Message Boards » Fitness and Exercise

TOPIC: If your heart rate is over 180 during a workout, is that bad

← Previous 1
← Previous 1
 
Ic_disabled_photos
Topic has been inactive for 30 days or more and images have been disabled.
Display All Images
January 19, 2011 12:51 PM
My resting heart rate is around 64, but when I do some of my workouts, it gets up to 186 or higher. The highest being 198. I feel like I'm about to die sometimes, so I'll slow it down a bit. Is that pushing myself to hard??

Does anyone know what your heart rate should stay around during a vigrous workout?
January 19, 2011 12:57 PM
Mine I have a very hard time keeping under 175. if you're 20-30 it shouldn't be higher than 160-165 in a workout. 200 is cardiac arrest, so you need to be careful and slow down. Start by going slower and building endurance, that's what I had to do.
January 19, 2011 12:57 PM
Bump
January 19, 2011 12:59 PM
Check out HIIT training you are fine
  3511003
January 19, 2011 12:59 PM
200 is definitely not cardiac arrest. You can get into the 270s before you'll actually start to die but no one can sustain a heart rate that high for any period of time without having a medical condition that causes your heart to freak out like that.

I'd not sustain much over the low 180s for any long period of time though, just for safety's sake.
January 19, 2011 1:00 PM
During a "vigorous workout," I'm guessing that it'd be normal to be in the 180's and 190's. My idea of a vigorous workout though is in the 170's and 180's, but most of the time in the upper 160's. I think 198 is too high, but occasionally, if I'm working hard enough, my heart rate gets up there too. Doesn't happen often, but when it does, I immediately slow it down. If you feel like you're dying, it's too much!
January 19, 2011 1:01 PM
"Your Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) starts out at 220 beats per minute and falls by one beat each year. Therefore, you can calculate your Maximum Heart Rate by deducting your age from 220. So a good estimate of Maximum Heart Rate for a 40 year old is 180 (220-40 (age)) and for a 20 year old is 200 (200-20)."
Found this info at: http://www.calculatenow.biz/sport/heart.php
  3303170
January 19, 2011 1:02 PM
Wow..cardiac arrest at 200. Guess I better bring it down a notch. I'll be 33 in March, so probably around 165-170 would be ok? Thanks for the info.
January 19, 2011 1:04 PM
It depends on what YOUR maxium heart rate is and without knowing that most of the formulas are useless. A person's maximum is genetically determined, NOT a matter of fitness and not related to your resting heart rate. A good gauge is to work at a level that talking is somewhat difficult but not impossible, or if you know your maxium heart rate about 70-85% of your maxiimum. You should be able to maintain that heart rate for a period of time. You cannot use absolute numbers to say what is 'good' or 'bad'. Some people have maxiums well above 200 and they may be fine so to make a blanket statement that above 200 is cardiac arrest is ludicrous. Usually your body will tell you if you are too high as you can't keep up the workout for a prolonged period of time (assuming no underlying heart disease of course). I see so many people on these boards focusing on absolute numbers or percentages without understanding the physiology behind heart rate monitoring. I would recommend getting a book and studying up on it for anyone to really use heart rate monitoring correctly.
  437201
January 19, 2011 1:04 PM
Now that I am googling, it looks like I am wrong, and that's outdated info. However, if your heart is up that high, it's not good. I do see alot of links to thyroid problems, so maybe it wouldn't hurt to talk to your doctor?

I do know that the guidelines for heartrates do say to keep it below 170.
January 19, 2011 1:04 PM
Ok, just read the next post. So my heart rate according to that website should be around 187 if I calculated right. That sounds about right for me then. Thanks
January 19, 2011 1:05 PM
cardiac arrest cannot be 200! i think jennyfair is right -- 220-age = max heart rate. and i dont think you can substitute the word max for comfortable! thats hardwork!
  3896938
January 19, 2011 1:05 PM
if cardiac arrest is at 200, i guess i should be dead. when i run, my hr gets up to about 213 sporadically when I'm pushing it hard up a hill... of course i don't keep it there, but i really wouldn't even had known this if i didn't decide one day to run w/ a HRM on.

