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TOPIC: dry pasta measurement vs cooked pasta - barilla plus? help!

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March 29, 2011 5:03 AM
Hi everyone!

So last night we had Barilla Plus Penne for dinner....i measured out one cup exactly of cooked pasta..one cup is 8 oz right! So when i entered it into MFP - turns out to be 840 calories....OMG! So i am thinking it must be a dry measurement. Does anyone know the correct answer for how much cooked pasta is per cup? I have researched a little on the web and found conflicting answers.
Thanks in advance for your help! I almost choked when I saw 840 come up on my food journal...arrrrrrgh!

noway
  5096930
March 29, 2011 5:06 AM
I think when you are reading 8 oz that is in weight??? 1 c of cooked noodles should not weigh that much...Im not positive, but i think thats what it is?
March 29, 2011 5:06 AM
You generally measure pasta before you cook it. I just weigh it dry on my food scale.

So if you are cooking for your family, try making your portion in a smaller pot. After you cook it, you can measure it if you want to see how much dry pasta = cooked pasta. Once you've done that a few times, you'll have a good estimate of how to translate dry to cooked measurements.
March 29, 2011 5:06 AM
I'm really curious about this too!!! The box's nutritional info lists the serving size as dry pasta, it's very annoying!!!
  4993078
March 29, 2011 5:06 AM
i'm interested to see what people have to say on this as well. I've pretty much cut pasta off my menu because it has alot of calories.
March 29, 2011 5:07 AM
Depending on the type of pasta, 2oz dry will generally give you about 1 cup cooked.
  2742205
March 29, 2011 5:09 AM
I have posted a few topics about this as well lol and what ive been told is that pasta doubles when you cook it. So for example 1/2 cup dry comes out to 1 cup cooked.
  465121
March 29, 2011 5:10 AM
2oz dry is about equivalent to 1/2 cup dry, which doubles to about 1 cup when cooked.
March 29, 2011 5:11 AM
A lot of pasta packets with the nutritional value will say something like 75g dry makes up 150g cooked. (This is an example and not an accurate measurement.) So if your weighing out cooked pasta, look on the pack to see how much dried would make that much.
  3411672
March 29, 2011 5:12 AM
I got to test this out the other night-- I measured out 8oz dry angel hair pasta for my family of 4 and it was about 1c cooked per person.

And BTW I found this link if it helps any on different kinds of pasta shapes....

http://www.ilovepasta.org/cooking.html
  4653903
March 29, 2011 5:12 AM
Uncooked is the figure they give you on the box. Your weight will vary depending on how long you cook it (water absorption) and the type of pasta. Experiment a little and cook your serving separately a few times and you will know how much your pasta will net cooked.
March 29, 2011 5:13 AM
2oz is about 1 cup. And that is with most pastas
  4511908
March 29, 2011 6:05 AM
QUOTE:

You generally measure pasta before you cook it. I just weigh it dry on my food scale.

So if you are cooking for your family, try making your portion in a smaller pot. After you cook it, you can measure it if you want to see how much dry pasta = cooked pasta. Once you've done that a few times, you'll have a good estimate of how to translate dry to cooked measurements.


I'm going to try this next time cause I have always wondered myself.
  3978331
March 29, 2011 6:39 AM
QUOTE:

You generally measure pasta before you cook it. I just weigh it dry on my food scale.

So if you are cooking for your family, try making your portion in a smaller pot. After you cook it, you can measure it if you want to see how much dry pasta = cooked pasta. Once you've done that a few times, you'll have a good estimate of how to translate dry to cooked measurements.


Yup - if you really want to know for sure - measure out 2 oz. dry and cook it in a seperate pot. I did this and found that 2 oz of dry pasta, came to a heaping cup cooked for one pasta, and an even cup cooked for another type. I'd say in general (if you can't be more precise) 1 cup cooked = 2 oz dry - on average. But if you want to be more accurate, measure it dry and cook it seperate from the family pasta.
  2763356
March 29, 2011 9:02 AM
Here is what I found on the internet:

Calories in 1 Cup Cooked Pasta/Calories
Pasta, Cannelloni /170
Pasta, Gnocchi /175
Pasta, Lasagne /180
Pasta, Macaroni /170
Pasta, Spaghetti /170
Pasta, Spaghetti, whole wheat /165
Pasta, Tagliatelle /185
Pasta, Vermicelli/ 170
  917959
March 29, 2011 2:08 PM
QUOTE:

Here is what I found on the internet:

Calories in 1 Cup Cooked Pasta/Calories
Pasta, Cannelloni /170
Pasta, Gnocchi /175
Pasta, Lasagne /180
Pasta, Macaroni /170
Pasta, Spaghetti /170
Pasta, Spaghetti, whole wheat /165
Pasta, Tagliatelle /185
Pasta, Vermicelli/ 170

thanks so much for this !!! smile
  5096930
March 31, 2011 1:16 PM
I got a call back from Barilla' customer service. They said that 3/4 cup of dry pasta equals 2 ounces. They also said that 3/4 cup dry would cook up to 1 1/8 cups. I called asking specifically about whole grain rotinni but, can't imagine there's a lot of difference in the pasta varieties. Pasta nutritional info is pretty poor on the box regardless of the manufacturer. You can google dry to cooked conversions for some help too.
March 31, 2011 1:43 PM
bump
  4398025
March 31, 2011 2:02 PM
OK, the first thing to realise is that there is a difference between volume and weight. Unfortunately, in the US the system of measurements that is used makes it really so much harder to wrap one's head around it. I think it must make you guys (I'm originally European and have grown up with g and ml) really really good at arithmetic on the average. But it can be an obstacle to understanding.

