of the individual. Yes, at 60 kg, it is unlikely that you will burn 1000 calories in a workout. However, a loss of 5-6 pounds will make a significant difference in your appearance, whereas on a larger person who burns a lot of calories in a workout, it might not even be noticeable. So, it all works out in the end wink

I only keep track because I am a performance and numbers-driven person when it comes to exercise and those are the types of goals that motivate me--I keep all kinds of extraneous benchmark data.
August 4, 2011 3:47 PM
QUOTE:

Just know that it takes a lot of time and effort to put up 4-digit calorie burns.

Personally, I burn 1000- 1300+ a few times per week on any of my 6+ mile trail runs. I'm 38 and 180lbs, and maintain nearly 160bpm HR to accomplish that too (8:30 minute miles with 1500 ft elevation gains).

I'm not alone in that either. Lots of distance runners put out bigger numbers than that, even at slower paces. You just have to be at it longer.

You can't just run out and pull off a feat like that without hating it or injuring yourself. Put in a solid effort and shoot for lower numbers. As your fitness improves, so will your intensity levels, and consequently, you'll burn more calories.


THIS!! Distance runner here and I am only at about a 10 min pace. BUT, when I am in the heart of training for a 10+ mile race, I can burn 1000 cals a couple of times a week. Nor is it unusual if I am biking a lot since most of my rides are 25+ miles. But I certainly didn't start out there.

And I believe someone has already pointed out that diet has more to do with weight loss than exercise.
Edited by RMinVA On August 4, 2011 3:51 PM
  1678302
August 4, 2011 3:54 PM
Here are the keys: be fairly heavy and be able to run fast.

I'm ~ 175 lbs and I can burn 1,000 in an hour if I run at solid clip (~ 7:30 pace).

If you weight less and/or run slower then you have to run longer.
August 4, 2011 4:10 PM
To answer your question, quite easily.

I used to be a speed-swimmer, and swam for up to two hours a day, very quickly. I also ran a mile in the morning and before sleeping. After school, I would run between one and three miles as well. I was on three different soccer teams, played badminton, and walked everywhere. In the winter, I was on the downhill and cross-country skiing teams. During the summers, I ran, kayaked, canoed, swam and biked fourteen miles daily. I was burning massive amounts of calories through what amounts to hours of exercise each day.

Right now, I'm training for lengthy hiking trips, so that involves strapping around thirty-five pounds on my back and hiking up and down hills for a couple hours. This alone burns quite a bit, and I'm a very small person with a normal BMI. Someone larger would burn even more. Two hours of hiking would be over a thousand for most people. It's exactly one thousand for me.

I should also mention that bigger people burn more calories, even when they're doing less. So someone who is 300 lbs jogging for ten minutes could burn the same amount as someone who is, say 120 lbs jogging for an hour. Carrying more weight burns more calories.
  6385081
August 4, 2011 4:24 PM
i ride my bike to work and back at a vigorous pace. that's about 90 minutes which MFP says is good for about 1,330 calories. then i lift for 45 minutes at lunch which is worth another 170 or so.

according to mfp, i should be eating about 4,600 calories after factoring in the workouts. after my first week on MFP i was at a 10,000 calorie deficit and had lost 3 lbs - that's pretty darn accurate...
August 5, 2011 7:29 AM
QUOTE:

Much thanks for all the suggestions! It seems running/biking for an hour is the suggested form of exercise to burn a big amount... which translates as impossible for me at the moment. The main reasons is, I'm not physically fit enough to actually run for an hour. I can't quite even complete 1 round at the track by running, which is why I alternate between running and brisk walking. :(



You don't have to start out running or biking for an hour. Go for a run around the block. Do 1 mile 3x/ week for the first week. Then add 1/2 mile the second week. If you have to walk for some of it, that is ok. You will develop the fitness to run the entire 1.5 miles. When you can do that, bump to 2 or 2.5 miles. Then bump up to 3-4 miles. Once you are doing 3-5 miles/day several times a week, you will see your conditioning improve dramatically. If you want to build up to longer runs, keep adding distance every couple of weeks.

Cycling is another way to burn a ton of calories. In a typical 25 mile ride, I am burning 1200 to 1300 calories, riding at a fast pace. But I did not start out riding that distance. I spent several months (in the winter) training 2x/wk on a spin bike.

I agree with the other posters that you don't need to hit a 1000 calories to effectively lose weight. My weight training workouts are around 200-300 calories, and that still adds "room" to my daily allowance. Plus weight training has a residual benefit of additional calories burned after the workout is done. I am told that you will burn another 50% of the total calories of your workout in the 3-4 hours after the workout. So if you burn 300 doing weight training, your body will burn another 150 during the 3-4 hours after the workout. I don't log this, of course, but it is nice to know about.

I have said this to others, but it is worth repeating. This is a process. All of the changes in your body will take time. Plan on slow and steady progress.
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