Message Boards » Food and Nutrition

TOPIC: Clean eating and protein powder

« Prev 1
« Prev 1
 
Ic_disabled_photos
Topic has been inactive for 30 days or more and images have been disabled.
Display All Images
June 24, 2011 11:02 AM
I've been eating clean for many years and have always wondered how protein powder can be clean. Most people who are clean eaters stay away from junk food/processed food. In my opinion, protein powder is so processed....how can it be clean? I use it, but have always had the thought in the back of my mind that it is highly processed. Can someone please explain to me how it can be an acceptable clean eat food?
Thanks for any opinions....
June 24, 2011 11:06 AM
Bump, I've wondered this same thing. I've notice that on Mark's Daily Apple, he sells protein powder, but how can that be paleo?
  5444783
June 24, 2011 11:06 AM
I consider it a sort of gray area. But FWIW, I recently switched to a "natural" kind, that uses stevia instead of artificial sweeteners. It tastes perfectly great, and gives me a little more peace of mind.
June 24, 2011 11:09 AM
It's a by... or is that co-product of cheese making, if you eat cheese then you're eating what's left after the whey has been removed.
I'd not worry about the processing of it, but truvia on the other hand... meh I'll take stevia itself anyday.
  3335912
June 24, 2011 11:14 AM
QUOTE:

I've been eating clean for many years and have always wondered how protein powder can be clean. Most people who are clean eaters stay away from junk food/processed food. In my opinion, protein powder is so processed....how can it be clean? I use it, but have always had the thought in the back of my mind that it is highly processed. Can someone please explain to me how it can be an acceptable clean eat food?
Thanks for any opinions....

Please explain how it's dirty. Since I assume you're going to say it's processed, please explain why that's remotely bad in a diet that favors whole, micronutrient-dense foods.
June 24, 2011 1:20 PM
I'd also ask for a definition of "clean eating".

Also being quoted makes me feel weird. Especially because the quote is a sarcastic response to someone else's "word to the wise". laugh
June 24, 2011 1:32 PM
QUOTE:

I'd also ask for a definition of "clean eating".

Also being quoted makes me feel weird. Especially because the quote is a sarcastic response to someone else's "word to the wise". laugh

Too bad it's a brilliant quote and it's not going anywhere.

...Unless your wallet has something to say of the matter...
June 24, 2011 1:36 PM
How come no one ever appologizes for comming off tall?

just sayin'

*smirk*
  2056121
June 24, 2011 1:43 PM

Please explain how it's dirty. Since I assume you're going to say it's processed, please explain why that's remotely bad in a diet that favors whole, micronutrient-dense foods.

Please answer my question, how is it clean? Clean to me means not processed.
June 24, 2011 1:47 PM
QUOTE:

Please answer my question, how is it clean? Clean to me means not processed.


Well, if "clean" eating to you excludes food processing, that is, turning raw natural ingredients (in this case, milk or cheese, to some extent) into foods... then protein powders are processed and not clean.
Edited by Teemo On June 24, 2011 1:47 PM
June 24, 2011 1:48 PM
Garden of Life makes a Raw Protein powder- check it out!
June 24, 2011 1:51 PM
I know that there are clean foods that are somewhat processed, but my definition of clean is something that is close to nature that hasn't been taken out of it's natural state. Like comparing an apple to an apple pie. Obviously, the pie is processed. I just want to know how protein powder is made and what is in it.
June 24, 2011 1:52 PM
I don't think it is. I would say protein powders are processed food. I do very occasionally have them in an emergency, but I generally avoid them.
June 24, 2011 1:56 PM
QUOTE:

I know that there are clean foods that are somewhat processed, but my definition of clean is something that is close to nature that hasn't been taken out of it's natural state. Like comparing an apple to an apple pie. Obviously, the pie is processed. I just want to know how protein powder is made and what is in it.


That's fine. I'm answering your question! laugh

If that's your definition of clean foods then protein powders aren't clean foods. Whey protein is a by-product from milk/cheese which is then dried and possibly mixed with sweeteners, etc., and then put into your container for you.
June 24, 2011 2:21 PM
QUOTE:

Please answer my question, how is it clean? Clean to me means not processed.

Your question is based on a flawed premise.

Why is something processed inherently dirty? Are you defining dirty solely in regards to how it's made rather than what effect it has on our body and subsequent health?
June 24, 2011 11:09 PM
Since it starts off as the liquid that is drained off when turning milk into cheese if you eat cheese (to the OP where I saw cheese in the food diary) then whey powder shouldn't be a problem if cheese isn't "processed" then whey isn't either.
  3335912
June 25, 2011 4:28 AM
I wasn't trying to start a debate or claim that I was a 100% clean eater. I don't think I could be as I eat Greek Yogurt (I think is processed) for its high protein content. I stay away from cheese as much as possible as I do believe that to be highly processed. Since I think cheese is processed, then protein powder to me is processed. Not that I won't use it, but I feel that cheese and protein powder in its final stage has been very man-made. There is nothing that is really from a natural state, if that makes sense. I understand that protein powder is supposed to be a good source of protein, but it seems that there is so much involved in the making of it and hate the fact that most of it is made with artificial sweeteners. Something else I have stopped using because that surely can't be a clean food. This is just my opinion. I really just wanted peoples opinion on whether or not they thought protein powder was clean.
June 25, 2011 4:34 AM
I find the idea of "Raw" protein powder interesting. Where do you get it? Also, what about some of the ones sold that are organic? They might have fewer ingredients and be less processed....
  1722754
June 25, 2011 4:39 AM
QUOTE:

Garden of Life makes a Raw Protein powder- check it out!

