Message Boards » Fitness and Exercise

TOPIC: Is it normal to gain weight when you first start working out

« Prev 1 3
« Prev 1 3
 
Ic_disabled_photos
Topic has been inactive for 30 days or more and images have been disabled.
Display All Images
May 2, 2011 7:09 AM
For the past two weeks Ive been working out 6 days a week (sometimes twice a day), Ive been eating healthy, staying under calorie goal, and Ive gain a pound and a half! I don't think my measurements have changed either. Im beyond frustrated! Is this normal? Did it happen to you? If it is, how long does it take before the weight starts dropping?
Edited by timeforme23 On May 2, 2011 7:12 AM
May 2, 2011 7:15 AM
Yes, yes, yes! It takes about 2 weeks. Check this article, it helped me not lose focus: http://www.dailyspark.com/blog.asp?post=why_the_scale_goes_up_when_you_start_a_new_workout_plan
  1351274
May 2, 2011 7:19 AM
You will gain weight if you increae strength exercises and that will build muscle and burn fat when you don't exercise... takes a week or two to notice a difference. You will also gain weight if you don't eat enough to fuel your body so make sure you are eating back your exercise calories. Lastly, you will gain weight if you stress yourself.... you need to give your body a rest to repair itself, you can go for walks, but I would steer away from any strength training or intense cardio for two days a week.

I know what's worked for me. It only took me 2 months to lose my last 8 pounds by incorporating 30 minute daily walks into my usual 5 day a week strength/cardio routine, eating my exercise calories, and giving my body some vacation days including a full 7-8 hours of sleep.
May 2, 2011 7:22 AM
It's most likely water weight.

It'll start coming off soon.
May 2, 2011 7:33 AM
This actually just happened to me 2 weeks ago. I just started working out (6 days a week/sometimes twice) and I gained 2lbs the first week. Needless to say, I was devestated. tongue But, while I am interested in dropping pounds, I'm just as interested in leading a healthy lifestyle, so it didnt deter me (if anything, it really kicked my butt into gear) and I dropped those 2lbs this week. I plan to continue that trend. bigsmile
May 2, 2011 7:34 AM
very very normal if you are new to working out. See below from beachbody.com

The temporary weight gain explained:
When someone starts a new exercise program, they often experience muscle soreness. The more intense and "unfamiliar" the program, the more intense the muscle soreness. This soreness is most prevalent 24 to 48 hours after each workout. In the first few weeks of a new program, soreness is the body trying to "protect and defend" the effected or targeted tissue. Exercise physiologists refer to this as delayed-onset muscle soreness, or DOMS.

This type of soreness is thought to be caused by tissue breakdown or microscopic tears in muscle tissue. When this happens the body protects the tissue. The muscle becomes inflamed and slightly swollen with fluid retention. This temporary retention of fluid can result in a 3- to 4-pound weight gain within a few weeks of a new program. Keep in mind that muscle soreness is not necessarily a reflection of how hard you worked. In fact, some people feel no signs of muscle soreness, yet will experience the muscle protection mechanisms of water retention and slight swelling.
January 24, 2013 12:26 AM
I know this is a late post, but thank god I found it!

I have had the same issue, and was starting to worry :-)

Now I feel better and will just keep at it....
April 14, 2013 8:02 AM
Same here:)
May 5, 2013 8:59 AM
QUOTE:

very very normal if you are new to working out. See below from beachbody.com

The temporary weight gain explained:
When someone starts a new exercise program, they often experience muscle soreness. The more intense and "unfamiliar" the program, the more intense the muscle soreness. This soreness is most prevalent 24 to 48 hours after each workout. In the first few weeks of a new program, soreness is the body trying to "protect and defend" the effected or targeted tissue. Exercise physiologists refer to this as delayed-onset muscle soreness, or DOMS.

This type of soreness is thought to be caused by tissue breakdown or microscopic tears in muscle tissue. When this happens the body protects the tissue. The muscle becomes inflamed and slightly swollen with fluid retention. This temporary retention of fluid can result in a 3- to 4-pound weight gain within a few weeks of a new program. Keep in mind that muscle soreness is not necessarily a reflection of how hard you worked. In fact, some people feel no signs of muscle soreness, yet will experience the muscle protection mechanisms of water retention and slight swelling.


THANK YOU!!!!

This happens every time I've started a new exercise program with weight loss and in past has deterred me. This time I'm more focused and intent, so I'm not letting it, but I still wanted to understand WHY?!?!