i think everyone's max HR is going to be different and depends on a lot of different factors, not just your age! i would say it also depends on your overall health as well. i gage whether i should push harder or less on how I'm feeling during a workout. you do get to know your body and you can figure out what is good and not so good.
  2270031
January 19, 2011 1:06 PM
Though the general maximum heart rate is calculated as mentioned above (220-your age), your actual heart rate is genetically determined and can be as much as +/- 15%, according to a trainer. You should really do a max heart rate test to determine how high yours is; Google it, or ask at your gym if you use one.
  3036099
January 19, 2011 1:09 PM
Your range to work out should be in the range of 60-85% of your maximum heart rate, of the 187 you quoted. So 112 to 159. A good cardio workout would be on the upper end of that.
January 19, 2011 1:11 PM
Sorry, but anyone who says that your HR should be X or should not be higher than Y doesn't know what they are talking about. Everyone is different. And one's max HR is different for different activities - max HR for swimming is considerably lower than for say running or rowing.

I've been exercising with a Heart Rate Monitor for over 20 yrs now and I've never seen my HR go above 185 and these days it rarely goes above 160.

If your max HR for a given activity is 198, which is quite possible, then aim for 70-80% of that for durations of 30-60 mins. That would put you in the range 139-158. You should be able to maintain this level of effort reasonably comfortably. If you're running, another way to gauge your effort is by monitoring your breathing. You should aim to inhale over two steps (L, R) and exhale over two (L, R). Or even 3 steps in and 3 steps out at the start of your runs. If you're puffing and panting more than that then you're pushing too hard and either won't be able to finish the workout or won't be able to do the next one comfortably.

Hope that helps.

AD.
January 19, 2011 1:14 PM
Schobert101 - thanks for your advice.

Sflorkie - I've been told I amy have a thyroid problem before (kinda runs in the family). Did it say how a thyroid problems could effect your heart rate?
January 19, 2011 1:15 PM
If you are trying to burn fat...from what I've read in the past you want to stay in that 75 - 80% range of your target heart rate. I'm 40 y/o and mine is 165. When I run however at 5.5mph its up around 180 - 190. But each day I run I notice it takes longer to get it to that and it comes down quicker when i stop. I hope that is a sign of better cardiac performance.
  3464082
January 19, 2011 1:15 PM
First and foremost, you should always consult your physician prior to starting any workout program. Also, it is important to note that cardiac arrest really is not the proper term to throw in here as related to high heart rate. Tachycardia, which can lead to cardiac arrest, is what we are really discussing here. Clinically this is when the heart exceeds 100bpm.

Also, there are many types of Tachycardia such as Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia which generally has a rate of 140 to 200 beats per minute. Atrial flutter, in which the atria beat at 240 to 300 beats per minute. Ventricular tachycardia, a very serious arrhythmia initiated in the ventricles, in which the heart rate is usually between 150 and 250.

ON TO THE QUESTION
The "general" calculation for a womans max heart rate is typically 226 - your age = age-adjusted maximum heart rate. 220- is typically for men. There are tons of variations on this formula our there but most will get you within 3 or 4 beats of eachother. no use splitting hair.

It is also possible that as your level of conditioning increases that your MHR may be well above this general formula. For me, I am 39 but my max heart rate is 189. But that sort of information should only be attained with the proper testing under medical/trained supervision.
Edited by Echoshill On January 19, 2011 1:16 PM
January 19, 2011 1:18 PM
Asejohnson _ Thanks , that does help. I'm not running, but the workout I am doing is P90x and the one that gets me up that high is the Plyometrics. Its a 60 minute dvd and my heart rate ranges from 170-187 usually. When it gets up to 187, I usually walk around for a minute to bring it down a bit. Is that ok?
January 19, 2011 1:20 PM
QUOTE:

During a "vigorous workout," I'm guessing that it'd be normal to be in the 180's and 190's. My idea of a vigorous workout though is in the 170's and 180's, but most of the time in the upper 160's. I think 198 is too high, but occasionally, if I'm working hard enough, my heart rate gets up there too. Doesn't happen often, but when it does, I immediately slow it down. If you feel like you're dying, it's too much!


