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TOPIC: PCOS and macro-nutrients ratio

 
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November 5, 2013 12:58 PM
Dear PCOS sufferers, i have heard alot about reducing carbs from diet to fight with PCOS.........so i was wondering what is a ratio of your macro-nutrients.??? Are you on low carbs/more proteins or low carbs/more fats regimen???
  37845212
November 5, 2013 1:05 PM
I don't have PCOS, but you might try the groups section. I have seen a groups for PCOS members.
November 5, 2013 1:06 PM
I'm on a low carb/high fat diet. My normal ratios are 5% carbs/ 30% protein/65% fat. From what I understand, getting the majority of calories from protein can have the same effect as having too many carbs in that it causes an insulin response. So keeping protein to a moderate level is what I have always read is the best recommendation.
  1249880
November 5, 2013 2:09 PM
QUOTE:

I'm on a low carb/high fat diet. My normal ratios are 5% carbs/ 30% protein/65% fat. From what I understand, getting the majority of calories from protein can have the same effect as having too many carbs in that it causes an insulin response. So keeping protein to a moderate level is what I have always read is the best recommendation.


And what are your main sources of fats???

And are you still losing weight on this ratio???
Edited by ntatbeeq On November 5, 2013 2:10 PM
  37845212
November 5, 2013 2:14 PM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm on a low carb/high fat diet. My normal ratios are 5% carbs/ 30% protein/65% fat. From what I understand, getting the majority of calories from protein can have the same effect as having too many carbs in that it causes an insulin response. So keeping protein to a moderate level is what I have always read is the best recommendation.


And what are your main sources of fats???

And are you still losing weight on this ratio???


You will lose weight with a calorie deficit regardless of your macro breakdown.

I wouldn't do a 5/30/65 plan long term. Please consult a doctor if you are going to try this plan. It is very difficult to meet your nutrition goals with carbs that low - there is no room for vegetables or fruit or dairy.
  5978
November 5, 2013 2:14 PM
before pregnancy it would vary from 35-50% carbohydrate/50-65% fat/ and 15-25% protein my focus was more portion control. I've always had a hard time pushing protein as I'm just not fond of many high protein foods.
  17474508
November 6, 2013 4:43 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I'm on a low carb/high fat diet. My normal ratios are 5% carbs/ 30% protein/65% fat. From what I understand, getting the majority of calories from protein can have the same effect as having too many carbs in that it causes an insulin response. So keeping protein to a moderate level is what I have always read is the best recommendation.


And what are your main sources of fats???

And are you still losing weight on this ratio???


You will lose weight with a calorie deficit regardless of your macro breakdown.

I wouldn't do a 5/30/65 plan long term. Please consult a doctor if you are going to try this plan. It is very difficult to meet your nutrition goals with carbs that low - there is no room for vegetables or fruit or dairy.


You are right about the fruit but everything else is not correct. All of the carbs I eat come from vegetables and dairy. I get all my macro and micro nutrient needs and have seen major improvement in both my PCOS and my insulin resistance. For many people this is a perfectly healthy way to eat and my doctor is 100% on board with it.

OP: At the moment I am pregnant so I my doctor has me eating a few more carbs but still staying under 100 per day. But prior to getting pregnant, I was on the diet for 3 months, I lost 10 lbs, my PCOS symptoms were almost gone, I was ovulating on my own (hence getting pregnant), I was weaning off of the metformin I was on and over all just felt amazing. I would definitely say it is really hard to get into the swing of the lifestyle and it really is a life long commitment. You will eventually be able to add a few more carbs but it will never be to the level of a "normal" person. I highly recommend trying though if you can stay dedicated. Learn as much as possible before you try! Check out these links to learn more.

www.dietdoctor.com/lchf

www.reddit.com/r/keto - check out the sidebar on the right to get all the info you will ever need!


As for fat sources, I eat full fat cheese and cream cheese, use cream in my coffee, full fat butter (not margarine), the natural fat with meat i.e. ground beef or steak, avocados are a good one but I can't eat those, olive oil, coconut oil is also good but once again I can't eat it. There are tons of sources. Most full fat diary products other than milk, have 1 carb or fewer per serving. This makes it very easy to get the fat without the carbs. Milk is definitely a no though!
  1249880
November 6, 2013 9:09 AM
On lower activity days, mine are split about evenly (so about 1/3 each). On higher activity days, I eat more fat and a little bit more carbs (I also have cholesterol issues from Hashimoto's, so my snacks while hiking all day are heavily nut-based, and my meats are very lean regardless of the day).

Do you have access to a registered dietitian? They can walk you through the diet recommended for people with PCOS + insulin resistance. In general, though, it is what one would expect a diabetic to be following. Most carbs should be "slow" carbs. Each meal should be about 45 grams of carbs (not including stuff like leafy greens, broccoli, etc., but do include beans, winter squash, potatoes, grains... that sort of thing). Snacks should be around 15 grams of carbs, also slow. Daily 200-250ish, depending on your activity level. Like someone else mentioned, you don't want to aim too low.

www.diabetes.org (ADA's website) has some good information on it.
  29082178

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