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TOPIC: The Salt Detox Diet - The Secret to Skinny

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May 11, 2011 8:45 AM
I found some very helpful tips from this book: "The Secret to Skinny: How Salt Makes You Fat, and the 4-Week Plan to Drop a Size and Get Healthier with Simple Low-Sodium Swaps" by The Lakatos sisters (a/k/a “The Nutrition Twins“) wink

The amount of sodium in the diet is an old issue that is getting new attention with those in the field of nutrition and health. Of particular interest is the connection between sodium and obesity. A current theory is that a dangerous level of salt toxicity can cause the body to produce more fat cells. And those sodium toxic fat cells can be denser and more difficult to get rid of.

The medical community has linked an excess of sodium in the diet with hypertension and heart disease for decades. Now it is also clear that when salt builds up to toxic levels it can cause and contribute to stomach cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, and a number of different maladies.

Salt toxicity is a growing health concern for Americans because of the amount of salt that is being used by food manufacturers and large restaurant chains as a preservative. Because diners are not aware of the “hidden salt” in their processed foods and menu selections, they are making uninformed choices that have dangerous consequences. The cumulative effects of sodium overconsumption is starting to show up in national disease statistics.

A book which addresses the dangers of salt and how to effectively do a salt detox was written by New York dieticians Tammy Lakatos Shames and Lyssie Lakatos. The Lakatos sisters (a/k/a “The Nutrition Twins“) have found in their nutrition practice that the sodium issue is becoming so huge, that unless American dieters first go through salt detox, most will continue to get huge, despite their best efforts.

Recognizing that it can be treacherous for Americans to navigate their way through the minefield of sodium-rich foods offered to them, The Nutrition Twins give dozens of simple ideas that help their clients and readers to a salt detox diet and achieve a healthy salt balance. Here are some of the “Twin Tips” that are included in their book, “The Secret to Skinny”:

* Unsalted pistachios are the “skinny nut” because they are high in protein, fiber, and healthy fat. Buy them in the shell because the work it takes to eat them will make it hard to eat too many. (Avoid the roasted and salted pistachios completely!)
* “Low fat” does not mean “low sodium.” Often low fat and no-fat products have even more sodium and sugar to compensate for the flavor that is lost when the fat is removed.
* Salt is sometimes hidden in other ingredients. Products that contain disodium phosphate, monosodium glutamate (MSG), sodium alginate, and sodium nitrate (or nitrite) contain more sodium than you think.
* Swap your sodium-rich breakfast cereal for a bowl of oatmeal with fresh fruit. This will completely eliminate salt from your breakfast and leave you feeling less bloated all day.
* Canned vegetables can make you fat because of the extremely high amount of sodium. Always rinse canned vegetables instead of consuming the salty liquid they’re packed in.
* Parsley is not just a garnish, it’s a natural diuretic. Add it to your recipes for eating, not just for looking pretty on your plate.
* Instead of eating greasy salty popcorn, eat air-popped popcorn seasoned with cayenne powder, onion powder, garlic powder, chili powder, coriander, or chili powder for a flavorful treat instead.
* Don’t forget that dairy products contain sodium too. Read the labels carefully because sometimes low fat and no fat versions have the most sodium and will make you retain water weight.
* After eating a sodium-rich meal (like Chinese, for example) you can cure a “salt hangover” by drinking 2 cups of green tea and eating 4 dried plums to flush the salt out of your system more quickly.
Edited by getfitdiva On May 11, 2011 8:56 AM
  3466796
May 11, 2011 8:53 AM
Bump!!!
May 11, 2011 8:54 AM
Thanks this is great information!
  2092779
May 11, 2011 8:54 AM
Dried plums? My Grandma used to call those prunes, LOL. You know how those help you detox, right...
May 11, 2011 8:54 AM
SUPER interesting!! Thank you for posting this! When I first started on MFP, I had absolutely NO idea how effective sodium was in making me feel like general poo (not to mention look like it too with the bloating).
  450942
May 11, 2011 8:55 AM
Great information!! Thanks for posting this.
  3387541
May 11, 2011 8:57 AM
I would love to hear other tips!
  397159
May 11, 2011 8:57 AM
QUOTE:

Dried plums? My Grandma used to call those prunes, LOL. You know how those help you detox, right...


