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TOPIC: T or F? Al dente pasta is healthier?

 
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June 23, 2011 3:37 PM
I heard this and just curious if there's any truth to it- that cooking your pasta al dente ( which how i prefer it anyhow)
is actually the healthiest way to eat it- less starch= less carbs.
  6095546
June 23, 2011 3:39 PM
bump, I'd like to know as well
  2002808
June 23, 2011 3:41 PM
I don't know for sure, but since it is the same pasta before cooking, I don't see how leaving it in the water for a shorter period of time makes any difference at all. And even if it did, it would probably be very minute.

The best way to make it more healthy is to eat it with lean protein so the insulin spike is slower and less harmful. Meat sauce > marinara sauce.
June 23, 2011 3:41 PM
negative
June 23, 2011 3:41 PM
FALSE
grains are evil, period

*giggles maniacally and runs away*
June 23, 2011 3:42 PM
I doubt there's any truth to it, but if there was, I would think it would be the opposite. A good italian cook would kill you for rinsing pasta and washing away the starch that cooked out of the pasta.
Edited by misscristie On June 23, 2011 3:42 PM
  4123911
June 23, 2011 3:44 PM
QUOTE:

I doubt there's any truth to it, but if there was, I would think it would be the opposite. A good italian cook would kill you for rinsing pasta and washing away the starch that cooked out of the pasta.


And any good Italian cook will take some of that starchy pasta water and incorporate it into their sauce.
  4948047
June 23, 2011 3:44 PM
QUOTE:

FALSE
grains are evil, period

*giggles maniacally and runs away*



Evil? Wow. I enjoy those "evil" things everyday and still manage to lose weight and be healthy. SMH...
June 23, 2011 3:45 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I doubt there's any truth to it, but if there was, I would think it would be the opposite. A good italian cook would kill you for rinsing pasta and washing away the starch that cooked out of the pasta.


And any good Italian cook will take some of that starchy pasta water and incorporate it into their sauce.


That too!
  4123911
June 23, 2011 3:54 PM
Sounds like an older woman I worked with that said putting her snickers bar in the freezer made it less calories - lol

I highly doubt it - I have always cooked my pasta al dente as that is the way I was taught by my Italian Mom.

I never add any of the starchy water to my homemade sauce either BUT I have added water that I have boiled my potatoes in to make my meat or chicken gravy.
  4990358
June 23, 2011 5:16 PM
To add to the dialogue- I'm googling the subject now. I am finding some articles stating that it has something to do with the GI (glycemic index)- that cooking it al dente helps it NOT raise your glucose levels as quickly.

http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/tips/qt/What-Is-Al-Dente-Pasta.htm
Edited by Jill_newimprovedversion On June 23, 2011 5:17 PM
  6095546
June 24, 2011 3:59 AM
QUOTE:

To add to the dialogue- I'm googling the subject now. I am finding some articles stating that it has something to do with the GI (glycemic index)- that cooking it al dente helps it NOT raise your glucose levels as quickly.

http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/tips/qt/What-Is-Al-Dente-Pasta.htm


It is actually glycemic load. GI is the potential to raise blood sugar. GL is what actually happens to blood sugar when you eat that food. Al dente, being slightly less cooked, has a slightly lower GL than fully cooked pasta. This makes it slower to digest, slower to raise blood sugar, and may provide a longer lasting satiety than fully cooked pasta. Same caloric value though... GL is good to know because hunger and long lasting satiety is possible with lower GL foods, but counting calories is just as important...
  3596735
June 24, 2011 5:20 AM
I do log the calories according to the package.
I'm so glad I prefer it firm as opposed to "restaurant style"=soggy and limp.
Edited by Jill_newimprovedversion On June 24, 2011 5:21 AM
  6095546
June 24, 2011 5:22 AM
QUOTE:


It is actually glycemic load. GI is the potential to raise blood sugar. GL is what actually happens to blood sugar when you eat that food. Al dente, being slightly less cooked, has a slightly lower GL than fully cooked pasta. This makes it slower to digest, slower to raise blood sugar, and may provide a longer lasting satiety than fully cooked pasta. Same caloric value though... GL is good to know because hunger and long lasting satiety is possible with lower GL foods, but counting calories is just as important...



Oh, I'm so glad you explained that to me (us). That's very helpful in understanding it.
  6095546
June 24, 2011 6:16 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

To add to the dialogue- I'm googling the subject now. I am finding some articles stating that it has something to do with the GI (glycemic index)- that cooking it al dente helps it NOT raise your glucose levels as quickly.

http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/tips/qt/What-Is-Al-Dente-Pasta.htm


It is actually glycemic load. GI is the potential to raise blood sugar. GL is what actually happens to blood sugar when you eat that food. Al dente, being slightly less cooked, has a slightly lower GL than fully cooked pasta. This makes it slower to digest, slower to raise blood sugar, and may provide a longer lasting satiety than fully cooked pasta. Same caloric value though... GL is good to know because hunger and long lasting satiety is possible with lower GL foods, but counting calories is just as important...


Now ^this^ makes sense
  4123911

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