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TOPIC: To Use Protein or Not use Protein,Thats the ????

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May 15, 2011 5:26 PM
Hi there,
I have read several posts on here about people using Protein Powder while on a Healthy Diet. I have been debating whether
or not to start using Protein Powder and I was advised by a Medical Professional to NOT use Protein Powder.
I was told that using Protein Powder would actually cause me to gain weight rather then lose weight and that if I get
enough Protein from the foods I eat everyday that I should NOT be taking Protein Powder.

Protein Powder is geared more towards body builders and I am not a body builder so I don't know what the purpose of using
Protein Powder is when all i am doing is trying to lose weight (50 pounds). Just wanted to get some feedback on this
before I go out an waste money on Protein Powder.

Thanks
  6017255
May 15, 2011 5:30 PM
Protein is good after workouts, but you can get it through the foods you normally eat -- just make yourself a high-protein snack for after workouts. If you doctor advises you not to use protein powder, I would go with what he or she says.
  7277444
May 15, 2011 5:33 PM
I am starting a version of Ideal Protein - and it is all geared towards protein. I am using shakes that are less than 120 cals, less than 7g of carb and at least 15g of protein. I went to a meeting about Ideal Protein but I just can't afford it so I am starting my own version. According to their website:

Learn to live off of the body's own fat reserves. The body employs energy from three reserves: glycogen (carbohydrate), protein and fats. First from it’s simple and complex carbohydrate reserves and when depleted, turns simultaneously to its protein and fat reserves for energy. A person not in need of weight loss typically has approximately 1-2% of their body's reserves from carbs, approximately 19% from their muscle mass and 79% of their body reserves from fat.


Simple and complex carbohydrates can prevent weight loss. The body stores approximately three days worth of carbohydrates. Because of this, the Ideal Protein Weight Loss Method has a beginning and an end. Until 100% of the weight loss goal is achieved, we restrict sugars (simple and complex). Why? Because, as long as sugar is being consumed, the body is not burning fat. It's as simple as that. Remember, the first source of energy is derived from glycogen (carbohydrate) reserves. The main principle is to deplete the glycogen (carbohydrate) reserves completely in order to compel the body to turn to its fat reserve to burn calories.

How do we get the body to burn its fat reserves and not its muscle mass reserves, if both are depleted simultaneously? First, by providing the body with foods that have a high protein value, complete with 8 essential amino acids, 97% absorbable, which make them biologically-complete proteins.

Secondly, by supplementing with nutrient-rich supplements such as Natura Multi-Vita, Natura Calcium & Magnesium and Natura Potassium, key ingredients in muscle building and electrolytes to replace those normally found in foods restricted on the Ideal Protein protocol.

I am starting my plan tomorrow - we will see how it goes! Good luck on your weight loss journey!
  5716256
May 15, 2011 5:34 PM
I would say listen to your doctor. However, it will only make you gain if you are eating more calories than your body needs. You have to count it in your daily intake like everything else. I drink protein shakes alot and have done so since before I started losing weight and I think it has helped, not hurt me.
May 15, 2011 5:34 PM
MOST protein powders contain as much sugar as they do protein.

Your muscles need the protein after a workout to build muscle. Even if you don't want to be muscly, the most muscle you have, the more calories your body will burn during the day because it needs to keep that muscle active. It's great if you need a quick snack after a workout but personally, I'd rather cook up a couple of eggs.
May 15, 2011 5:34 PM
The advice from your medical professional sounds dead on. I wouldn't use a protein powder unless you are trying to seriously build muscle. Just make sure you get enough protein from your foods (not too hard to do that if you eat meats) and watch your overall calorie intake. (Protein has as many calories as sugar, so that's why it can make you gain weight).
May 15, 2011 5:35 PM
You would not be a body builder from using protein powder. In fact- its one of the hardest things for women to do!! Protein powder will also not cause you to gain weight- too many calories from crap food and not enough exercise will cause you to gain weight. I have a protein shake after my workouts with a fast digesting carb source. Protein feeds the muscles after working out- which is what you want because its the muscle that will burn more calories after you are working out-for the next 24-48 hours I believe. Look for one that has the lowest cholesterol/carbs/sugar. If you aren't comfortable with drinking them though, then don't.
May 15, 2011 5:35 PM
you don't have to add powder protein to your diet..

forget about the bodybuilding stuff.

You need high protein diet if your workout consist of primarily strength exercises. You need strength exercises because it's the best way to lose weight in the first place. you build muscles -> you increase metabolism -> your muscles grow -> which in turn increases metabolism -> fat burns faster and faster the more lean muscle mass your accumulate.
You need protein to do that.

