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TOPIC: Early to Bed, Early to Drop Pounds

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February 6, 2014 8:26 AM
Notice a surge in your food cravings? You may want to check your bedtime. In the first laboratory study of its kind, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania showed that otherwise healthy people who stay up late and don’t get a good night’s sleep are likely to gain weight from indulging in fattier foods during the late-night hours.

In the study, published in the journal Sleep, 225 non-obese people between the ages of 22 and 50 were randomized into a sleep restriction group or control group for 5 nights—the sleep restricted group slept from 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. while the control group slept from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.

Because the study was conducted in the lab, the researchers were able to closely follow the eating and sleeping habits of all the participants. The subjects all ate the same meals at the same time each day, and they all had unlimited access to a fully-stocked kitchen.

The subjects who only slept four hours a night ate more than 550 additional calories than the control group and gained more weight. Overall, men gained more weight than women and African-Americans put on more weight faster than did Caucasians.

“People consumed a substantial amount of calories during those late-night hours when they would normally be in bed,” said study author and doctoral candidate Andrea Spaeth in a press release. “Those calories also were higher in fat compared to the calories consumed at other times of day.”

Apart from just being up late and possible boredom causing the tendency to drift over to the fridge for unnecessary snacking, some research has found that inadequate sleep can increase levels of the hormone ghrelin, which stimulates hunger cravings, while decreasing levels of leptin, the hormone responsible for feelings of fullness. Internal mechanisms aside, a good night’s sleep should always be a part of any weight loss or weight maintenance strategy. Not to mention a healthy lifestyle.

For starters, keep the high-calorie, high-fat food options out of your fridge—what’s not there can’t hurt you. In addition, some tips for helping to put your night-owl self to bed earlier are:

* Turn off the TV and other electronic devices. The light from such tools many people use to relax to during the later hours are actually messing with natural melatonin production, and the ability to fall asleep. Try reading a book or listening to music or an audio book to help your body relax and get into sleep mode.

* Reduce caffeine intake earlier in the day. Depending on the person, caffeine’s effects can linger for up to eight hours and affect the ability to fall asleep. If you know you’re sensitive to caffeine, aim to be caffeine-free by about 2 p.m.

* Exercise earlier, not later. A known benefit for a good night’s sleep, exercise can also make it difficult for the body to wind down after. Try exercising in the morning or an earlier time if you’re a regular evening exerciser.

* Enjoy a hot bath. Having a hot bath about an hour before bedtime can help the body and muscles relax. It can also increase core temperature, which upon leaving the bath the core temperature will drop and cause a natural release of melatonin, the hormone that tells the body to go to sleep.

* Supplement with Sleep Support & Renewal. If falling asleep at a set, desired time seems impossible for you, or you feel the sleep you are getting isn’t the quality sleep that you need, try supplementing with melatonin. A product with safe and effective amounts of melatonin with additional ingredients such as theanine and chamomile have shown to promote a calm and relaxed state. The ingredients work synergistically to reduce the time it takes to fall asleep while also helping to improve the quality of sleep and increase total sleep time.

References

1 Spaeth AM, Dinges DF, Goel N. Effects of Experimental Sleep Restriction on Weight Gain, Caloric Intake, and Meal Timing in Healthy Adults. Sleep 2013;36:981-90. doi.org/10.5665/sleep.2792

2 Figueiro MG, Plitnick B, Rea MS. Light modulates leptin and ghrelin in sleep-restricted adults. Int J Endocrinol 2012;2012:530726. doi: 10.1155/2012/530726
February 6, 2014 8:37 AM
What website are you getting all of this information from? It'd be great if you would site the source and provide a link.
February 6, 2014 8:45 AM
The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.
February 6, 2014 8:48 AM
QUOTE:

The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.


Awesome.

So can you please post the link with the references? Obviously you got this information on line. We're just looking for the link to the article with the references.
February 6, 2014 8:48 AM
QUOTE:

The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.


I think that means it was written by unicorns and kitties.
  30267599
February 6, 2014 8:48 AM
I find this to be true in my case. If I can't fall asleep at night, I'm highly prone to a binge on sweet, fatty food. One other thing about it, though: If you are awake until the wee hours of the morning, you are going to be hungry just from the pasage of time since your last meal.
February 6, 2014 8:49 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.


I think that means it was written by unicorns and kitties.


Ha Ha Ha!!! Them poor night owls - What they going to do????????
February 6, 2014 8:51 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.


Awesome.

So can you please post the link with the references? Obviously you got this information on line. We're just looking for the link to the article with the references.

The other one came from here: http://www.isagenixhealth.net
  3535168
February 6, 2014 8:53 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.


Awesome.

So can you please post the link with the references? Obviously you got this information on line. We're just looking for the link to the article with the references.

The other one came from here: http://www.isagenixhealth.net


Ahhh. Makes sense. indifferent
February 6, 2014 8:54 AM
4 hrs sleep vs. 10 hrs sleep - and these "researchers" think that bedtime is the difference? Sleep time is the differnce. Fatigue is the difference.

Now, had they measured a difference between groups that slept the same amount went to bed at different times, then your Topic would makes sense.
February 6, 2014 8:56 AM
QUOTE:

The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.


.... a company that sells melotonin supplements by any chance?

