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TOPIC: Apple Cider Vinegar Pills

 
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January 18, 2011 10:08 AM
Has anyone on here had any success with using apple cider vinegar as an appetite suppressant? I've recently started taking the pills but as of yet have not felt any different. I'm starting to think it's just a myth.
January 18, 2011 10:14 AM
Studies show that apple cider vinegar can help surpress your appetite, although the change is not as significant as it would be with a B6+B12 complex.

Sometimes I throw 1 tbsp of apple cidar vinegar into my cooking, but I don't notice much difference in appetite.

=)
  1731104
January 18, 2011 10:15 AM
Nope, been there done that....I use Yerba Mate' tea
  3227087
January 18, 2011 10:15 AM
I think you are right, its a myth. My boyfriend says its complete bulls*&t!!
  2013645
January 18, 2011 10:16 AM
I took the Apple cider vinegar diet pills for a while and they did help with decreasing my appetite and gave me more energy without any funny side effects..but I did not shed any lbs while taking them so I stopped.
January 18, 2011 10:19 AM
I've never taken the pills, but i have a friend who takes ACV w/ water and honey every morning, she swears by it.
  3467362
January 18, 2011 10:19 AM
I know it might not taste as good, but you could try 1 table spoon of apple cider vinegar mixed in 8 oz. of water.
January 18, 2011 10:35 AM
Apple Cider Vinegar is used to help boost the immune system and also help your digestive system. Hope that helps.
Also, just my personal opinion but go ahead and keep taking it (but please not the pills, get the REAL thing) it's good for you and if you digestive system works well then I'm sure that somehow that helps with weight loss in the long run b/c the easier it is for your body to break things down the easier it is to absorb the proper nutrients and things from the food you are putting into your body. But no, it is certainly not a diet pill or appetite supressant... unless you consider the fact that it taste terrible. But it's worth it. I used to get sick all the time and now (thankfully) I havent had to worry about all the colds and stomache flu's going around at work.
  697156
January 18, 2011 10:59 AM
Thank you all for your collective knowledge : ) if I continue to try this apple cider business I will stick to the actual vinegar itself.
January 19, 2011 4:39 AM
I just love drinking apple cider vinegar from the bottle.
February 3, 2011 8:30 PM
I don't see it mentioned here but the Apple Cider Vinegar folks take for "health" reasons isn't the kind you buy at the grocery store. It should be natural, unfiltered apple cider vinegar - it's cloudy in the bottle - and contains the amazing 'mother' of vinegar which occurs naturally as connected strand-like chains of protein enzyme molecules.

It costs about $5.00 a quart compared to $1.89 for a half gallon of the distilled vinegar you'll find at the A & P.

Try Whole Foods, or any "natural" foods store. Bragg is a well known brand. And you drink it mixed with water and a little natural honey, maple syrup, black-strap molasses or Stevia for a quick pick-me-up. I add an ounce to 24 ounces of water in my bottle, sweetened with Stevia.
  2664785
March 30, 2011 12:18 PM
It hasn't helped me with appetite suppressing, but it has helped me lost a little weight, more than I normally would have and with less exercise (by force, not by choice).
  5318903
October 19, 2011 3:52 AM
I know this is several months later, but I started using the ACV a month and a half ago and can say that it does help with burning fat and suppressing the appetite. It also aids in upset stomach. It works, and I'm hooked. Hope this helps! smile
October 19, 2011 3:56 AM
QUOTE:

I just love drinking apple cider vinegar from the bottle.


i treid this once made me feel very ill ! Never went near it again sick
October 19, 2011 4:01 AM
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