Most of people doing heavy cardio and little strength exercises when trying to lose weight, which in my opinion should be quite the opposite.
Here is the article that explains my line of thought much better: http://www.crossfitsouthbay.com/2011/05/skinny-fat/
May 15, 2011 5:35 PM
I bought some protein powder today to have on days when I don't naturally get enough protein. But I've also been trying to work it in naturally protein rich foods. You should do what your doctor says.
May 15, 2011 5:36 PM
If your doctor recommened you not, I think I'd go with him/her. Was weight the only reason he/she said don't use it? Some folks have problems with their kidneys, etc.

After workouts protein is good, so your muscles have protein to build with. I watch my daily calories and work them in. EAS advantage has a low carb one I use. 17 grams of protein, about 3 carbs, and only 110 calories. I drinkk that on the way home from the gym, then have a light dinner after I shower.

Protein drinks can also be mixed with water instead of skim milk, which significantly reduces calories.

Hope this helps.flowerforyou
  4600265
May 15, 2011 5:38 PM
there is no need for people to use protein powder while on diets or as part of a 'healthy' diet. if you are a meat eater you get plenty if not too much already.

if you are a vegetarian like myself, i get plenty naturally anyways..

you only need 40-60 grams of protein a day...if you go over it just get stored as fat..

ps...unless you are a noob to working out or extremely obese you CAN NOT gain muscle on a calorie deficit..to gain muscle you need to eat calories..its NOT all about the protein, but a good mix of all the macros. studies have shown that excessive protein does NOTHING to build muscle while body building. men and women gain muscle at the same rate..men just gain more of it because they have testosterone. even if you do lift weights, you wont gain muscle unless you are eating a lot and eating healthy.
Edited by xraychick77 On May 15, 2011 5:41 PM
  2228488
May 15, 2011 5:41 PM
QUOTE:

there is no need for people to use protein powder while on diets or as part of a 'healthy' diet. if you are a meat eater you get plenty if not too much already.

if you are a vegetarian like myself, i get plenty naturally anyways..

you only need 40-60 grams of protein a day...if you go over it just get stored as fat..


it would only get stored as fat if you go over your daily calories limit.
calorie in -> calorie out.

you need more than 40-60 grams of protein if you are trying to build muscle mass, and it applies to both men and women.

40-60g would be enough otherwise.
Edited by dmanakho On May 15, 2011 5:41 PM
May 15, 2011 5:49 PM
Well I eat plent of protein and it certantly has not made me fat, lol.

Anyways, I would find out from your md why he/she suggested this.. Kidneys prexisting kidney problems can be a very good reason to limit / watch your intake..

Definatley stay away from the protein bars - most of them are filled with junk to keep shelf life.
Whey protein is good post workout.

I love cottage cheese (casein) - which is a slow digesting protein and takes about eight hours to be digested (feed during your longest fast of the day / sleep)
  3656285
May 15, 2011 5:52 PM
Whey protein is an excellent protein choice for individuals of all ages who value the role of a healthy diet in helping to maintain and improve their health. Whey protein isolate, the purest form available, is unsurpassed as a source of the essential amino acids required in the daily diet. Essential amino acids are the building blocks for healthy muscles, skin, nails and other body tissue.

The body requires more energy to digest protein than other foods (thermic effect) and as a result you burn more calories after a protein meal.
Whey protein isolate is pure protein with little to no fat or carbohydrates. It is a perfect complement to any low carbohydrate or low glycemic index diet plan.
Recent studies by Dr. Donald Layman, a professor at the University of Illinois, have highlighted the role of the essential amino acid leucine in improving body composition. High quality whey protein is rich in leucine to help preserve lean muscle tissue while promoting fat loss. Whey protein contains more leucine than milk protein, egg protein and soy protein.
Protein helps to stabilize blood glucose levels by slowing the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream. This in turn reduces hunger by lowering insulin levels and making it easier for the body to burn fat.
Whey protein contains bioactive components that help stimulate the release of two appetite-suppressing hormones: cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). In support of this, a new study found that whey protein had a greater impact on satiety than casein, the other protein in milk. Adding whey protein to a mid-day snack or beverage provides healthy energy and may help control food intake at the next meal.

The benefits of whey protein for women are many, beginning with the fact that it is recommended as a supplement for women in weight loss programs. This is because whey protein can:

■increase metabolic rates
■increase satiety
■increase lean muscle mass
■help to prevent osteoporosis
■create natural energy
  6602576
May 15, 2011 6:09 PM
WOW......Thanks for all the info and advice on this. i see alot of people have opinions on this topic.