Seriously though, interesting article. Not sure I eat crap late at night if I stay up late, but I certainly find I eat more the following day if I'm tired.
  48528907
February 6, 2014 8:57 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.


.... a company that sells melotonin supplements by any chance?

Seriously though, interesting article. Not sure I eat crap late at night if I stay up late, but I certainly find I eat more the following day if I'm tired.


Which is why I think this is a good point:
QUOTE:

4 hrs sleep vs. 10 hrs sleep - and these "researchers" think that bedtime is the difference? Sleep time is the differnce. Fatigue is the difference.

Now, had they measured a difference between groups that slept the same amount went to bed at different times, then your Topic would makes sense.
  48528907
February 6, 2014 9:01 AM
No melatonin. Just a 30-day Cleansing and Fat-Burning System for $272 a pop.
  30267599
February 6, 2014 9:02 AM
Seems like it is all over the web. Here's the top hit from Google: http://www.isagenixhealth.net/early-to-bed-early-to-drop-pounds/

But really, it seems like crap to me (the PR and the manuscript it is promoting)

First: the title (at least of the PR) - "Early to bed" is wrong. The study looked at sleep deprivation, not "getting to bed early" per se. Subjects either went to bed at 10 pm or 4 am. In both cases, they got up at 8 am. So one group were getting 4 hours, the others 10 hours. A more realistic span would be, it seems to me, to look at 8 hours sleep vs 6.

Second - it was a lab study, so while they (the experimenters) could control the environment, the subjects couldn't. I would assume that the subjects were put in a room at 10 pm, and some of them told to go to sleep, and the rest had to sit there alone for 6 hours before they were allowed to sleep. In fact: "During the in-laboratory phase of the study, subjects were not permitted to leave the laboratory. In both the SR and control conditions, subjects were ambulatory but were not allowed to exercise. Subjects were permitted to watch television, read, play video or board games, and perform other sedentary activities between test bouts (which were completed while sitting at a computer)." (from the Sleep paper).

Third: No doubt, a selection of "snacks" were provided for them. So, bored people sitting in a room for 6 hours with nothing to do but watch TV and snack and not allowed to go to sleep. Just doesn't seem very realistic to me. Not surprising they put on weight really!
February 6, 2014 9:02 AM
If I don't get enough rest I definitely am craving sugar foods. My brain thinks my body needs it for immediate energy I'm sure.
  7943916
February 6, 2014 9:05 AM
QUOTE:

The article was written by a Research and Science Team in collaboration with a Scientific Advisory Board of a top, reputable health and wellness company, all of whom are the best and brightest professionals in the fields of nutrition, medicine and health and wellness.


Do you work for them?
February 6, 2014 9:06 AM
QUOTE:

I find this to be true in my case. If I can't fall asleep at night, I'm highly prone to a binge on sweet, fatty food. One other thing about it, though: If you are awake until the wee hours of the morning, you are going to be hungry just from the pasage of time since your last meal.


Agreed.
February 6, 2014 9:10 AM
To summarise; being awake for an extra 6 hours a day might cause you to eat more, and four hours sleep might not be especially healthy.

I'm not really sure I needed a study, or indeed an advertorial, to tell me that.
February 6, 2014 9:15 AM
Please stop.

Just stop with the posts of BS "science" that is all based off of crappy biased studies that really can't even be considered scientific in any way. From companies that are using said studies to support the junk that want to sell you.

It just makes you look bad.
  3112724
February 6, 2014 9:34 AM
QUOTE:

Please stop.

Just stop with the posts of BS "science" that is all based off of crappy biased studies that really can't even be considered scientific in any way. From companies that are using said studies to support the junk that want to sell you.

It just makes you look bad.


Perhaps I should do something better with my time and criticize people who are trying to educate others.
http://journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=29022
February 6, 2014 9:37 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Please stop.

Just stop with the posts of BS "science" that is all based off of crappy biased studies that really can't even be considered scientific in any way. From companies that are using said studies to support the junk that want to sell you.

It just makes you look bad.


Perhaps I should do something better with my time and criticize people who are trying to educate others.
http://journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=29022


It's a crap study. See my post above.
February 6, 2014 9:38 AM
QUOTE:

What website are you getting all of this information from? It'd be great if you would site the source and provide a link.


Here's her "source" -

www.isagenixhealth.net/early-to-bed-early-to-drop-pounds/‎

Now she's hoping you'll go and buy stuff from that site. Hey, maybe you can use her as the person who referred you for a nice introductory discount!
  5396342
February 6, 2014 9:40 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

Please stop.

Just stop with the posts of BS "science" that is all based off of crappy biased studies that really can't even be considered scientific in any way. From companies that are using said studies to support the junk that want to sell you.

It just makes you look bad.


Perhaps I should do something better with my time and criticize people who are trying to educate others.
http://journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=29022


Educate them on what? I already knew how to copy and paste.
February 6, 2014 9:54 AM
Why are you posting all of this any way?
February 6, 2014 9:57 AM
(edit) Nah. Never mind. Ya'll have fun with this one. Would be interesting to see one thread that wasn't a fight. Not likely. Is it really that controversial to suggest that getting a little sleep is a good idea? You people are something.
Edited by fast_eddie_72 On February 6, 2014 9:59 AM
  54557991

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