Hmm, sounds interesting. Thanks.
June 25, 2011 9:22 AM
QUOTE:

I wasn't trying to start a debate or claim that I was a 100% clean eater. I don't think I could be as I eat Greek Yogurt (I think is processed) for its high protein content. I stay away from cheese as much as possible as I do believe that to be highly processed. Since I think cheese is processed, then protein powder to me is processed. Not that I won't use it, but I feel that cheese and protein powder in its final stage has been very man-made. There is nothing that is really from a natural state, if that makes sense. I understand that protein powder is supposed to be a good source of protein, but it seems that there is so much involved in the making of it and hate the fact that most of it is made with artificial sweeteners. Something else I have stopped using because that surely can't be a clean food. This is just my opinion. I really just wanted peoples opinion on whether or not they thought protein powder was clean.

That's all fair, but shouldn't your definition of clean vs. dirty be more based in regards to how our body handles those foods? There's nothing to suggest that processed food like protein powders or cheese is a remotely bad thing. Because of that, I'm curious as to why you still consider it to be dirty, or not clean, if it does not harm and can provide good nourishment in a diet. Just curious as to why you're defining clean and dirty by how things are made rather than how they affect our health.

Furthermore, you can find protein powders without added coloring or flavors or sweeteners.
June 27, 2011 7:41 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I wasn't trying to start a debate or claim that I was a 100% clean eater. I don't think I could be as I eat Greek Yogurt (I think is processed) for its high protein content. I stay away from cheese as much as possible as I do believe that to be highly processed. Since I think cheese is processed, then protein powder to me is processed. Not that I won't use it, but I feel that cheese and protein powder in its final stage has been very man-made. There is nothing that is really from a natural state, if that makes sense. I understand that protein powder is supposed to be a good source of protein, but it seems that there is so much involved in the making of it and hate the fact that most of it is made with artificial sweeteners. Something else I have stopped using because that surely can't be a clean food. This is just my opinion. I really just wanted peoples opinion on whether or not they thought protein powder was clean.

That's all fair, but shouldn't your definition of clean vs. dirty be more based in regards to how our body handles those foods? There's nothing to suggest that processed food like protein powders or cheese is a remotely bad thing. Because of that, I'm curious as to why you still consider it to be dirty, or not clean, if it does not harm and can provide good nourishment in a diet. Just curious as to why you're defining clean and dirty by how things are made rather than how they affect our health.

Furthermore, you can find protein powders without added coloring or flavors or sweeteners.


There's never been a clear distinction of what makes a food "dirty" or what makes it "clean". Most people would agree that tomatoes, cheese, olive oil, and flour/bread are clean but put them together and throw it in the oven for pizza and suddenly you have a dirty food.

If you choose the degree of processing as the defining characteristic, as OP has, then whey protein powder is probably somewhere in the middle. It's barely processed, just like with cheeses, but with certain protein powders sweeteners ARE added. That's probably enough using OP's definition to make it a dirty food though it does seem like a fairly arbitrary classification. Milk = clean. Milk + a teaspoon of sugar = dirty? That doesn't make a lot of common sense.

Anyway, I think OP has her answer. As to what most people think, I can only speak for myself and say I've never considered whether or not protein supplements were clean/dirty. Just like I don't really consider whether or not tea/coffee, or multivitamins, or TUMS is clean/dirty.
June 27, 2011 7:58 AM
Word to the wise, again, these two,,,,,,,, (be nice) people, like to argue anything that isn't USDA approved, is wrong. Don't worry about what they have to say on this or anyother subject.
June 27, 2011 8:11 AM
QUOTE:

Word to the wise, again, these two,,,,,,,, (be nice) people, like to argue anything that isn't USDA approved, is wrong. Don't worry about what they have to say on this or anyother subject.


Instead of actually reading and contributing to the forums, I see you've taken up the mantle of trolling. Please point out:

(1) Where in this thread I mentioned the USDA;
(2) Where in this thread I mentioned USDA approval;
(3) Where in this thread I argued that anything was wrong.

This is getting pathetic, freerange. I get it: you're a die-hard paleo fanatic and you don't like being proven wrong. That's fine. Let's at least confine your trolling to a single thread, shall we?

Or will you now follow me around these forums making baseless accusations and disparaging legitimate advice and answers?
June 27, 2011 8:12 AM
I don't worry too much about protein powder...I need it. While I eat primarily clean I'm also a vegetarian...and most veg products are processed.
I use Vega...which is vegan, non-soy, no artifical colors/flavors/sweetners.
We all have our downfalls...and if it's going to be protein powder then so be it...it's 100% better than having pure junk.
June 27, 2011 8:18 AM
QUOTE:

There's never been a clear distinction of what makes a food "dirty" or what makes it "clean". Most people would agree that tomatoes, cheese, olive oil, and flour/bread are clean but put them together and throw it in the oven for pizza and suddenly you have a dirty food.


Fan of JCD Fitness by any chance?

I agree though. I think the whole "dirty" v "clean" distinction in many cases is arbitrary and a bit pointless.

In fat loss terms at least a better way of looking at it would be nutrient density.

Reply

Message Boards » Food and Nutrition

Posts by members, moderators and admins should not be considered medical advice and no guarantee is made against accuracy.