1st off I don't have any Kidney/Medical Issues and I seem to get enough Protein at least according to the numbers on MFP
and I was told that drinking Protein Powder turns to fat and adds on weight as opposed to helping me lose the fat.
I have been trying to find a brand that the local stores carry such as Kroger,Walmart etc and didn't want to waste my money on it If its really NOT needed. At Kroger and Walmart I know they have the Whey Protein in huge containers.

I do eat the Protein bars but not everyday and I watch my calories everyday and on the weekends just depends on what I am doing.
I exercise everyday by either doing Aerobics,Treadmill,Indoor Walking Dvd's etc and I also go to the gym 2x a week to work on weight machines.

If it will benefit me in my weight loss then I would be happy to buy it and use. I know nothing about it or how it tastes etc etc
but I try not to waste money and in most cases I have seen the price is kind of exspensive in my opinion. I usually drink
a smoothie 1-2x a week for breakfast and adding Protein powder would be easy to do.
Edited by Calif_Girl67 On May 15, 2011 6:10 PM
  6017255
May 15, 2011 6:44 PM
QUOTE:

WOW......Thanks for all the info and advice on this. i see alot of people have opinions on this topic.

1st off I don't have any Kidney/Medical Issues and I seem to get enough Protein at least according to the numbers on MFP

MFP number's are for the average person. if you do strength exercises they are very low.

QUOTE:

and I was told that drinking Protein Powder turns to fat and adds on weight as opposed to helping me lose the fat.

well.. that's complete and total BS... it would only turn into fat if you eat more calories than you lose.

QUOTE:

I have been trying to find a brand that the local stores carry such as Kroger,Walmart etc and didn't want to waste my money on it If its really NOT needed. At Kroger and Walmart I know they have the Whey Protein in huge containers.
I do eat the Protein bars but not everyday and I watch my calories everyday and on the weekends just depends on what I am doing.


be careful with the protein bars. They usually have too many carbs than you need. YOu'd be better of getting carbs from fruits and veggies than protein bars. As much as i support protein powder, i try to stay away from those bars at all costs.

QUOTE:

I exercise everyday by either doing Aerobics,Treadmill,Indoor Walking Dvd's etc and I also go to the gym 2x a week to work on weight machines.

how intensive are your weight machines exercises? if you only do it moderately, then you probably don't need extra protein.
I'd suggest dump the machines and do free weights only 3 times a week 40 to 60 minutes intensive workouts... in such case, the powder protein would be quite beneficial for you.

QUOTE:

If it will benefit me in my weight loss then I would be happy to buy it and use. I know nothing about it or how it tastes etc etc
but I try not to waste money and in most cases I have seen the price is kind of exspensive in my opinion. I usually drink
a smoothie 1-2x a week for breakfast and adding Protein powder would be easy to do.

it might or might not benefit you... again, it all depends how much you are trying to build up the lean muscle.
protein powder can be beneficial for the weight loss, but only if you have the rest of your diet and exercises setup in a way that would benefit from the extra protein. It also depends where you are in your weight loss, what's your body fat percentage to choose the best combination of exercise and diet. This is where a good and knowledgable personal trainer comes handy.
Edited by dmanakho On May 15, 2011 6:46 PM
May 15, 2011 6:53 PM
dmanakho,

I am losing weight slowly which I am managing to keep off and am fine with. When I go to the gym I use there Eliptical,Exercise Bike an Leg Press,Ab Press and 1 other one so I am not lifting a huge amount of weight when I go to the gym, Just trying to
tone up other area's that I can't tone up at home since I do not have weight machines at home. Also like to mix it up a bit.
But at home I exercise everyday mostly in the evening M-F because I am working until 3pm.

So if I decided to try using Protein Powder, when is it beneficial to use, For Breakfast or after wroking out? If using it for
Breakfast, does it still benefit my body even after working out if I don't drink it again after a workout? Just curious.

Has anyyone tried the Jillian Michaels Whey Protein? If so is it good,low cal?
  6017255
May 15, 2011 7:13 PM
slow is the healthy way to go...

use protein powder after exercise... try to use natural protein sources for breakfast.

I usually get my breakfast protein from sandwich meat - chicken, turkey or lean ham, eggs and sprouted bread.

there are so many theories behind when to use protein... i won't even go there... at the end it's an experiment and you should experiment until you find what works for you.
May 15, 2011 7:26 PM
I am a vegetarian and ultra marathoner and was afraid I wasn't getting enough protein so I used to use protein powders. After tracking for a while, I realized I was fine so decided to only use it occasionally. I now use L Glutamine powder for recovery instead.