Thanks again for the knowledge.
  39829604
June 23, 2013 12:43 PM
I'm so glad that I saw this post! I weighed in today and gained exactly three pounds after starting water aerobics and going 3 days this week. I have never burned so many calories in my life, so imagine my disappointment when I stepped on the scales. My WW leader assured me that it was very normal when beginning a workout regiment. I wasn't 100% convinced smile until readng this. Good info! smile
June 23, 2013 12:43 PM
Yes.
  24379443
June 23, 2013 12:45 PM
It is very normal. Don't worry it will be worth it!
  28369195
June 23, 2013 12:48 PM
Muscles are heavier than fat, so yes, it's normal for the scales to go up a bit. Try measuring yourself for a second reference, it'll most likely show that you toned up and lost inches even if the scales don't budge.
  41174559
June 23, 2013 12:48 PM
Yes it's normal for me, the two-week weight gain
I've notice it several times
:-)
Don't overdo it , but keep in keeping on
June 23, 2013 12:51 PM
Yes, it takes me about a month of gaining and losing the same 5 pounds to have new weight loss and start losing steadily. Taking measurements help me see I am making progress regardless of what the scale says. Just don't measure right after a workout sinceyour muscles retain the most water then.
June 23, 2013 3:06 PM
So glad this post was bumped up! I just started working out again a week ago, have been absolutely meticulous about calories (eating my exercise calories back, as well) and was a little bummed that I gained weight. Water retention makes complete sense, though, especially considering the shock my body must be in from sudden heavy lifting.
Edited by MsEndomorph On June 23, 2013 3:06 PM
  37785016
June 24, 2013 5:53 AM
Weight fluctuation is very common. Don't worry about it. I posted the same question in mfp forum when I was just started using mfp. My weight fluctuate from 1-4 lbs. Its just water weight. It will go away in 1-2 days. If you had done some weight lifting, it could be the muscles weight that you gain.
  32415724
June 24, 2013 6:09 AM
QUOTE:

Muscles are heavier than fat, so yes, it's normal for the scales to go up a bit. Try measuring yourself for a second reference, it'll most likely show that you toned up and lost inches even if the scales don't budge.


Ya....not 2lbs of muscle in 2 weeks.

Most likely water retention for muscle repair.
August 31, 2013 12:35 PM
Needed to read this today. Just started some classes at the YMCA. I obviously get too scale obsessed.
September 16, 2013 10:42 AM
I feel so much better after reading this post! I just started going to the gym daily (sometimes twice a day) and counting every calorie and when I got on the scale today, I had gained almost five pounds! safe to say I was freaking out. I know I shouldn't obsess over every pound, but it's hard not to!
September 20, 2013 10:14 AM
Wow! I just started working out and I've put on 5.6 pounds! I'm devastated!!!! So i'll keep an eye one it and will post again next week to see if it starts leveling out.
September 20, 2013 10:16 AM
drink a crap ton of water and that will help release any water retention...
October 12, 2013 3:50 PM
QUOTE:

very very normal if you are new to working out. See below from beachbody.com

The temporary weight gain explained:
When someone starts a new exercise program, they often experience muscle soreness. The more intense and "unfamiliar" the program, the more intense the muscle soreness. This soreness is most prevalent 24 to 48 hours after each workout. In the first few weeks of a new program, soreness is the body trying to "protect and defend" the effected or targeted tissue. Exercise physiologists refer to this as delayed-onset muscle soreness, or DOMS.

This type of soreness is thought to be caused by tissue breakdown or microscopic tears in muscle tissue. When this happens the body protects the tissue. The muscle becomes inflamed and slightly swollen with fluid retention. This temporary retention of fluid can result in a 3- to 4-pound weight gain within a few weeks of a new program. Keep in mind that muscle soreness is not necessarily a reflection of how hard you worked. In fact, some people feel no signs of muscle soreness, yet will experience the muscle protection mechanisms of water retention and slight swelling.



Thanks for the info!! :D
October 12, 2013 3:59 PM
When I started T25 my weight went up but everyone was noticing I was getting smaller. Dont let it put you off and there are many other ways of measuring success.
  21495424
October 12, 2013 4:01 PM
QUOTE:

Muscles are heavier than fat...


lolololol

muscle is more dense than fat. there's a difference.

Reply

Message Boards » Fitness and Exercise

Posts by members, moderators and admins should not be considered medical advice and no guarantee is made against accuracy.