We always called them prunes too, and.... oh yeah! LOL.
May 11, 2011 8:58 AM
thank you for posting!
May 11, 2011 8:58 AM
This is very helpful! i really appreciate this!
  3888775
May 11, 2011 9:01 AM
Awesome!! Thank you!!
May 11, 2011 9:03 AM
Question: So is staying at or under the sodium level that MFP gives you appropriate for losing weight and maintaining a healthy lifestyle?
  6905165
May 11, 2011 9:03 AM
Bump!
May 11, 2011 9:08 AM
QUOTE:

Question: So is staying at or under the sodium level that MFP gives you appropriate for losing weight and maintaining a healthy lifestyle?


Since I was told in 2010 I inherited high blood pressure from my father's side of the family, it has been a struggle to keep my sodium levels low. The maximum daily sodium levels changed often. Here is what mayoclinic.com suggested limits - MFP sets it to 2500mg as a default.

Sodium: How much do you need?

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting sodium to less than 2,300 mg a day — or 1,500 mg if you're age 51 or older, or if you are black, or if you have high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease.

Keep in mind that these are upper limits, and less is usually best, especially if you're sensitive to the effects of sodium. If you aren't sure how much sodium your diet should include, talk to your doctor.
Sodium: Main dietary sources

The average American gets about 3,400 mg of sodium a day — much more than recommended. To help keep your sodium consumption in check, you need to know where the sodium comes from. Here are the main sources of sodium in a typical diet:

* Processed and prepared foods. The vast majority of sodium in the typical American diet comes from foods that are processed and prepared. These foods are typically high in salt, which is a combination of sodium and chloride, and in additives that contain sodium. Processed foods include bread, prepared dinners like pasta, meat and egg dishes, pizza, cold cuts and bacon, cheese, soups, and fast foods.
* Natural sources. Some foods naturally contain sodium. These include all vegetables and dairy products such as milk, meat and shellfish. While they don't have an abundance of sodium, eating these foods does add to your overall sodium intake. For example, 1 cup (237 milliliters) of low-fat milk has about 107 mg of sodium.
* In the kitchen and at the table. Many recipes call for salt, and many people also salt their food at the table. Condiments may also contain sodium. One tablespoon (15 milliliters) of soy sauce, for example, has about 1,000 mg of sodium.
Edited by getfitdiva On May 11, 2011 9:10 AM
  3466796
May 11, 2011 9:11 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Dried plums? My Grandma used to call those prunes, LOL. You know how those help you detox, right...


We always called them prunes too, and.... oh yeah! LOL.


LMBO! YES I would say prunes - oh yeah get you just right!
  3466796
May 11, 2011 9:16 AM
bump!
  1509235
May 11, 2011 9:16 AM
bump
  5322775
May 11, 2011 9:28 AM
THANKS!!!
  3666264
May 11, 2011 9:30 AM
bump
May 11, 2011 9:31 AM
bump
May 11, 2011 9:36 AM
interesting. im going to save this.
May 11, 2011 9:47 AM
BUMP!
  5278140
May 11, 2011 10:16 AM
Awesome. My mom has 3rd stage kidney disease (kidneys control bllod pressure) and high blood pressure so she has been on a 2000/day sodium count or under. Not an easy task if you actually read every lable and cook salt free. Very very difficult. I spent the las @ 8 months cooking with/for her and shopping and wow, there is sodium in everything. Most canned frozen and prepackaged foods are off limits, processed foods are out, deli meats and cheeses out, even shellfish is difficult. I now have high bllod pressure(minimal) and decided to head off the path my mom is on so I now attempt the lower sodium diet, but it's hard on the go and when you want a quick easy dinner. Doing the best I can. This info was great to see here in MFP. Thank you.
May 11, 2011 10:37 AM
Great information. Thanks for posting.
May 11, 2011 10:42 AM
QUOTE:

Awesome. My mom has 3rd stage kidney disease (kidneys control bllod pressure) and high blood pressure so she has been on a 2000/day sodium count or under. Not an easy task if you actually read every lable and cook salt free. Very very difficult. I spent the las @ 8 months cooking with/for her and shopping and wow, there is sodium in everything. Most canned frozen and prepackaged foods are off limits, processed foods are out, deli meats and cheeses out, even shellfish is difficult. I now have high bllod pressure(minimal) and decided to head off the path my mom is on so I now attempt the lower sodium diet, but it's hard on the go and when you want a quick easy dinner. Doing the best I can. This info was great to see here in MFP. Thank you.


I didn't start thinking about the impacts of sodium until I joined MFP and really got a revelation when I watch a Dr. Oz episode one day. I was a little scared at all the things that can effect me as a person with high blood pressure. Glad you found this info helpful!
  3466796

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