One problem is that there are oz for weight and (fl) oz for volume. 1 oz = 28 g and 1 fl oz = 28 ml(*). As 1 ml of water weights approximately 1 g (very very close, depending on pressure and temperature), the two are equivalent for fluids like water.

However, pasta (dry or cooked) are very different from water!

A cup is a volume measure, and the same as 8 fl oz. So half a cup of water would be 4 fl oz which weigh 4 oz. But half a cup of dry pasta would be a LOT less.

Some say a portion of dry pasta is half a cup, but again that depends a lot on the shape of the pasta. Try measuring half a cup of dry spaghetti, especially the original extra-long ones! It's more precise to go by weight anyway, because whatever the shape, the same weight of the same type of pasta (same brand/variety) always would have the same number of calories whether you look at spaghetti, farfalle, rotini, fusili, penne, whatever.

So let's say a portion (a reasonable-sized one, though a lot less than I used to eat to be honest blushing ) is 56g (that is, 2 oz). That is, dry. Once you cook it, it'll *approximately* double in weight and volume, but that again depends on the shape and on how much water your specific type of noodle absorbes in the cooking process.

That's where the "1 cup cooked" comes from -- that's some middle-of-the-road value. To be honest, it's too imprecise for me, so I weigh my pasta. It'll be probably approximately 4 oz in weight (if it doubles from 2 oz). NOT 8 oz like a cup of water!

And I weigh dry, and again cooked when I use leftovers, using an approximate factor of 2 (1 portion = 2 oz dry = approx. 4 oz cooked).

(*) Or 30 ml for US fluid oz! There's also imperial fl oz, which are again different, but let's forget about the difference here.
Edited by taletreader On March 31, 2011 2:03 PM
  2594277
March 31, 2011 3:30 PM
I came across this issue too when I first started being precise about how much pasta I ate. I would measure the pasta (dry) in 1/4 cup (which is 2 oz.) and couldn't believe how little it was. Then one day I decided to try weighing it and realized that 2 oz. of the rotini I was using was more like 3/4 cup dry. However, due to its shape, I'm sure elbows would fit in a smaller cup. Therefore, in regards to figuring out how much is a serving, it is better to weigh it, at least to start with. Then you will be able to figure out what size cup would accurately measure it in the future.
March 31, 2011 3:33 PM
If after you cooked it you ate a serving of one cup (roughlty the size of your fist) that should be approximately one serving size - and if memory serves, that's about 210 calories for Barilla Plus.
  4622025
March 31, 2011 3:40 PM
210 calories for 1 cup of cooked Barilla Plus Penne.
  5723871
January 26, 2012 1:33 PM
OK, MFP PEOPLE!! HELP HAS ARRIVED. I got so frustrated with pasta measurements that, after reading this post, I set out to discover the truth for myself.

Barilla Spaghetti. Not plus, not whole wheat, just regular, plain old spaghetti. Measure out 2 oz DRY on your food scale. Boil it, and measure it. It will be one cup of cooked pasta.

2 oz dry OR 1 cup cooked Barilla spaghetti contains 200 calories, 1 gram of fat, 42 grams of carbs, and 7 grams of protein.

Now you can have your pasta, and eat it, too!!!
June 7, 2012 9:20 AM
This is exactly what I'm eating now! Have you ever seen one of those pasta measuring tools? It has a hole that you can bundle the pasta through and for example, the littlest circle says 1 oz, the next is 2 oz, and so on. When I use the 2 oz one, it seems like more than 1 cup. Any idea if these tools are accurate?
  19103674
December 7, 2012 8:23 PM
I know this is old but guys, 1 cup is 8 FLUID ounces which is a measure of volume (how much space something takes up). All liquids take up the same amount of space so it's easy to measure them like this. 1 cup of jelly takes up just amount of space as 1 cup of water . 8 fluid ounces of water actually weighs roughly 8.3 oz. Water takes up one cup of space (8fluid oz) to equal to 8.3 oz in weight. But. Food is measured by weight. Not all foods are the same size and shape so you have to find their weight. Think about it. Weigh a 1/4 cup of rocks and a 1/4 cup of yarn. They take up the same space but weigh different. 2 oz of yarn might be 4 cups where as 2oz of rocks are 1/2 cup. Since most people do not have scales to measure their food companies will determine that 2oz of pasta takes up roughly 3/4 cup. This way you can still measure out a serving.

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