I'd have to agree with you on that one.
January 19, 2011 1:22 PM
QUOTE:

First and foremost, you should always consult your physician prior to starting any workout program. Also, it is important to note that cardiac arrest really is not the proper term to throw in here as related to high heart rate. Tachycardia, which can lead to cardiac arrest, is what we are really discussing here. Clinically this is when the heart exceeds 100bpm.

Also, there are many types of Tachycardia such as Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia which generally has a rate of 140 to 200 beats per minute. Atrial flutter, in which the atria beat at 240 to 300 beats per minute. Ventricular tachycardia, a very serious arrhythmia initiated in the ventricles, in which the heart rate is usually between 150 and 250.

ON TO THE QUESTION
The "general" calculation for a womans max heart rate is typically 226 - your age = age-adjusted maximum heart rate. 220- is typically for men. There are tons of variations on this formula our there but most will get you within 3 or 4 beats of eachother. no use splitting hair.

It is also possible that as your level of conditioning increases that your MHR may be well above this general formula. For me, I am 39 but my max heart rate is 189. But that sort of information should only be attained with the proper testing under medical/trained supervision.



THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT READ THIS.
January 19, 2011 1:23 PM
QUOTE:

Asejohnson _ Thanks , that does help. I'm not running, but the workout I am doing is P90x and the one that gets me up that high is the Plyometrics. Its a 60 minute dvd and my heart rate ranges from 170-187 usually. When it gets up to 187, I usually walk around for a minute to bring it down a bit. Is that ok?


That seems to make sense.

Good luck,

AD.
January 19, 2011 1:25 PM
QUOTE:

Sorry, but anyone who says that your HR should be X or should not be higher than Y doesn't know what they are talking about. Everyone is different. And one's max HR is different for different activities - max HR for swimming is considerably lower than for say running or rowing.

I've been exercising with a Heart Rate Monitor for over 20 yrs now and I've never seen my HR go above 185 and these days it rarely goes above 160.

If your max HR for a given activity is 198, which is quite possible, then aim for 70-80% of that for durations of 30-60 mins. That would put you in the range 139-158. You should be able to maintain this level of effort reasonably comfortably. If you're running, another way to gauge your effort is by monitoring your breathing. You should aim to inhale over two steps (L, R) and exhale over two (L, R). Or even 3 steps in and 3 steps out at the start of your runs. If you're puffing and panting more than that then you're pushing too hard and either won't be able to finish the workout or won't be able to do the next one comfortably.

Hope that helps.

AD.


Could not agree more. It is very important to know that you are the only one (and maybe a trainer or doctor) that can find out what is safe and dangerous. 200 = cardiac arrest is absurd. I participated in a 4 hour class that revolved around heart rate monitoring and had a specialist monitor me and my numbers!!! (ME and MY!) I was found to have a max HR or 205 and thus I scheudle my workout around different zones. My resting is around 80. It is GOOD to get there during your workouts, so you should strive to hit it a handful of times. THE most important thing to discover and monitor is how fast your body gets from the Max or another "high HR #" to your recovery! Mine is 136. The faster I get to my active recovery, the "healthier" I am getting. I think it's important for people to be educated about their heart and their zones before trying any fitness program! Hope this helps :)

It's really good I think to ask for help but always remember to take it with a grain of salt!
  2629485
January 19, 2011 1:28 PM
Thanks for everyone's imput. I appreciate it and will look further into what my personal HR should be.

When working out, I feel pretty good around 170-175 but when it gets to 180 + that 's when it's hard, so I'll try slowing in down and not to push my self harder, for this workout is an hour long and I do want to burn the fat. Hopefully my performance endurance level will get better as I get in shape and my numbers will come down from there.

Message Boards » Fitness and Exercise

Posts by members, moderators and admins should not be considered medical advice and no guarantee is made against accuracy.