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TOPIC: Bradycardia or Athlete's Heart Syndrome

 
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July 6, 2011 12:13 PM
I've been exercising for over an hour each day for about 5 days a week and sometimes 6. I've noticed that over the 2 months that I have been exercising more my heart rate at rest is much lower, yesterday I measured it at 48 bpm which is below what is considered normal (60 bpm and above).
I was reading about it and aparently extreme exercise can cause this and it is common on athlete's that exercise regularly for long periods. I'm planning on bringing this up on the next consultation with the doctor but I'm afraid he may tell me to stop exercising for a while at least.
Exercise is the root of all my weight loss process and my bid to become healthier, I don't know if I could do this without exercising at all or reducing it significantly.
I feel fine for the most part and my energy levels are good pretty much every day but this has been in my head for a few days now and I wanted to share with you and ask opinions of someone out there that may be experiencing the same or have experienced it in the past.

I still have a long road ahead and am wondering if there's any problem in exercising with this condition? Should I see the doctor ASAP or leave it as it is until the next time I have to return there (about 2 months time)?

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Regards,

Rod
  4605719
July 6, 2011 12:21 PM
Why don't you just call your doctor and leave a message with this question? I wouldn't want to risk heart advice on people with no medical degrees. It is probably ok, but your doctor should be the one saying you are clear to exercise, not strangers.
  5491015
July 6, 2011 12:21 PM
My resting heart rate is 48-50....always has been since I was young. Hope it doesn't get any lower now I've started regularly exercising!
  7354188
July 6, 2011 12:21 PM
Yes- this is a good thing..my resting heart rate is in the low 50's. Your heart muscle is getting fitter so it requires less pumps to get the blood through your body..which means less use...which means will last longer. Exercise is amazing!
July 6, 2011 12:22 PM
QUOTE:

Why don't you just call your doctor and leave a message with this question? I wouldn't want to risk heart advice on people with no medical degrees. It is probably ok, but your doctor should be the one saying you are clear to exercise, not strangers.


Actually- that's the best answer!
July 6, 2011 12:22 PM
I don't think this is a problem at all. Athletes normally have resting heart rates and it's due to fitness, not trouble. :)
  6754049
July 6, 2011 12:24 PM
My resting heart rate is 42, and while working out, it rarely goes above 135. I was just in for a checkup last week, and mentioned my low heart rate to my doctor. I was told that it could be one of two things: either a blockage (very bad), or just an abnormally slow heartrate. I was hooked up to an EKG machine and tested. No blockage, just low heartrate -- we think I'm part turtle. The doc then said that I have an incredibly fit and strong heart that's working super-effectively -- I just have to drop the rest of the weight.

My point is that there COULD have been a blockage causing the low heart rate. You never know unless you go to your doctor and get checked out. It could be a blockage... or you could be a fellow turtle.
July 6, 2011 12:25 PM
Unless one of these people tell you they are a physician and know all your health history, etc., I would go to a doctor. What may be "ok" for them, according to them or their cardologists or whatnot, may not be for you.
July 6, 2011 12:29 PM
The normal heart rate of between 60 to 100 bpm is an accepted standard for an average healthy adult. You are no longer average and that is important to remember. Your body has become very, very efficient in it's utilization of oxygen and your heart has become more efficient pushing blood through your system. It simply doesn't need to beat any faster than it currently does at rest. That is a GOOD thing! I believe any doctor will tell you that as long as you are asymptomatic, keep on doing what you are doing!

One day when you're 70 years old, some cardiologist is going to be amazed that you have the heart of a 30 year old.
Edited by ttrotter1960 On July 6, 2011 12:30 PM
July 6, 2011 12:40 PM
One thing though, severe bradycardia is a situation that normally applies to seasoned, toned athletes who have trained for years not months. If your photograph is current then I would (respectfully) caution you to make an appointment for a check-up and mention this drop in heart-rate to your doctor. Being on the heavy side tends to drive-up both heart-rate and blood pressure. Always be on the safe side.
Edited by ttrotter1960 On July 6, 2011 12:42 PM
July 6, 2011 6:10 PM
QUOTE:

One thing though, severe bradycardia is a situation that normally applies to seasoned, toned athletes who have trained for years not months. If your photograph is current then I would (respectfully) caution you to make an appointment for a check-up and mention this drop in heart-rate to your doctor. Being on the heavy side tends to drive-up both heart-rate and blood pressure. Always be on the safe side.


The photograph you see there is from the begining of March of this year, I have since lost 41lbs and exercised regularly. I have no symptoms whatsoever, no tachycardia that I notice nor anything like that.
Perhaps I'll just book an appointment for next week or so then. See if I can fit it in for next Monday just to be on the safe side. I'll also keep an eye on it.

Just FYI, after a rest day yesterday I measured and I was at 59.

With regards to blood pressure it has been around 115/60 pretty stable, some days as high as 122 but not much more then that which is within the normal (if a tad high) limits.
  4605719
July 6, 2011 9:02 PM
Better safe than sorry. Get checked out. It will give you peace of mind.

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