Message Boards » Fitness and Exercise

TOPIC: My knee is sore after running

 
Ic_disabled_photos
Topic has been inactive for 30 days or more and images have been disabled.
Display All Images
June 9, 2011 10:37 AM
I need advice for this problem: after jogging my right keen feels sore, the other knee is great, however I have no pain. Do I need to see a doctor or this is a common effect of jogging? I do not do a lot of running, about 20 to 30 min in a flat surface.
June 9, 2011 10:40 AM
What side of your knee hurts? Could be your IT band. It's very common in runners. What helped me was getting orthotics for my shoes.
  626786
June 9, 2011 10:41 AM
What kind of shoes are you using? If you haven't already, get fitted, make sure yours are the best for your foot / gait.
  3014172
June 9, 2011 10:41 AM
I had Runner's Knee a couple of years ago and what helped me was a fish oil supplement. It's a miracle pill and I'll never go without it now.
  296751
June 9, 2011 10:44 AM
Is it sore under the knee cap?? This used to happen to me when I ran distance. Does it stop hurting immediately after you are done running?? I read that this happens to a lot of women because of how our hips are wider and the way our foot hits the surface. I started taking glucosamine and it seemed to help a bit but it was still sore. I only do sprints now and don't do distance running and it doesn't give me any problems. I would see a doctor if you enjoy running (I hate it) and possibly a chiropractor. They can possibly realign your hips so you don't have the problem anymore. But I did read that this is very common in women (if it is under the knee cap and stops hurting when you are done running).
June 9, 2011 10:44 AM
You might have runner's knee aka chondromalacia patellae. You could go to a doctor and get it diagnosed but there isn't much he or she can do beyond giving you some good stretches. My advice is to ice it immediately after running. Stretching important. Also make sure you have good running shoes. That can make all the difference.
  3475568
June 9, 2011 10:47 AM
I would see a Dr just in case. The reason I say this is I had very seldom minor knee pain on occasion for years. When I say seldom I mean a couple times a year if that and it usually didn't last more then minutes. 8 weeks ago I was diagnosed with patella fibromyalgia. The problem escalated very quickly all of a sudden. I waited until it was a more serious issue to go to the Dr and now I am paying the price and have had to eliminate many things from my everyday life and workouts. Had I seen the Dr earlier I probably would have caught it soon enough that the medicine would have never let it get as far as it did. Now I have really build up the muscles around my knee and continue to take the meds. The good thing is the meds are not RX so they don't cost a bundle. I played volleyball for 15 years and that is what caused my problem.
June 9, 2011 10:52 AM
Before started this running adventure I got fit for running shoes in a specialized store, so I do think it is problem with the shoes. The problem with the hip alignment is a possibility!!!! My feet face out, as a result of my ballet training.
June 9, 2011 3:41 PM
Ouch... I feel your pain! Played volleyball all through high school—a sport that's hard on your joints for sure. My last season, I came down hard from a hit and bruised the top of my tibia really badly. Ever since then, whenever I do high impact exercises like running or jumping rope, my left knee feels a little tender afterward. I have good arch inserts in my shoes and am in good shape, it's just a side effect from an old injury. Running really puts a lot of stress on your joints—like your knees, ankles, and hips—especially when you do it every day. My solution has been to work out on an elliptical or bike, to give my knees a break from all of my body weight slamming down on top of them. Also, you might try increasing your magnesium and potassium intake (it will help for shin splits, which I've also had to endure ever since senior year volleyball). If you run outside, know that it's much better for your joints when you run on softer surfaces, like a track, instead of paved roads and concrete sidewalks. Concrete doesn't yield to your weight at all, therefore leaving it up to your body to absorb the shock of the impact of each step. Hope this helps you, and good luck!
June 10, 2011 12:15 PM
QUOTE:

Ouch... I feel your pain! Played volleyball all through high school—a sport that's hard on your joints for sure. My last season, I came down hard from a hit and bruised the top of my tibia really badly. Ever since then, whenever I do high impact exercises like running or jumping rope, my left knee feels a little tender afterward. I have good arch inserts in my shoes and am in good shape, it's just a side effect from an old injury. Running really puts a lot of stress on your joints—like your knees, ankles, and hips—especially when you do it every day. My solution has been to work out on an elliptical or bike, to give my knees a break from all of my body weight slamming down on top of them. Also, you might try increasing your magnesium and potassium intake (it will help for shin splits, which I've also had to endure ever since senior year volleyball). If you run outside, know that it's much better for your joints when you run on softer surfaces, like a track, instead of paved roads and concrete sidewalks. Concrete doesn't yield to your weight at all, therefore leaving it up to your body to absorb the shock of the impact of each step. Hope this helps you, and good luck!
June 10, 2011 12:16 PM
QUOTE:

Ouch... I feel your pain! Played volleyball all through high school—a sport that's hard on your joints for sure. My last season, I came down hard from a hit and bruised the top of my tibia really badly. Ever since then, whenever I do high impact exercises like running or jumping rope, my left knee feels a little tender afterward. I have good arch inserts in my shoes and am in good shape, it's just a side effect from an old injury. Running really puts a lot of stress on your joints—like your knees, ankles, and hips—especially when you do it every day. My solution has been to work out on an elliptical or bike, to give my knees a break from all of my body weight slamming down on top of them. Also, you might try increasing your magnesium and potassium intake (it will help for shin splits, which I've also had to endure ever since senior year volleyball). If you run outside, know that it's much better for your joints when you run on softer surfaces, like a track, instead of paved roads and concrete sidewalks. Concrete doesn't yield to your weight at all, therefore leaving it up to your body to absorb the shock of the impact of each step. Hope this helps you, and good luck!

Thanks for the inf.... I will try the Mg and K also the fish oil.

Reply

Message Boards » Fitness and Exercise

Posts by members, moderators and admins should not be considered medical advice and no guarantee is made against accuracy.