I think it's personal preference and what works for you. On one hand I would say listen to your doctor, but on the other hand, unless he is a sports medicine doc, he may not really know and be giving pat answers.

Good luck!!
  7499825
May 15, 2011 7:28 PM
BTW... If you do use protein powders (or any powdered supplement for that matter), use water. It sometimes takes some getting used to but you can save a ton of calories by eliminating juices or whatever type of milk you may use. ;)
  7499825
May 15, 2011 8:12 PM
I’d recommend start to read or research whatever you want to call it. You don’t have to be an expert on the matter, but you will get to know a lot about food and nutrition and exercise.

I use protein powder to supplement my diet. I’m doing an low carbohydrate diet and letting my body use it’s stored carbo’s(fat). It’s working pretty well, actually I’ve been eating low carbohydrates for a few years now with no ill effects.

While nothing against the medical field, but family doctors aren’t specialized, they are general medicine. I actually answer dietary questions for my family doctor. He’ knows general medicine and I told him 1.) About this website(MFP) 2.) About the protein powder I use(Jay Robb ZERO fat 25G of protein and 110 calories) I would recommend going to a nutritionist or a dietician for good advice about diets and nutrition, your Doctor should of recommended that you see one. (Unless he’s is like the Doctor I FIRED for letting his ego getting in the way and not my well being. You can do that you know and I do.) [Read a book called “The Empowered Patient” by Elizabeth Cohen]{That’s a whole different topic though}

50% of my diet is protein of some sort and only 35% is carbo’s. My diet is set at 1600 a day.

Oh and a common misnomer about protein, the body can only assimilate 12-22 grams every hour to 90 minutes. Then you can reload up on protein again.

I would also recommend on doing some kind of exercising. Exercising of some sort is almost mandatory, losing weight can be done without exercising, but it will take at least twice as long and not as effective.

Definitely exercising can be as simple as walking, which is always a good one. Joining a gym is great(don’t let it intimidate you, they’re all people with the same goals. To get in better shape!) As soon as you get used to going there, it is a great place to learn more “Tricks of the trade” on getting in shape. Treadmill, stationary bike, elliptical machine, swimming, spinning classes, aerobics(Actually a good place to start, if you’re not used to exercising)

A link about nutrition
http://exercise.about.com/cs/nutrition/a/lowcarb.htm

A link about dieting
http://exercise.about.com/sitesearch.htm?q=What+is+a+proper+diet%3F&SUName=exercise

How much protein do you need?
http://exercise.about.com/cs/nutrition/a/protein.htm

The truth about “Low carb diets”
http://exercise.about.com/cs/nutrition/a/lowcarb.htm

Another link about nutrition
http://exercise.about.com/od/nutrition/Nutrition.htm

I use About.com a lot for research.

If you wondering who the hell is this guy and why is he telling me about diets and HE’S on this site, check my bio out if you want, ……or not.

I’d recommend doing a lot of your own research, and then recheck that source.

Good luck in reaching your goals!

Dustin
  4822665
May 15, 2011 8:22 PM
Check out Jay Robb WHEY protein powder Zero Fat, 110 calories, ZERO sugar and 25 Grams of protein.
  4822665
May 16, 2011 6:39 PM
I saw Jay Robb Whey protein at krogers today and its really pricey. I decided to give it a shot so
I bought ESA 100% Whey Protein-Vanilla flavor and used it in a smoothie tonight. The strange
thing is that shortly after drinking it I got a really bad headache and I drank it after i worked out. Does this stuff
cause you to have a Headache? I still have it too. :(
  6017255
May 16, 2011 6:53 PM
I just Read on the internet that WHey Protein can cause headaches and I have had one ever since drinking it. That
sucks.... I don't want to have a headache every nigh from drinking Whey Protein. I wish someone would of
mentioned that aspect of it. Maybe i should only use 1/2 of a scoop instead?
Edited by Calif_Girl67 On May 16, 2011 6:54 PM
  6017255
May 16, 2011 7:46 PM
I've been drinking WHEY protein for well over a year and haven't had a headach. I can't see why WHEY would give you a headach, it's drived from cheese.
Not that I don't believe you, but from my experence I've never had ANY troubles and I drink at least three if not four whey shakes a day. Mostly for medical reason's(Healing a wound).

Now for exercise reasons.

If you're Lactose intolerance I can understand.

I use Jay Robb WHEY protein powder, and I really like the vanilla protein shakes, kind of idicting. Ha, there are worse things by far(110 calories zero fat).
  4822665

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